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import math
print "python calculator"
print "calc or eval"
while 0 == 0:
    check = raw_input() #(experimental evaluation or traditional calculator)
    if check == "eval":
        a = raw_input("operator\n") #operator
        if a == "+":
            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            c = input("arg2\n") #inarg2
            z = b + c
            print z
        elif a == "-":
            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            c = input("arg2") #inarg2
            z = b - c
            print z
        elif a == "/":
            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            c = input("arg2\n") #inarg2
            z = b / c
            print z
        elif a == "*":
            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            c = input("arg2]n") #inarg2
            z = b * c
            print z
        elif a == "^":
            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            c = input("arg2\n") #inarg2
            z = b ** c
        elif a == "sin":
            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            var = math.degrees(math.sin(b))
            print var
        elif a == "asin":
            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            var = math.degrees(math.asin(b))
            print var
        elif a == "cos":
            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            var = math.degrees(math.cos(b))
            print var
        elif a == "acos":
            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            var = math.degrees(math.acos(b))
            print var
        elif a == "tan":
            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            var = math.degrees(math.tan(b))
            print var
        elif a == "atan":
            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            var = math.degrees(math.atan(b))
            print var
    elif check == "calc" :
        x = input() #takes input as expression
        print x #prints expression's result

Isn't the sine of 90 degrees 1? With this it shows up as something around 51.2? Google's calculator does this too? BTW: this is my python calculator

            b = input("arg1\n") #inarg1
            var = math.degrees(math.sin(b))
            print var

This one and other trig functions are the problem. For the most part, this was just a simple python calculator, but I wanted to add some trig functions.

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6 Answers 6

You don't want o convert the return value of sin() to degrees -- the return value isn't an angle. You instead want to convert the argument to radians, since math.sin() expects radians:

>>> math.sin(math.radians(90))
1.0
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Python's sin and cos take radians not degrees. You can convert using the math.radians function. Basically, you are using the wrong units.

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Every language I know uses radians for trig functions, without exception. –  duffymo Dec 13 '11 at 2:32
    
@duffymo, I used a library once that used 0-256 sorta-degrees. But yeah pretty much anything uses radians. –  Winston Ewert Dec 13 '11 at 2:49
    
Huh? Please find a link to it. I've written Fortran, Pascal, C, C++, Java, Python - all use radians. –  duffymo Dec 13 '11 at 2:53
1  
@duffymo, here it is: alleg.sourceforge.net/stabledocs/en/… –  Winston Ewert Dec 13 '11 at 3:11
    
Thank you, I'm unfamiliar with Allegro. –  duffymo Dec 13 '11 at 3:25

You are using degrees, but the sin function expects radians (see the documentation: help(math.sin)). 90° is 𝜋/2.

>>> import math
>>> math.sin(math.pi/2)
1.0
>>> math.radians(90) - math.pi/2
0.0
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Convert your input from degrees to radians before calling math.sin

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        var = math.degrees(math.sin(b))

This code does not do what you think it does. It takes the sin of b and then converts that answer (which is not in radians!) from radians to degrees.

The sin of 90 radians is .894. .894 radians is 51 degrees. So that's why you get that answer, but it's all wrong.

You probably want:

        var = math.sin(math.radians(b))
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I got 0.0156031852817 when I id that, how do I get in to return degrees? –  user1080694 Dec 13 '11 at 1:09
    
sorry nevermind –  user1080694 Dec 13 '11 at 1:12
1  
@user1080694 The value of sine mathematically is not degrees or radians, it is a periodic function that will oscilate between -1 and 1 with a period of 2*pi. The inverse of the sine can be in degrees, but in python the math.asine function will be returned in radians, which you can then convert to degrees with math.degrees –  TimothyAWiseman Dec 13 '11 at 1:14

Most math functions, including Python's math functions, use radians as the measure for trigonometric routines.

Compare:

>>> math.sin(90)
0.8939966636005579
>>> math.sin(3.1415926535)
8.979318433952318e-11
>>> math.cos(180)
-0.5984600690578581
>>> math.cos(2*3.1415926535)
1.0
>>> 
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