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My question is similar to this one and this one.

In essence, something like the following is what I'm looking for -- or a fairly clean hack for pulling it off:

GET_TIMESTAMP  = $(shell perl -e 'print time()')
START_TIME    := ${GET_TIMESTAMP}

all: T1 T2 ... TN

T1:
T2:
...:
TN:

#...

timer:
  @perl -e 'printf( "Loaded makefiles in %ds, build completed in %ds\n", $ARGV[1] - $ARGV[0], $ARGV[2] - $ARGV[1] );' ${START_TIME} ${LOAD_COMPLETE} ${GET_TIMESTAMP}

.ATEND: timer

LOAD_COMPLETE := ${GET_TIMESTAMP}

... which could be kicked off in a number of ways:

~ gmake all
(...)
  Loaded makefiles in 8s, build completed in 93s
~ gmake T2 T3 T4
(...)
  Loaded makefiles in 8s, build completed in 13s

At the heart of it is this idea of an .ATEND special target that causes something to happen when all CMDGOALS or DEFAULTGOALS are finished.

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2 Answers 2

If you just want to time your build, and you're running on a UNIXy platform, why not just use time itself?

As in:

pax$ time sleep 1
    real    0m1.004s
    user    0m0.000s
    sys     0m0.000s

(although, in your case, it would of course be time gmake all).

This seems a much more elegant solution than trying to code something up in make and uses the right tools for the job.


Alternatively, you could modify the rule itself to be something like:

all: T1 T2 ... TN
    @perl -e blah blah blah

This will ensure the Perl is executed once all targets are complete - you'll have to fiddle with the makefile so it's not an automatic solution (you'll be best off limiting yourself to certain high-level targets), but I don't think that's a huge burden since makefiles tend to be relatively changeless once set up correctly.

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+1 because it is a viable alternative. I wanted it built-in so you would always have the facility available without having to use an extra tool, but this is certainly a decent alternative if nothing else is available. Part of the custom solution was being able to time how long it takes to parse all the makefiles, but I may have to settle for command-line tools and a custom target for timing stuff. –  Brian Vandenberg Dec 13 '11 at 16:23
    
for some reason time make outputs nothing from time... –  Justin C Mar 13 at 22:34
up vote 0 down vote accepted

A solution just occurred to me for this:

GET_TIMESTAMP  = $(shell perl -e 'print time()')
START_TIME    := ${GET_TIMESTAMP}

all: T1 T2 ... TN

T1:
T2:
...:
TN:

timer_target : ${TIMER_DEPENDENCY}
  @echo do whatever to print out timing info

This would be used from the command line as:

gmake timer_target TIMER_DEPENDENCY='T3 T4 T5'

... or something similar.

It won't work for every target seamlessly, but it's usable.

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