Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to setup Getopt::Long to handle the arguments from a configuration script.

Here is my starter;

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Getopt::Long;

my $config_file = '';

GetOptions (

    'config|c=s' => \$config_file,
    'add|a' => \&add_server,
    'del|d' => \&del_server,

);

sub add_server {

print "$config_file\n";

}

sub del_server {

# Left blank for now.

}

The odd thing is I am running into a problem when I run my script with something like this,

./config.pl -a -c config.xml

It does NOT print the -c option, but if I run it like this,

./config.pl -c config.xml -a

it works like it should.

I think I understand the reason why, it has to do with the order execution right?

The question is how can I fix it? Should I use Getopt::Long in conjunction with @ARGV?

Ultimatly I am trying to make the command line args pass into the subroutine that I am calling. So if -a or --add I want the options of -c or --config to pass into the subroutine when it is called.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

I don't see the need to call the subroutine directly from the GetOptions call. Control the order like this:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Getopt::Long;

my %opts = (config => '');

GetOptions(\%opts, qw(
   config|c=s
   add|a
   del|d
));

add_server() if $opts{add};
del_server() if $opts{del};

sub add_server {    
    print "$opts{config}\n";
}

sub del_server {}
share|improve this answer

Boiling the example down a little bit...

use strict;
use warnings;
use Getopt::Long;

my $config_file = '';

GetOptions (

    'config|c=s' => \$config_file,
    'add|a' => sub{add_server($config_file);}
);

sub add_server
{

    my $config=shift;

    if(defined($config))
    {
        print "Got this for a config file: $config\n";
    }
    else
    {
        print "No argument supplied to add_server\n";
    }

}

... and running config.pl -c blurg -a returns the output Got this for a config file: blurg, and running config.pl -a -c blurg returns Got this for a config file:.

So, what I suspect is happening is that the options are assigned in the order given. So in the first case $config_file is assigned to the -c argument and then the add_server subroutine is called (with the correct argument), whereas in the second case, add_server is immediately fired off with no argument and then $config_file is assigned.

All this aside, I'd recommend making -a a boolean and do whatever you want to do if it's enabled (and if an argument for -c is supplied).

share|improve this answer
1  
Re: "you can't associate an option directly to a code-reference to a named subroutine." Completely false. A code ref is a code ref. –  ikegami Dec 13 '11 at 1:22
    
@ikegami - Upon further reading, it looks as though that's only for the exportable messages. Lemme edit. –  Jack Maney Dec 13 '11 at 1:53

The callbacks are called as the options are encountered, so add_server is being called before -c has been encountered when you do

./config.pl -a -c config.xml

Based on the latest info, you now want:

use Getopt::Long qw( GetOptions );

GetOptions(
   'a=s' => \my $opt_a,
   'd=s' => \my $opt_d,
   'h=s' => \my $opt_h,
   'p=s' => \my $opt_p,
) or usage();
share|improve this answer
    
I only need to specify a single config file. –  Solignis Dec 13 '11 at 3:19
1  
@Solignis, Why not just do -a config.xml, then? –  ikegami Dec 13 '11 at 3:32
    
@Solignis, Why don't you specify what interface you do want before this becomes a game of 20 questions. –  ikegami Dec 13 '11 at 3:33
    
The original idea was to have -a and -d control the specific section of the config you wish to add or delete. For example -a server01 would call the add_server subroutine with the option server01 But I could not figure out how to get one option to do two things without getting messy. –  Solignis Dec 13 '11 at 3:37
    
@Solignis, Q2) Which option should do two things? Q3) What two things should it do? –  ikegami Dec 13 '11 at 5:07
GetOptions(
        'arg=s' => sub { print "$_[1]\n"; },
);
share|improve this answer
    
would be good to post an explanation of how the code works –  DNKROZ Jul 2 at 15:12
1  
Sorry, I thought it would be self explaning. The GetOptions() function passes the parameters array @_ to the whatever_you_like function that is referenced as argument action. The array contains the full name of the argument (arg) in $_[0] and it's value in $_[1]. –  hugg Jul 3 at 6:05

Enable the pass_through option on Getopt::Long so that it will ignore unknown options, then call GetOptions once for your options, disable it again, and then use GetOptions again for your command.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll format this nicer when I get home (posting on a phone isn't the easiest) –  Christopher Neylan Dec 13 '11 at 0:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.