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I'm writing a bash script to add, commit, push all files in a directory.

#!/bin/bash  
git add .  
read -p "Commit description: " desc  
git commit -m $desc  
git push origin master

I'm getting the following error:

$ ./togithub  
Commit description:   
test commit script  
error: pathspec 'commit' did not match any file(s) known to git.  
error: pathspec 'script"' did not match any file(s) known to git.  
Everything up-to-date

I'm not sure if this is a problem with reading in the text (it echos fine) or passing it to git commit -m.

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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You have to do:

git commit -m "$desc"

In the current script, test is going as commit message and commit and script are being treated as next arguments.

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"Do proper quoting" can never be overstated enough. Way too many subpar “howtos” and halfcorrect advice/examples on the net... –  jørgensen Dec 13 '11 at 1:55
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Here's a merge of the last two answers - chaining together the add -u is awesome, but the embedded read command was causing me troubles. I went with (last line used for my heroku push, change to 'git push origin head' if that's your method):

#!/bin/bash
read -p "Commit description: " desc
git add . && \
git add -u && \
git commit -m "$desc" && \
git push heroku master
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it is helpful to remove from the index the files that have actually been deleted. git add -u takes care of this. Also, you may want to consider chaining these commands together like this:

git add . && \
git add -u && \
git commit -m "$(read -p 'Commit description: ')" && \
git push origin HEAD

If any command fails, it will stop evaluating the remaining commands.

Just food for thought (untested food).

Thanks!

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2  
You can also use #!/bin/bash -e to make the script exit if any of the commands fail. –  bluegray Apr 5 '12 at 14:21
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