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I've run into interesting thing (works same in both Java and C#). Java code:

public class TestStuff {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Printer p = new PrinterImpl();
        p.genericPrint(new B());    
    }

}

class PrinterImpl implements Printer {

    void print(A a) {
        System.out.println("a");
    }

    void print(B b) {
        System.out.println("b");
    }

    @Override
    public <T extends A> void genericPrint(T b) {
        print(b);
    }

}

interface Printer {
    public <T extends A> void genericPrint(T a);
}

class A {

}

class B extends A{

}

C# code:

namespace TestStuff
{
    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var printer = new Printer();
            printer.GenericPrint(new B());
        }

    }

    public class Printer
    {

        public void Print(A a)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("a");
        }

        public void Print(B b)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("b");
        }

        public void GenericPrint<T>(T a) where T : A
        {
            Print(a);
        }

    }

    public class B : A
    {

    }

    public class A
    {

    }

}

When I wrote something like this I expected to see "b" printed in both cases. But, as you can see, it is "a" what is printed.

I've read C# language specification and it says overloaded method is selected at compile-time. It explains why it works that way.

However, I had no time to check it out in Java language specification.

Could somebody please give a more detailed explanation of what is happening and why? And how could I achieve what I wanted?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
Your question doesn't actually need to involve generics. Define a method that takes an Object parameter, and overload it with a method taking a String instead. Then declare a variable of type Object and set it to a String. See which overload is called when passing that variable in - it's the same behavior. –  Paul Bellora Dec 13 '11 at 4:56
    
Kublai Khan, it's not about this example. =) –  Sergey A. Savenko Dec 13 '11 at 5:03
    
Understood, I noticed you're after solving a specific issue here, but the question made it sound like you were interested in the behavior. Just pointing out how it can be reduced. –  Paul Bellora Dec 13 '11 at 5:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The key is to understand that generics are only available at compile time in java. It is just syntax sugar that the compiler uses while compiling, but throws away while generating the class files.

As such, the code:

   public <T extends A> void genericPrint(T b) {
      print(b);
   }

is compiled into:

   public void genericPrint(A b) {
      print(b);
   }

Since the argument to print is of type A, the overloaded version print(A a) is the one resolved. I'd suggest using polymorphic calls on instances of A or the Visitor pattern to callback into PrinterImpl for your use case.

Something like:

interface Visitor {
   void visit(A a);

   void visit(B b);
}

class PrinterImpl implements Printer, Visitor {

   void print(A a) {
      System.out.println("a");
   }

   void print(B b) {
      System.out.println("b");
   }

   public <T extends A> void genericPrint(T b) {
      b.accept(this);
   }

   public void visit(A a) {
      print(a);
   }

   public void visit(B b) {
      print(b);
   }
}

interface Printer {
   public <T extends A> void genericPrint(T a);
}

class A {
   public void accept(Visitor v) {
      v.visit(this);
   }
}

class B extends A {
   public void accept(Visitor v) {
      v.visit(this);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, that's pretty cool. Interesting pattern =) Haven't seen it before –  Sergey A. Savenko Dec 13 '11 at 5:27
    
@Dead_ok added a link to the visitor pattern on wikipedia –  shams Dec 13 '11 at 5:30
    
Thank you, shams –  Sergey A. Savenko Dec 13 '11 at 5:39

Its true that overloaded methods are selected at compile time and its true for java also(dynamic method dispatch). However Generics works a little differently. Your method GenericPrinter can only work Types A or its derivative. Its a constraint on that method. Suppose in your GenricPrinter class you have invoked a method thats defined in A.

public class A
{
    void DoSomethingA()
    {
    }    
}
.
.
.
public void GenericPrint<T>(T a) where T : A
{
    //constraint makes sure this is always valid
    a.DoSomethingA();
    Print(a);
}

So this constraint would make sure that only A or its sub classes, that contains the above method would only be allowed. Although you pass in an instance of A's subclass but due to constaint, GenericPrinter would treat the subclass as A. Just remove the constraint part (T:A) and B would be printed as you expect.

share|improve this answer
2  
There will be no appropriate Print method if he removes that constraint. –  Matthias Dec 13 '11 at 4:47
    
what about Print(B b) ? –  Anand Dec 13 '11 at 4:48
    
If constraint is removed, a is simply of base type object. –  Matthias Dec 13 '11 at 4:52
    
Matthias is right, no appropriate metod will be found. Although, if you provide Print(Object o), it will be called always. –  Sergey A. Savenko Dec 13 '11 at 4:55
    
Yes, realised my mistake. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Anand Dec 13 '11 at 4:59

There is no runtime check of which type a is in your GenericPrint method. The only thing you enforce with the where T : A part, is that you can call Print.

Btw, apart from that generic method: If you want a to be printed, although it is an instance of B, then you have to declare that variable as A obj = new B().

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed, that's what I said earlier. But what about achieving of desired behaviour? –  Sergey A. Savenko Dec 13 '11 at 4:41
    
But I don't understand why you need that GenericPrint method? Polymorphism should be sufficient enough. –  Matthias Dec 13 '11 at 4:42
    
The point is I had an interface which defines a method which takes implementations of a specific interface as an argument. What I want is to change behaviour, depending on what type was actually passed. And I don't want to use instanceOf() =). I know it's a bad practice, but it could help me save some resources, as method implementation could be much more efficient for specific types which implement the interface. –  Sergey A. Savenko Dec 13 '11 at 4:46
    
The only other solution, is to adjust the calls to this method, and cast to the concrete implementation. Then provide different methods for that implementations. –  Matthias Dec 13 '11 at 4:54
1  
@MatthiasKoch you can use the visitor pattern to avoid casts in your calls :) –  shams Dec 13 '11 at 5:33

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