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I have a module in my CMS system that allows the web site to display Advertisements. It logs views and clicks. The query I use to summarize the log is performing poorly.

This is the query:

SELECT `a`.`id`,
    `a`.`active`,
    `a`.`static`,
    `a`.`position`,
    `a`.`file`,
    `a`.`title`,
    `a`.`url`,
    COUNT(DISTINCT `lv`.`id`) AS `views`,
    COUNT(DISTINCT `lc`.`id`) AS `clicks` 
FROM `ads` AS `a` 
LEFT JOIN `ad_log` AS `lv` 
    ON `lv`.`ad_id` = `a`.`id` 
    AND `lv`.`type` = 'view' 
    AND `lv`.`created` BETWEEN '2011-01-01 00:00:00'
        AND '2011-12-31 23:59:59' 
LEFT JOIN `ad_log` AS `lc` 
    ON `lc`.`ad_id` = `a`.`id` 
    AND `lc`.`type` = 'click' 
    AND `lc`.`created` BETWEEN '2011-01-01 00:00:00' 
        AND '2011-12-31 23:59:59' 
GROUP BY `a`.`id` 
ORDER BY `a`.`static` DESC,
    `a`.`position` ASC,
    `a`.`title` ASC 

The ad_log table has a two-column index on the ad_id and type columns. When I look at the profiler results, it is using that index. Would a different index be more performant?


UPDATE

After testing different index combinations, it seems that the current one is best. Maybe there's a better way to write the query?

Here's a screen capture of EXPLAIN SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE ...:

EXPLAIN SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE ...


SOLUTION

I have accepted DRapp's solution, but here is the query that I'd come up with. It's only slightly less performant than DRapp's solution:

SELECT `a`.`id`,
    `a`.`active`,
    `a`.`static`,
    `a`.`position`,
    `a`.`file`,
    `a`.`title`,
    `a`.`url`,
    (SELECT COUNT(*)
        FROM `ad_log` 
        WHERE `ad_id` = `a`.`id` 
        AND `type` = 'view' 
        AND `created` BETWEEN '2011-11-01 00:00:00' 
            AND '2011-11-30 23:59:59') AS `views`,
    (SELECT COUNT(*) 
        FROM `ad_log`
        WHERE `ad_id` = `a`.`id`
        AND `type` = 'click'
        AND `created` BETWEEN '2011-11-01 00:00:00'
            AND '2011-11-30 23:59:59') AS `clicks` 
FROM `ads` AS `a` 
ORDER BY `a`.`static` DESC,
    `a`.`position` ASC,
    `a`.`title` ASC 

BEST PERFORMANCE

This query, inspired by DRapp's solution, has even better performance:

SELECT `a`.`id`,
    `a`.`active`,
    `a`.`static`,
    `a`.`position`,
    `a`.`file`,
    `a`.`title`,
    `a`.`url`,
    SUM(CASE WHEN `l`.`type` = 'view' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS `views`,
    SUM(CASE WHEN `l`.`type` = 'click' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS `clicks` 
FROM `ads` AS `a` 
LEFT JOIN `ad_log` AS `l`
    ON `a`.`id` = `l`.`ad_id`
    AND `l`.`created` BETWEEN '2011-11-01 00:00:00'
        AND '2011-11-30 23:59:59'
GROUP BY `a`.`id`
ORDER BY `a`.`static` DESC,
    `a`.`position` ASC,
    `a`.`title` ASC 
share|improve this question
    
Out of interest could you also post the output of EXPLAIN SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE ..... rest of your query –  Adrian Cornish Dec 12 '11 at 21:29
    
Post the output of the explain query. –  theking963 Dec 13 '11 at 14:24
1  
@AdrianCornish and @daking963 - I have posted a screenshot of the EXPLAIN SELECT SQL_NO_CACHE results –  Sonny Dec 13 '11 at 14:55
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Another approach might be to have sub-select as the joins that pre-aggregates all view/clicks by the date range ONCE, then joins to all ads that were available.

SELECT 
      a.id,
      a.active,
      a.static,
      a.position,
      a.file,
      a.title,
      a.url,
      COALESCE( PreAgg.CntViews, 0 ) views,
      COALESCE( PreAgg.CntClicks, 0 ) clicks
   FROM
      ads AS a 
      LEFT JOIN 
         ( select lv.ad_id,
                  sum( if( lv.type = 'view', 1, 0 )) as CntViews,
                  sum( if( lv.type = 'click', 1, 0 )) as CntClicks
              from
                 ad_log lv
              where
                     lv.type in ( 'view', 'click' )
                 and lv.created between '2011-01-01 00:00:00'
                                    AND '2011-12-31 23:59:59' 
              group by
                  lv.ad_id ) PreAgg
        on A.ID = PreAgg.Ad_ID

It might be even faster if you have an index on the Ad_Log table based on (type, created, ad_id )... This way, for each "Type" will be grouped, then within each type, jump right to the date-range. So it should only have to hit 2 sections of the index... "view" by from/to and "click" by from/to. Instead of each "ad id", then check the types, then the dates...

share|improve this answer
    
I was working on a solution with sub-selects for each count column, but I like the pre-aggregation idea. My sub-select solution is much faster than my posted query, but this seems faster yet. –  Sonny Dec 13 '11 at 16:08
    
@Sonny, yet another possibility to optimize inner query by its index. See comment –  DRapp Dec 13 '11 at 16:31
    
I tried adding different indexes, but it continues to use the foreign key index for the pre-aggregation section. –  Sonny Dec 13 '11 at 16:45
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You can index ad_id, type, and created to get faster results.

This is a good read on how to index for joins. Read the other cases too, they are helpful.

You can further optimize it by indexing the GROUP BY columns but remember with more indexes your writes will be slower.

share|improve this answer
    
I will give that a whirl. –  Sonny Dec 12 '11 at 21:09
    
After further testing, adding created to the index slowed the query even more. –  Sonny Dec 13 '11 at 13:56
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