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Here is my code:

package survival;
import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;

public class Survival extends JFrame { 
    private static int applicationWidth = 1400;
    private static int applicationHeight = 900;  

    public Survival() {
        setTitle("Survival");
        setResizable(false);
        setSize(applicationWidth, applicationHeight);
        setVisible(true);
        setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    }

    public void paint(Graphics g) {
        g.drawString("Test", 0, 0);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Survival();
    }
}

Why isn't "Test" showing up?

share|improve this question
    
I usually cast the Graphics object to Graphics2D. Not sure if that's the issue or not. –  mc10 Dec 13 '11 at 2:24
    
1) It is generally folly to be overriding paint() in a Swing top-level container. Instead override paintComponent() in a JComponent or JPanel, then add that to the TLC. 2) Then set the preferredSize() of the custom component, add it to the frame and call pack(). That will ensure the rendering area is 1400x900. 3) Swing GUIs should be created & updated on the EDT. 4) At co-ordinates of 0x0, the String will be largely invisible. 5) Just a side note, but if you can get a GUI to fail at 400x300, no need to set it to 1400x900! –  Andrew Thompson Dec 13 '11 at 2:43
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to invoke paint() method of super class. (Article - Painting in AWT and Swing)

 public Survival() {
        setTitle("Survival");
        setResizable(false);
        setSize(applicationWidth, applicationHeight);
        setVisible(true);

        setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        repaint();
    }

    public void paint(Graphics g) {
        super.paint(g);    
        g.drawString("Test", 120, 120); //change the co-odrinates
    }

Override the paintComponent of JPanel.

 public Survival() {
        setTitle("Survival");
        setResizable(false);
        setSize(applicationWidth, applicationHeight);
        setVisible(true);
        add(new DrawPanel());
        setDefaultCloseOperation(EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
     }

   class DrawPanel extends JPanel
   {
    @Override
    protected  void paintComponent( Graphics g){
       g.drawString("Test", 220,220);
      }
   }
share|improve this answer
    
Whoa, it's magic obviously :) –  Conner Ruhl Dec 13 '11 at 2:32
    
@ConnerRuhl - Drawing on JFrame is very tricky. You have to use JPanel and override the paintComponet method. –  AVD Dec 13 '11 at 2:39
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Do not override paint. Whenever you customize a component, override paintComponent.

Example -

@Override
protected final void paintComponent(final Graphics g){
    super.paintComponent(g);
    final Graphics gCopy = g.create(); // Prevents clobbering
    gCopy.drawString("Test", 0, 0);
    gCopy.dispose();
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Крысa - Did you compiled this code? –  AVD Dec 13 '11 at 2:34
    
@AVD, Why? Do you want to make a comment about it? –  mre Dec 13 '11 at 2:34
2  
I have two observations: You should invoke super.paintComponent(), as suggested here, and I don't see a reason to clone the graphics context. –  trashgod Dec 13 '11 at 2:53
1  
@trashgod, In this case, there really isn't a reason to clone the graphics object, but I was trying to reinforce good practice. As for invoking super.paintComponent, you're absolutely right. It's been a long day. –  mre Dec 13 '11 at 2:56
    
well ... "good practice" depends on context and its competing constraints ;-) The force to clone the graphics is to return it in the same state you got it. The more general force (for code sanity) is to not clutter any code by unnessary lines. So if the first doesn't exist (trivially, as there is no change whatever) the second can flourish fully. In other words: you would have a hard task to pass that snippet through my review :-) –  kleopatra Dec 13 '11 at 11:59
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