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I want to add a test to my Perl distribution that requires a module Foo, but my distribution does not require Foo; only the test requires Foo. So I don't want to add the module to the dependencies, but instead I just want to skip the tests that require Foo if Foo is not available at build time.

What is the proper way to do this? Should I just wrap my Foo tests in an eval block along with use Foo;, so that the tests will not run if loading Foo fails? Or is there a more elegant way of doing it?

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What test module are you using? –  Pradeep Dec 13 '11 at 5:51
    
I'm using Test::More, but feel free to suggest another one if it has this feature. –  Ryan Thompson Dec 13 '11 at 5:54
    
Look at the answers below but reading the old good documentation of the module you are using should be the first option :-) –  Matteo Dec 13 '11 at 6:26
    
Yeah, once I knew that the feature I wanted was called "skipping", I found it in the docs. I was searching for more complicated things like "conditional execution". –  Ryan Thompson Dec 13 '11 at 19:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Test::More has an option to skip if some condition is not satisfied, see below

SKIP: {
    eval { require Foo };

    skip "Foo not installed", 2 if $@;

    ## do something if Foo is installed
};
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Nice and simple. Now that I know about the "skip" function in Test::More, I found the section about it in the docs. Thanks! –  Ryan Thompson Dec 13 '11 at 6:27
    
You are welcome :-) –  Pradeep Dec 13 '11 at 6:29
1  
eval { require Foo } or skip ... ; –  Brad Gilbert Dec 14 '11 at 22:30

If all of the tests that require Some::Module are in a single file, it's easy to do:

use Test::More;

BEGIN {
    eval {
        require Some::Module;
        1;
    } or do {
        plan skip_all => "Some::Module is not available";
    };
}

(If you're using a test count like use Test::More tests => 42; then you need to also arrange to do plan tests => 42; if the require does succeed.)

If they're a smaller number of tests in a file that contains other stuff, then you could do something like:

our $HAVE_SOME_MODULE = 0;

BEGIN {
    eval {
        require Some::Module;
        $HAVE_SOME_MODULE = 1;
    };
}

# ... some other tests here

SKIP: {
    skip "Some::Module is not available", $num_skipped unless $HAVE_SOME_MODULE;
    # ... tests using Some::Module here
}
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From the documentation of Test::More:

SKIP: {
    eval { require HTML::Lint };
    skip "HTML::Lint not installed", 2 if $@;
    my $lint = new HTML::Lint;
    isa_ok( $lint, "HTML::Lint" );
    $lint->parse( $html );
    is( $lint->errors, 0, "No errors found in HTML" );
}
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Also, declare your test step requirement or recommendation (there's a difference) in the distro meta file. This will be picked up by a client performing the installation. At install time, the user can decide whether to install such a requirement permanently or discard it because it was only used for testing.

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It seems like the Test::More::skip approach and your answer are complementary. The skip function allows me to skip tests that require a module that is unavailable, while your answer allows me to recommend that the client install the module without making it a hard dependency. If the client that is installing my dist decides not to install the optional testing dependency, will it then skip all the tests? Or will it somehow know which tests depend on that optional module and automatically skip only those? –  Ryan Thompson Dec 13 '11 at 19:49
    
Or, to put it more simply, declaring an optional dependency is definitely something that I will do, but I don't see how it frees me from the obligation to handle the case where that optional module is not installed. –  Ryan Thompson Dec 13 '11 at 19:56
    
Not quite, if it's a test requirement then it will be available. But I realise now that's not what the question is about, I misinterpreted what you meant with optional. You are right that the skip check is necessary in that case; I edited the answer to make it so. –  daxim Dec 13 '11 at 20:03

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