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I have my javascript file:

foo.js

var FooNS = {
   T:5,
   S: FooNS.T+5, //ERROR1
   doSomething : function(adder)
   {
     //Do Something here.
   }
};

This is my other js file:

useFoo.js

$(document).ready(function()
{
    FooNS.doSomething(5); //ERROR2
});

These are the two Javascript errors (via Chrome Inspector), that I get on my page which includes the js(s):

  • ERROR1 -> Uncaught TypeError: Cannot read property 'T' of undefined (foo.js)
  • ERROR2 -> Uncaught TypeError: Cannot call method 'doSomething' of undefined (in useFoo.js)

I am not able to figure out the reason for these errors/ the correct usage of namespaces. Any suggestions?

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

T doesn't exist as a global variable, which is how you are trying to use it.

var FooNS = {
   T:5,
   S: T+5, // <-- here you are trying to access the global variable T
   doSomething : function(adder)
   {
     //Do Something here.
   }
};

What you are looking for is probably something akin to this:

var FooNS = {
   T:5,
   doSomething : function(adder)
   {
     //Do Something here.
   }
};

FooNS.S = FooNS.T+5;

The second error is because FooNS is never created as an object due to the first error, thus FooNS is undefined.

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sorry, missed that while typing the question in SO. I have updated my question. –  TJ- Dec 13 '11 at 6:38
    
Look at my updated answer –  Martin Jespersen Dec 13 '11 at 6:46
    
Yes, that was the thing. Thanks. –  TJ- Dec 13 '11 at 6:50
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Cause for ERROR1:

You are trying to access a property of an object that has not been completely instantiated. The creation of FooNS is complete only after the browser (interpreter) executes line 8 in your script (i.e. };).

For initializing the properties, it might be better to use an init member function or something, and call that the definition of FooNS like:

var FooNS = {
   T: 5,
   S: 0,
   init: function() {
      this.S = this.T + 5; // this does not get executed till we call init(), so no error here
   },
   ...
}; // <- creation of FooNS object is complete
FooNS.init();

Cause for ERROR2:

The browser halts at the first error (ERROR1) and does not execute any more JS in that thread of execution. Because of this, the FooNS object does not get created correctly resulting in an error when you call FooNS.doSomething(5)

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Thanks for the explanation. –  TJ- Dec 13 '11 at 7:37
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