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I'm trying to do some pagination when user scrolls to the bottom of the page, more content loads. Is there a way to get to say almost to the bottom of the page? Like maybe 1/3 from the bottom of the page?

$(window).scroll(function(){
    if ($(window).scrollTop() == ($(document).height() - $(window).height())/3)
    {
        alert('test');
    }
    // ...

This doesn't do anything

But if I delete that 3 in the code, alert pops when I get at the bottom (dead end, cant scroll anymore). But I want the alert to show when I'm almost to the bottom.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is:

  • You check if it is exactly equal. This is going to be rare
  • You check if it is 1/3rd down the page, not 2/3rds

Try this - http://jsfiddle.net/y7Am2/:

$(window).scroll(function(){
    var mostOfTheWayDown = ($(document).height() - $(window).height()) * 2 / 3;
    if ($(window).scrollTop() >= mostOfTheWayDown)
    {
        alert('test');
    }
});

But I recommend you use a specific pixel value from the bottom rather than a fractional value from the top. Base it on the height of your footer (a simple hand-tweaked value, or calculated).

Your content might not be constant height. If not, and you use a fractional value, you will scroll to what seems like an arbitrary part of the page and the loading will queue. This will make your website seem unpredictable, or possibly less responsive if users are used to it loading earlier on longer pages.

So do something like this instead - http://jsfiddle.net/PwZ4D/:

$(window).scroll(function(){
    var mostOfTheWayDown = ($(document).height() - $(window).height())
        - 150 - footerHeight;
    // ...

Also note that as currently implemented your event will keep firing every time you scroll around at the bottom of the page. This will queue up a whole ton of AJAX calls. You probably should unbind scroll inside your event, then rebind it when your ajax call finishes successfully.

And be careful to handle cases where you have little to no content. If a page is empty or there is only enough data to fill one screen, it could keep re-querying the server needlessly if you do things wrong.

Edit:

Per request, you unbind the scroll event with code like this - http://jsfiddle.net/5vXJ5/:

$(window).unbind('scroll');

Edit:

Again per request, you rebind it the same way you bound it to begin with. However, since you end up with self-referential code you'll need to name your function. The final code might look something like this:

var scrollHandler;
scrollHandler = function(){
  var mostOfTheWayDown = ($(document).height() - $(window).height()) * 2 / 3;

  if ($(window).scrollTop() >= mostOfTheWayDown)
  {
    // So we don't queue up multiple requests until the first one completes
    $(window).unbind('scroll');

    $.ajax({
      url: "test.html",
      context: document.body,
      success: function(){
        $(window).scroll(scrollHandler); // re-bind after it completes
      }
    });
  }
};

$(window).scroll(scrollHandler); // bind by named function

This is just an example though. You'll have to tweak it to your specific scenario.

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Great answer! Thanks!! Also, is there an example of how I should unbind/bind? Thanks again! –  andrewliu Dec 13 '11 at 7:15
    
@andrewliu: YW. For you, anything :) </joking>. Give me a few minutes... –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Dec 13 '11 at 7:44
    
woot! best answer best answer! Thanks –  andrewliu Dec 13 '11 at 16:10
    
@MerlynMorgan-Graham, how do I rebind it? inserting $(window).bind('scroll'); in the ajax success part doesn't work. –  Pineapple Under the Sea Feb 12 '12 at 12:37
    
@user1099531: You bind it the same way you bound it to begin with - $(window).scroll(...). If you do this, I recommend you name the function rather than using an anonymous function: var scrollHandler = function() { /* ... */ }; $(window).scroll(scrollHandler);. Then inside the ajax call you'd simply do $(window).scroll(scrollHandler); again. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Feb 13 '12 at 0:40
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I think the calculation below should be more correct for what you are seeking for the case window.scrollTop max is document.height - window.height:

$(window).scrollTop() = $(document).height() - $(window).height() - $(window).height())/3
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You can either use a plugin such as

Endless Scroll or Infinite Scroll

Or simply write your own

$(window).scroll(function () { 
   if ($(window).scrollTop() >= ($(document).height() - $(window).height()) - 100) {
      console.log('load more!')
   }
});
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