Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know this should be easily searchable on google, not to mention a trivial use of perl, but I've tried many solutions I've found and so far none of them gives the expected behavior. Essentially, I'm trying to call a subroutine, return a reference to a hash from that subroutine, pass a reference to that hash to another subroutine, and then print the contents of that hash, via code similar to the following:

#!/usr/bin/perl                                                                                                                                                                                                   

my $foo = make_foo();

foreach $key (sort keys %$foo) {
    print "2 $key $$foo{$key}\n";
}

print_foo(\%foo);

sub print_foo
{
    my %loc = ???;
    foreach $key (sort keys %loc}) {
        print "3 $key $loc{$key}\n";
    }
}

sub make_foo
{
    my %ret;
    $ret{"a"} = "apple";
    foreach $key (sort keys %ret) {
        print "1 $key $ret{$key}\n";
    }
    return \%ret;
}

Can someone tell me the best way of doing this (via subroutines) without creating an extra copy of the hash? The solutions I've tried have not printed out any lines starting with "3".

share|improve this question
7  
As an aside, I strongly recommend you start using use strict at the top of all your code. You will need to change your foreach lines to declare your variables using my, but it will save you many headaches debugging simple typos. –  zostay Dec 12 '11 at 22:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You have to pull the parameters in as a reference and then dereference it:

sub print_foo
{
    my ($loc) = @_;
    foreach my $key (sort keys %$loc) {
       print "3 $key $loc->{$key}\n";
    }
}

Anytime you make a reference, you have to explicitly dereference it. Also, beware that any changes to the reference will change the original. If you want to avoid changing the original, you can either pass the hash as a list:

print_foo(%foo); # flattens the hash to a list and passes it in through @_

sub print_foo
{
    my (%loc) = @_; # load the hash from the list
    foreach my $key (sort keys %loc) {
       print "3 $key $loc{$key}\n";
    }
}

Or copy the hash reference into a new hash:

sub print_foo
{
    my ($ref_loc) = @_; # changes to %$ref_loc will change %foo
    my %loc = %$ref_loc; # COPY, changes to %loc do not change %foo
    foreach my $key (sort keys %loc}) {
       print "3 $key $loc{$key}\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You want to convert that from a reference to a hash like so:

my %loc = %{@_[0]};

or

my %loc = %{shift};

You can also keep it as a reference:

my $locref = shift;
foreach $key (sort keys %$locref}) {
    print "3 $key $locref->{$key}\n";
}

This information can be found by typing perldoc perlref at the command line.

share|improve this answer
3  
Single element slice better written as %{$_[0]}, %{shift} is referring to a hash variable named shift, you probably meant %{+shift} or %{shift @_}. Named loop variables should be lexical foreach my $key... –  Eric Strom Dec 12 '11 at 22:17
    
Correct on all counts. –  Dan Dec 12 '11 at 22:21

Everything else is good, so I'm just going to concentrate on print_foo...

sub print_foo
{
    my %loc = %{shift @_};
    foreach $key (sort keys %loc) {
        print "3 $key $loc{$key}\n";
    }
}

FYI, you need to realize that %loc is now a COPY of the hash (I asked a question which explains this here: Confusion about proper usage of dereference in Perl ). To avoid making a copy...

sub print_foo
{
    my $loc = shift @_;
    foreach $key (sort keys %$loc) {
        my $val = $loc->{$key}
        print "3 $key $val\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.