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I'm trying to get to grips with the visitor method in Java.

I'm trying to write a very simple program to get used to it. Basically it is a Food Menu. I want to read in user input (food type (starter, main course...) and the name of the food (pasta, fish...)) and then add this item to the menu.

I'm fairly sure I have the code correct so far, I'm just struggling to figure out how I pass the values read in from the user.

One of my friends who is also a programmer told me that you are supposed to have all of your functionality in the visitor classes (or at least as much as possible).

So do I take the user input and create it into a Menu Element? Then have the visitor add the element to the Menu? (I also want to be able to remove items from the Menu but I'm assuming that this is just reverse engineering the method to add)

Or do I not go so far as to have the visitor actually add the element. For example; would I just create the Menu Element and then pass that, then have the adding functionality in the Menu class?

To me it would make sense to have the visitor actually add the item, as it is functionality I want to keep specific to the adding visitor, but every time I try to implement I keep getting told that I have to make the arraylist containing the Menu Elements static, and I can't help but think I am doing it wrong.

I'm not 100% sure that the Visitor Pattern is correct for what I am trying to do?

Personally I believe I am either really, really close..... or WAY OFF!!

Any help you guys can offer would be great, even if you can point me towards a good tutorial that will help explain how to correctly use this pattern.

Here is what I have so far:

interface MenuElementVisitor {
    void visit(Starter starter);
    void visit(MainCourse mainCourse);
    void visit(Desert desert);
    void visit(Drinks drinks);
    void visit(Menu menu);
}

Menu Element Classes

interface MenuElement {
    void accept(MenuElementVisitor visitor); // MenuElements have to provide accept().
}

class Starter implements MenuElement {
    private String name;

    public Starter(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return this.name;
    }

    public void accept(MenuElementVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }
}

class MainCourse implements MenuElement {
    private String name;

    public MainCourse(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return this.name;
    }

    public void accept(MenuElementVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }
}

class Desert implements MenuElement {
    private String name;

    public Desert(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return this.name;
    }

    public void accept(MenuElementVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }
}

class Drinks implements MenuElement {
    private String name;

    public Drinks(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return this.name;
    }

    public void accept(MenuElementVisitor visitor) {
        visitor.visit(this);
    }
}

The Menu Class

class Menu implements MenuElement {
    MenuElement[] elements;

    public MenuElement[] getElements() {
        return elements.clone(); // Return a copy of the array of references.
    }

    public Menu() {
        this.elements = new MenuElement[] {     
            new Starter("Soup"), 
            new Starter("Pate"),
            new MainCourse("Steak"), 
            new MainCourse("Fish"),
            new Desert("Ice Cream"), 
            new Desert("Apple Tart"),
            new Drinks("7up"),
            new Drinks("Wine"),
        };
    }

    public void accept(MenuElementVisitor visitor) {   
        for(MenuElement element : this.getElements()) {
            element.accept(visitor);
        }
        visitor.visit(this);       
    }
}

Visitor to Add Items to the Menu

class MenuElementAddVisitor implements MenuElementVisitor {
    System.out.println("Press 1 for Starter, 2 for Main Course, 3 for Desert or 4 for Drinks");
    int MenuElementType = Console.readInt();
    System.out.println("Type the name of the Menu Element you want to add");
    String MenuElementName = Console.readString();

Visitor to Remove Items from the Menu

class MenuElementRemoveVisitor implements MenuElementVisitor {

}

Run the code demo

public class VisitorDemo {
    static public void main(String[] args) {
        Menu menu = new Menu();
        menu.accept(new MenuElementAddVisitor());
        menu.accept(new MenuElementRemoveVisitor());
    }
}
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2  
Looks like both of your visitor classes didn't make it in. Neither has a visit method and the second is empty. –  Chip McCormick Dec 13 '11 at 2:44
    
Dammit! I forgot to put that in last night (It was very late when I made the post, I'll throw in the code I have at the moment now) –  Ian Dec 13 '11 at 13:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think that your "adding" visitor shouldn't know about the fact that you use Command-Line arguments to indicate your menu names.

Indeed, this breaks SRP => Single Responsibility Principle because adding and reading are two actions so two responsibilities. To understand that, imagine you decide to read menu names now from file ... you'll have to open and recode your "adding" visitor class.

You should have a main generic class who just know about String (for the names) and specialized class someone can create or eventually use yours to precise from where arguments are provided.

So in your example, you should try to replace Console.readInt(); and Console.readString() with an int method parameter and a String method parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
And according to me, a visitor applies on an object already created, not for adding it... I would replace your MenuElementAddVisitor by a static method Factory with a String and an Int for parameters for example. –  Mik378 Dec 25 '11 at 20:11
    
Sorry but your comment is very unclear. There's nothing wrong about writing a visitor dealing with a hierarchy of objects and adding stuff to some other object. In fact we don't even know what was the OP's intent since his visitor classes are incomplete... –  Gilles Philippart Mar 7 '12 at 15:14

You may not have a need for a vistor in this case. The gang-of-four says:

" ... Use the Visitor pattern when

  • an object structure contains many classes of objects with differing interfaces, and you want to perform operations on these objects that depend on their concrete classes.

  • many distinct and unrelated operations need to be performed on objects in an object structure, and you want to avoid "polluting" their classes with these operations. Visitor lets you keep related operations together by defining them in one class. When the object structure is shared by many applications, use Visitor to put operations in just those applications that need them.

  • the classes defining the object structure rarely change, but you often want to define new operations over the structure. Changing the object structure classes requires redefining the interface to all visitors, which is potentially costly. If the object structure classes change often, then it's probably better to define the operations in those classes. ..."

If you really want a visitor pattern for something similar see this answer.

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