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#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int x;
    float peri ,area1;
    scanf("%d",&x);
    area(x, &peri, &area1);
    printf(" %f %f ", peri, area1);
    return 0;
}

int area(int r, float *per, float *are)
{
    *per = 2.0 * r;
    *are = 3.14 * r * r;
}

This works fine but when I try to change the input value to float

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    float x, peri, area1;
    scanf("%f",&x);
    float area(x, &peri, &area1);
    printf(" %f %f ", peri, area1);
    return 0;
}

float area(float r, float *per, float *are)
{
    *per = 2.0 * r;
    *are = 3.14 * r * r;
}

I get:

error: expected ')' before '&' token

share|improve this question
    
i want to know but for int i don't have to declare such a function outside main why is that so –  the new in area Dec 13 '11 at 4:28
    
You should change the floating point literals 2.0 etc to 2.0f. 2.0 means double type, 2.0f means float type. In case of the former, you enforce the compiler to convert your float to a double before calculating, then round it down into a float once more, possibly resulting in less efficient code. –  Lundin Dec 13 '11 at 7:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
 float area( x, &peri, &area1);

should be

area( x, &peri, &area1);

You don't need to specify the return type when you are calling the function.

Also since the return type now is non-int you need to either:

  1. Move the function definition before main.
  2. Provide a function declaration like:

    float area(float, float *, float *);
    

    before main.

Also since you are not returning anything from the function you should be making its return type as void.

share|improve this answer
    
I suspect that a function that is declared to return something, but doesn't, invokes undefined behavior. –  Lundin Dec 13 '11 at 7:30
float area( x, &peri, &area1); 

declares a function, While what you are trying to do is to call the function so it should be:

area( x, &peri, &area1); 
share|improve this answer

another thing here.... rather than passing by reference, if you separate out your calculations into different functions...

your area function should turn into (and be declared above your main function) :-

float area_of_circle( float radius)
{
   return 3.14 * radius * radius;
}

float perimeter_of_circle(float radius)
{
   return 2 * 3.14 * radius;
}

then in your main code

peri = perimeter_of_circle(x);
area1 = area_of_circle(x); 

Note, I also fixed the bug in calculating a perimeter.

Basically a function should do one thing, and do it well.

Ideally you'd also make a #define (or #include an existing definition) for pi.

also, your scanfing for a int, you may want to get a float.

another general commentary on coding, don't be a lazy ass with naming things. Not only does naming things help it be readable. It actually helps you be clear in your mind what you are trying to do. In fact sometimes by agonizing over what to name something, you end up with clarity of thought, which translates into simple useful abstract concepts in the code. Which leads to better designs.

share|improve this answer

You need to remove the keyword float from this line

float area( x, &peri, &area1);
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