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I'm currently working on a game using the Component Pattern, and have always wondered how this is done. I have an entity which is practically just a bag of components. Each components extends the Component class, which just has some basic functionality.

Extending the component class, new components are created, for handeling input, graphics etc. Now comes the problem; When I'm trying to get a specific component from the entity, it always returns the basic Component class, which prevents me from using the specific component functions.

    public class GameEntity
{
    private ArrayList<Component> components;

    public GameEntity()
    {
        components = new ArrayList<Component>();
    }

    public void addComponent(Component component)
    {
        components.add(component);
    }

    public void update()
    {

    }

   public Component getComponent(Class type)
   {
       for (Component component : components)
       {
            if(component.getClass() == type)
            {
                //return component as Class;

            }
       }
       return null;
   }


    public void draw(Canvas canvas)
    {
        for (Component component : components)
        {
            component.update();
            component.draw(canvas);
        }
    }

}

Some example components:

public class GraphicsComponent extends Component {

public Bitmap bitmap; public Rect currentFrameRect; private ArrayList spriteAnimations; public SpriteAnimation currentAnimation; public int x = 0; public int y = 50; public GraphicsComponent() { spriteAnimations = new ArrayList(); }

/**
 * Adds image [converts to spriteanimation]
 * @param image
 */
public void addImage(Bitmap image, String label)
{
    Rect[] tmpRects = {new Rect(0, 0, image.getWidth(), image.getHeight())} ;
    addAnimation(new SpriteAnimation(
            image, tmpRects, label
    ));
}

public void addAnimation(SpriteAnimation spriteAnimation)
{
    spriteAnimations.add(spriteAnimation);

   if(currentAnimation == null)
   {
       currentAnimation = spriteAnimation;
   }
}


@Override
public void update()
{
   currentFrameRect = currentAnimation.frames[currentAnimation.currentFrame];
}

@Override public void draw(Canvas canvas) {

    if(currentAnimation != null)
    {
        currentAnimation.draw(x, y, canvas);
    }     }
public int getWidth()
{
    return currentAnimation.frames[currentAnimation.currentFrame].width();
}

public int getHeight()
{
    return currentAnimation.frames[currentAnimation.currentFrame].height();
}
}


public class InteractiveComponent extends Component
{
    public GraphicsComponent graphics;

    public InteractiveComponent(GraphicsComponent graphics)
    {
        this.graphics = graphics;
    }

    public boolean isOver(int tapX, int tapY)
    {
        //left top right bottom
        if(tapX > graphics.x && tapX < graphics.x + graphics.getWidth() &&
           tapY > graphics.y && tapY < graphics.y + graphics.getHeight()
        )
        {
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

}

There seem to be some problems with the code formatting, but it should be clear. I can't access any specific functions like getHeight() in the graphicComponent or isOver() from the interactiveComponent because I just get a basic Component returned.

I would like to return a GraphicsComponent or InteractiveComponent based on the Class that I pass into getComponent().

share|improve this question
    
Downcast to the class you want. –  Keith Layne Dec 13 '11 at 0:14
    
This is way too much example code. –  millimoose Dec 13 '11 at 0:20
    
I was not familiar with the term downcasting, thanks for mentioning it. I apologize for the lengthy code, I was afraid my question wasn't clear enough. –  omgnoseat Dec 13 '11 at 20:07
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you're trying to do seems architecturally suspect to me, but nonetheless it can be done in a "clean" way using generics, and you're already passing in the class object as a type token:

class Animals {
    List<Animal> animals = new ArrayList<Animal>();

    public <T extends Animal> T getAnimal(Class<T> type) {
        for (Animal animal : animals) {
            if (type.isAssignableFrom(animal.getClass())) {
                return type.cast(animal);
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}

class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Animals animals = new Animals();
        animals.getAnimal(Cat.class).meow();
        animals.getAnimal(Dog.class).bark();
    }
}

interface Animal {}

class Cat implements Animal {
    public void meow() {}
}

class Dog implements Animal {
    public void bark() {}
}

You can == or equals() instead of the isAssignableFrom() check depending on the exact behaviour you want.

share|improve this answer
    
This is 100% what I was searching for, thanks! I don't really understand the syntax and purpose of the "T" there though. Do you think there is a better architecture for this sort of thing? I've thought about it quite some time, but couldn't think of any other way to solve this problem with the component pattern in mind, except for Oli Charlesworth's solution. –  omgnoseat Dec 13 '11 at 20:16
    
A Class<T> parameter and a T return value is the way to tell the compiler that the return type of a method depends on the parameter value – it's how you can say "return something of this type". –  millimoose Dec 13 '11 at 20:33
    
Architecturally, it seems you have a bunch of singletons – objects where usually only one instance of their type exists. The popular way of handling that is using an IoC container and dependency injection to avoid having to code one bloated class with many getters that manages these. The raison d'etre of IoC containers is to implement this pattern in a generic way. Try looking at Guice or the Spring Framework. –  millimoose Dec 13 '11 at 20:37
    
I may understand incorrectly, but there can be multiple entities which all have their own components. So there can be more than 1 instance of said component. I will try looking at the frameworks, but it all seems a bit above my level to be honest :( I have another problem I just ran into: I extended the graphicsComponent so I can set up some easy templates to use, where all the animations are already predefined etc. However, since it only checkes if it is a match with graphicsComponent, and not any of it's super classes, it returns a null :( Any way to check the super classes aswell? –  omgnoseat Dec 13 '11 at 23:48
    
Well actually, I know there is a way to check all the super(base) classes, but this seems even dirtier than what I'm already doing. Do you suggest a different method? Thanks ! –  omgnoseat Dec 14 '11 at 0:02
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Others have suggested downcasting as a solution. I would say: redesign.

If you find yourself needing to downcast, then it indicates you probably have an architectural problem. And indeed, you have. You want to access each object, but not in a polymorphic way. So trying to access specific objects via a container of the supertype is unnatural/unhelpful/inefficient.

I would suggest:

class GameEntity {
    private GraphicsComponent graphics;
    private InteractiveComponent interactive;
    private SoundComponent sound;

    private List<Component> components;

    public GameEntity() {
        components.add(graphics);
        // etc.
    }

    public GraphicsComponent getGraphics() { return graphics; }
    // etc.

    public void draw() {
        for (Component c : components) {
            ...
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
While a redesign in this case is probably appropriate, the statement that if you need to downcast then you have an architectural problem is certainly not always the case. –  increment1 Dec 13 '11 at 0:28
    
@increment: Indeed, that's why I said "indicates"; it's not always the case, but it usually is. –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 13 '11 at 0:29
    
Your edit adds probably which seems more appropriate, but I would even weaken that to may, but that is probably just opinion. In your re-arch suggestion you may still need to address that the components seem dynamic and need to be iterated over for drawing / updating. –  increment1 Dec 13 '11 at 0:39
    
@increment1: True, I was considering that myself. I guess the solution is to store the components both them both as named subtypes, and in a container –  Oli Charlesworth Dec 13 '11 at 0:40
    
There are going to be a whole lot of components, so my file would be flooded with getters. But it sure works, thanks for the response! –  omgnoseat Dec 13 '11 at 20:01
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Once you have received a component in this manner, you would have to cast it back to the class type. Then you could access the getHeight() etc. The object is simply not known to be a graphicComponent but it is.

share|improve this answer
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Well, the function returns a Component. If you know you have requested a specific component, cast the result:

GraphicsComponent gc = (GraphicsComponent)(gameEntityInstance.getComponent(GraphicsComponent.class));
share|improve this answer
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Your best bet would be to cast when you call getComponent() and remove the Class argument from that method.

So, getComponent will return a Component which can be cast into either InteractiveComponent or GraphicsComponent:

public Component getComponent() { /* its contents */ };

GraphicsComponent gc = (GraphicsComponent)...getComponent();
InteractiveComponent ic = (InteractiveComponent)...getComponent();
share|improve this answer
    
I kind of dislike casts, don't know why but It feels hacky to use them. Seems like a fine solution though, thanks. –  omgnoseat Dec 13 '11 at 20:17
    
I feel the same, but I haven't found a better way to do it, yet. –  Jon Dec 13 '11 at 21:01
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