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I have HTML code like this:

<div id="first">
<dt>Label1</dt>
<dd>Value1</dd>

<dt>Label2</dt>
<dd>Value2</dd>

...
</div>

My code does not work.

doc.css("first").each do |item|
  label = item.css("dt")
  value = item.css("dd")
end

Show all the <dt> tags firsts and then the <dd> tags and I need "label: value"

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, your HTML should have the <dt> and <dd> elements inside a <dl>:

<div id="first">
    <dl>
        <dt>Label1</dt>
        <dd>Value1</dd>
        <dt>Label2</dt>
        <dd>Value2</dd>
        ...
    </dl>
</div>

but that won't change how you parse it. You want to find the <dt>s and iterate over them, then at each <dt> you can use next_element to get the <dd>; something like this:

doc = Nokogiri::HTML('<div id="first"><dl>...')
doc.css('#first').search('dt').each do |node|
    puts "#{node.text}: #{node.next_element.text}"
end

That should work as long as the structure matches your example.

share|improve this answer
    
It's works, thanks you guys! –  jgiunta Dec 13 '11 at 11:44
    
Instead of doc.css('#first').search('dt').each why not just doc.css('#first dt').each? Note also that this answer works under the assumption that there is always one-and-only-one <dd> immediately after each <dt> (which might not be the case in general HTML). –  Phrogz Dec 13 '11 at 17:34
1  
@Phrogz: No good reason for .css.search other than, perhaps, it is closer to what the OP already has. And I did include a "That should work as long as the structure matches your example" caveat. I'd agree that your approach would work better in a general case. (This is just a spelling correction of my last comment cuz I dun haz gud speling) –  mu is too short Dec 13 '11 at 20:42

Under the assumption that some <dt> may have multiple <dd>, you want to find all <dt> and then (for each) find the following <dd> before the next <dt>. This is pretty easy to do in pure Ruby, but more fun to do in just XPath. ;)

Given this setup:

require 'nokogiri'   
html = '<dl id="first">
  <dt>Label1</dt><dd>Value1</dd>
  <dt>Label2</dt><dd>Value2</dd>
  <dt>Label3</dt><dd>Value3a</dd><dd>Value3b</dd>
  <dt>Label4</dt><dd>Value4</dd>
</dl>'    
doc = Nokogiri.HTML(html)

Using no XPath:

doc.css('dt').each do |dt|
  dds = []
  n = dt.next_element
  begin
    dds << n
    n = n.next_element
  end while n && n.name=='dd'
  p [dt.text,dds.map(&:text)]
end
#=> ["Label1", ["Value1"]]
#=> ["Label2", ["Value2"]]
#=> ["Label3", ["Value3a", "Value3b"]]
#=> ["Label4", ["Value4"]]

Using a Little XPath:

doc.css('dt').each do |dt|
  dds = dt.xpath('following-sibling::*').chunk{ |n| n.name }.first.last
  p [dt.text,dds.map(&:text)]
end
#=> ["Label1", ["Value1"]]
#=> ["Label2", ["Value2"]]
#=> ["Label3", ["Value3a", "Value3b"]]
#=> ["Label4", ["Value4"]]

Using Lotsa XPath:

doc.css('dt').each do |dt|
  ct = dt.xpath('count(following-sibling::dt)')
  dds = dt.xpath("following-sibling::dd[count(following-sibling::dt)=#{ct}]")
  p [dt.text,dds.map(&:text)]
end
#=> ["Label1", ["Value1"]]
#=> ["Label2", ["Value2"]]
#=> ["Label3", ["Value3a", "Value3b"]]
#=> ["Label4", ["Value4"]]
share|improve this answer

After looking at the other answer here is an inefficient way of doing the same thing.

require 'nokogiri'
a = Nokogiri::HTML('<div id="first"><dt>Label1</dt><dd>Value1</dd><dt>Label2</dt><dd>Value2</dd></div>')

dt = []
dd = []

a.css("#first").each do |item|
  item.css("dt").each {|t| dt << t.text}
  item.css("dd").each {|t| dd << t.text}
end

dt.each_index do |i|
  puts dt[i] + ': ' + dd[i]
end

In css to reference the ID you need to put the # symbol before. For a class it's the . symbol.

share|improve this answer
    
oh. Makes sense now. –  Kassym Dorsel Dec 13 '11 at 2:37
    
Note that since "#first" can only ever match one element, what you have is equivalent (but worse) than: item = a.at_css("#first"). Using each on the outside is entirely superfluous. –  Phrogz Dec 13 '11 at 16:30
    
Also, note that this answer assumes that there is always exactly a 1-1 pairing between <dt> and a <dd>. Although this is true for the original question markup, it may not always be true in real-world markup. Finally, with iterating two paired arrays, you might consider using dt.zip(dd).each{ |dt,dd| ... } instead of each_with_index. –  Phrogz Dec 13 '11 at 16:34

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