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I'm having an issue with the stat function in C. My application must list all files in two directories (2nd directory not implemented yet). When dir1 is set to "." for current directory it lists all files. If I change it to the required directory it will only list one file.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <dirent.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

main ()
{
    DIR *dir1;
    DIR *dir2;
    dir1 = opendir ("/home/tom/Documents/Uni/Dropbox/OS/C/1/");
    dir2 = opendir ("/home/tom/Documents/Uni/Dropbox/OS/C/2/");
    struct dirent *ent;
    struct stat fileStat;

    if (dir1 != NULL) 
    {
        /* while there are files to read in the directory */
        while ((ent = readdir (dir1)) != NULL) 
        {
        /*printf ("In 1\n"); <--debugging--> */
        if (stat(ent->d_name,&fileStat) == 0)
        {
            /* ignores . and .. and hidden files */
            /* printf ("In 2\n"); <--debugging--> */
            if(ent->d_name[0] != '.')
            {
                /* printf ("In 3\n"); <--debugging--> */
                printf ("\n");
                printf ("File: %s\n", ent->d_name);
                printf ("File size: %d\n", fileStat.st_size);
                printf ("-----------------------------------\n");
            }
        }
    }
    /* close the 1st directory */
    closedir (dir1);
    /* close the 2nd directory */
    closedir (dir2);
    }
    else 
    {
        /* prints an error if the  directory can not be opened */
        perror ("");
    } 
}

The result of running the program is below:

tom@x60deb:~/Documents/Uni/Dropbox/OS/C$ ./ffffuuuuuu 

File: ffffuuuuuu.c
File size: 1045
-----------------------------------

This is the result of ls in the directory it is reading:

tom@x60deb:~/Documents/Uni/Dropbox/OS/C/1$ ls -l
total 36
-rw-r--r-- 1 tom tom 356 Dec 12 23:36 cwTest2.c
-rw-r--r-- 1 tom tom 322 Dec 12 23:36 cwTest.c
-rw-r--r-- 1 tom tom 627 Dec 12 23:36 ffffuuuuuu.c
-rw-r--r-- 1 tom tom   6 Dec 12 23:32 file
-rw-r--r-- 1 tom tom   6 Dec 12 23:32 file2
-rw-r--r-- 1 tom tom   6 Dec 12 23:45 file2.file
-rw-r--r-- 1 tom tom  15 Dec 12 23:33 file3
-rw-r--r-- 1 tom tom  15 Dec 12 23:45 file3.file
-rw-r--r-- 1 tom tom   6 Dec 12 23:45 file.file

Thanks in advance, Tom.

share|improve this question
    
what is your current directory? the entries are relative to "/home/tom/Documents/Uni/Dropbox/OS/C/1/" (you should give stat() the full pathname) ALSO: there are more entries than "." and ".." that start with ".". –  wildplasser Dec 13 '11 at 0:02
1  
Output the error of stat, and you'll know what the problem is. –  Beginner Dec 13 '11 at 0:02
    
@wildplasser I am running it in /home/tom/Documents/Uni/Dropbox/OS –  Schmooo Dec 13 '11 at 0:04
    
ENOENT, I presume ... –  wildplasser Dec 13 '11 at 0:05
    
@Beginner I'm not getting any errors that I am aware of. It just seems to be skipping some files. –  Schmooo Dec 13 '11 at 0:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <dirent.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

int main (void)
{
    char * dirname = "/home/tom/Documents/Uni/Dropbox/OS/C/1/" ;
    DIR *dir1;
    char path[11111];
    size_t len;
    struct dirent *ent;
    struct stat fileStat;

    dir1 = opendir (dirname);
    len = strlen ( dirname);
    memcpy(path, dirname, len+1);

    struct dirent *ent;
    struct stat fileStat;

    if (dir1 != NULL) 
    {
        /* while there are files to read in the directory */
        while ((ent = readdir (dir1)) != NULL) 
        {
        /*printf ("In 1\n"); <--debugging--> */
        strcpy(path+len, ent->d_name);
        if (stat( path,&fileStat) == 0)
        {
            /* ignores . and .. and hidden files */
            /* printf ("In 2\n"); <--debugging--> */
            if(ent->d_name[0] != '.')
            {
                /* printf ("In 3\n"); <--debugging--> */
                printf ("\n");
                printf ("File: %s\n", ent->d_name);
                printf ("File size: %d\n", fileStat.st_size);
                printf ("-----------------------------------\n");
            }
        }
    }
    /* close the 1st directory */
    closedir (dir1);
    }
    else 
    {
        /* prints an error if the  directory can not be opened */
        perror ("");
    }
return 0; 
}

UPDATE because some people cannot read, I'll add my original comment here:

what is your current directory? the entries are relative to "/home/tom/Documents/Uni/Dropbox/OS/C/1/" (you should give stat() the full pathname) ALSO: there are more entries than "." and ".." that start with ".".

share|improve this answer
    
There is no text or anything saying what you did here for your solution. What did you do? –  Michael Dorgan Dec 13 '11 at 0:33
1  
I added it in the comments, under the OP. diff is your friend. BTW: I updated. –  wildplasser Dec 13 '11 at 0:34
    
Diff as in a local app that I cut and paste code into, or something on this website I am not aware of? BTW, -1 is not me. –  Michael Dorgan Dec 13 '11 at 0:36
    
Anyone who spends a few minutes reading should be able to spot the differences. Otherwise he/she could scrape the content, and run diff manually. –  wildplasser Dec 13 '11 at 0:40
    
You should use PATH_MAX (from limits.h) rather than 11111 for the size of your path array. –  Chris Dodd Dec 13 '11 at 0:52

You have to specify the name to stat() either as an absolute path name or as the name relative to the current directory.

If your scanner is changing directory then (a) you're a braver man than I am, and (b) you can use the short names, but (c) you have to worry about how to get back to where you started.

If you have POSIX 2008, you may be able to use the *at() variants of the system calls to simplify life; but I'm not sure how many (if any) systems support those calls yet.

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