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I have a multidimensional array with elements that can be completely random. For example,

[
    [ [1, 2], [2, 1], [3, 1], [4, 2] ],
    [ [2, 1], [4, 3], [3, 4], [1, 3] ]
]

I'd like to assign an ID to each unique element (as in [1,2], not the elements within those) so that I can recognize it later on when this array is much larger, but I can't seem to figure it out. I've been searching the internet for a while now with no luck, so if someone could give me a push in the right direction I'd really appreciate it.

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3  
How about using [1, 2] as unique id for [1, 2]? –  Sven Marnach Dec 12 '11 at 23:00
2  
Take a look at hash. Btw, lists are mutable -- you'll want to use tuples if possible. –  Josh Bleecher Snyder Dec 12 '11 at 23:13
1  
@JoshBleecherSnyder: hashes may collide, so they aren't that useful as an ID. –  Sven Marnach Dec 12 '11 at 23:16
1  
@SvenMarnach they can collide, it is true, but they're very unlikely to. If they did, other things would go disastrously wrong -- for example, dictionary look-ups would fail unexpectedly. Given how much rides on them at a language level, I'd feel comfortable using them in any non-cryptographic context. –  Josh Bleecher Snyder Dec 12 '11 at 23:30
3  
@JoshBleecherSnyder: A dictionary look-up doesn't go wrong just because of a hash collision. After comparing the hash, the dictionary checks if the keys are really identical, and if not, uses some collision resolution strategy. Hash collisions in dictionaries are actually quite common. –  Sven Marnach Dec 12 '11 at 23:37

4 Answers 4

How about using something like this?

class ItemUniqifier(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.id = 0
        self.element_map = {}
        self.reverse_map = {}

    def getIdFor(self, obj):
        obj_id = self.element_map.get(obj)
        if obj_id is None:
            obj_id = self.id
            self.element_map[obj] = obj_id
            self.reverse_map[obj_id] = obj
            self.id += 1
        return obj_id

    def getObj(self, id):
        return self.reverse_map.get(id)

uniqifier = ItemUniqifier()
print uniqifier.getIdFor((1,2))
print uniqifier.getIdFor((1,2))
print uniqifier.getIdFor("hello")
print uniqifier.getObj(0)
print uniqifier.getObj(1)

This prints:

0
0
1
(1, 2)
hello

So, for example, to create a large array, you can do something like this:

uniqifier = ItemUniqifier()
sample_array = []
for j in range(3):
    inside_array = []
    for i in range(10):
        inside_array.append(uniqifier.getIdFor((i, i+1)))
    sample_array.append(inside_array)

import pprint
pprint.pprint(sample_array)

for inside in sample_array:
    for elem in inside:
        print uniqifier.getObj(elem),
    print

This prints:

[[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9],
 [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]]
(0, 1) (1, 2) (2, 3) (3, 4) (4, 5) (5, 6) (6, 7) (7, 8) (8, 9) (9, 10)
(0, 1) (1, 2) (2, 3) (3, 4) (4, 5) (5, 6) (6, 7) (7, 8) (8, 9) (9, 10)
(0, 1) (1, 2) (2, 3) (3, 4) (4, 5) (5, 6) (6, 7) (7, 8) (8, 9) (9, 10)
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This is pretty thorough. Hopefully OP comes back and doesn't tl;dr this post. –  Edwin Dec 13 '11 at 0:13

The easiest way would be to use a dictionary, like so:

id_map = { 'some_id'  : example_array[0][0][0], # maps 'some_id'  to [1, 2]
           'other_id' : example_array[0][1][3], # maps 'other_id' to [3, 4]
           # add more if wanted...
         }

While a dictionary CAN use both alphabetical and number keys, it is not recommended to use number keys to refer to indices, since it may lead to confusion with list index numbering.

In addition, dictionaries can add new keys on demand, like so:

id_map[new_key] = new_pair

Since you said the lists were dynamically generated, this is the best choice.

Since each number pair is accessed through 3 index calls, perhaps you should make the ids 3 digits long? For example, [1, 2] would map to id '000' and [3, 4] to id '013'.

Dictionaries - Python Documentation

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Just realized that the proposed id scheme would not work if indices exceeded 10. Perhaps separate the indices with _, like 0_12_2? –  Edwin Dec 12 '11 at 23:10
1  
Why encode something in a string that is much more useful as a list? Where is the advantage of "0_12_2" over [0, 12, 2]? –  Sven Marnach Dec 12 '11 at 23:14
    
@SvenMarnach I don't understand what you're asking - AFAIK, dictionaries store keys as strings by default, even if they're initially passed in as numbers and booleans. Plus, 0_12_2 is meant to be a reference to whatever is at example_list[0][12][2]. –  Edwin Dec 12 '11 at 23:20
    
No, dictionaries in Python don't convert keys to anything else. They just use the object you give them. And I really don't get what the sentence "Plus, 0_12_2 is meant to be a reference to whatever is at example_list[0][12][2]." means. [0, 12, 2] could also be meant as a reference to example_list[0][12][2] -- it's just much easier to use. –  Sven Marnach Dec 12 '11 at 23:31
    
@SvenMarnach If you know so much, then why don't you answer the question instead of being unconstructive? And FYI, when I was working with booleans, calling .keys() returned ['True', 'False']. –  Edwin Dec 12 '11 at 23:40

If each "element" is sequence of two single-digit base 10 integers, you could generate a unique id for each one from its contents like this:

def uniqueID(elem):
    return elem[0]*10 + elem[1]

The basic idea is figure out some way to use the contents of an element to generate a ID. Exactly how the might be done would depend on what that content is, of course.

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Here's another answer that can handle mixed types -- i.e. lists, tuples, & strings -- of variable-length (even zero-length) sequences.

class EOS(object): pass  # end-of-sequence marker
EOS = EOS()  # singleton instance

class SeqID(object):
    """ Create or find a unique ID number for a given sequence. """

    class TreeNode(dict):
        """ Branch or leaf node of tree """
        def __missing__(self, key):
            ret = self[key] = self.__class__()
            return ret

    def __init__(self, first_ID=1):
        self._next_ID = first_ID
        self._root = self.__class__.TreeNode()

    def __getitem__(self, seq):
        # search tree for a leaf node corresponding
        # to given sequence and creates one if not found
        node = self._root
        for term in seq:
            node = node[term]
        if EOS not in node:  # first time seq encountered?
            node[EOS] = self._next_ID
            self._next_ID += 1
        return node[EOS]


elements = [
    [ [1, 2], [1, 3], [2, 1], [3, 1], [4, 2] ],
    [ [], [2, 1], [4, 3], [3, 4], (1, 3) ],
    [ [2, 2], [9, 5, 7], [1, 2], [2, 1, 6] ],
    [ 'ABC', [2, 1], [3, 4], [2, 3], [9, 5, 7] ]
]

IDs = SeqID(1000)
print '['
for row in elements:
    print '  [ ',
    for seq in row:
        print '%r: %s,' % (seq, IDs[seq]),
    print ' ],'
print ']'

With the elements of the multidimensional array shown in the test case, which are similar to those your example but with several additions, the following output is produced. Note that the ID numbers generated have been forced to start at 1000 to make them easier to spot in the output.

[
  [  [1, 2]: 1000, [1, 3]: 1001, [2, 1]: 1002, [3, 1]: 1003, [4, 2]: 1004,  ],
  [  []: 1005, [2, 1]: 1002, [4, 3]: 1006, [3, 4]: 1007, [1, 3]: 1001,  ],
  [  [2, 2]: 1008, [9, 5, 7]: 1009, [1, 2]: 1000, [2, 1, 6]: 1010,  ],
  [  'ABC': 1011, [2, 1]: 1002, [3, 4]: 1007, [2, 3]: 1012, [9, 5, 7]: 1009,  ],
]

The code works by internally constructing a multi-branched search tree based on the order the elements in each sequence occur and what they are.

A potential caveat is that the IDs produced are dependent on the order in which each unique sequence is first seen since each new ID is simply one more than the last one.

Also note that sequences of the same elements held in different containers will generate the same ID since the type of sequence is ignored in the code shown -- but it could be changed to take type into account, too.

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