Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using the new auto keyword has degraded my code execution times. I narrowed the problem to the following simple code snippet:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <deque>
#include <time.h>

using namespace std;

void func1(map<int, vector<deque<float>>>& m)
{
    vector<deque<float>>& v = m[1];
}

void func2(map<int, vector<deque<float>>>& m)
{
    auto v = m[1];
}

void main () {

    map<int, vector<deque<float>>> m;
    m[1].push_back(deque<float>(1000,1));

    clock_t begin=clock();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i) func1(m);
    cout << "100000 x func1: " << (((double)(clock() - begin))/CLOCKS_PER_SEC) << " sec." << endl;

    begin=clock();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i) func2(m);
    cout << "100000 x func2: " << (((double)(clock() - begin))/CLOCKS_PER_SEC) << " sec." << endl;

}

The output I get on my i7 / Win7 machine (Release mode; VS2010) is:

100000 x func1: 0.001 sec.
100000 x func2: 3.484 sec.

Can anyone explain why using auto results in such a different execution times?

Obviously, there is a simple workaround, i.e., stop using auto altogether, but I hope there is a better way to overcome this issue.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You are copying the vector to v.

Try this instead to create a reference

auto& v = ...
share|improve this answer
    
Damn, you have to be really fast to answer those questions. ;-) –  Andre Dec 13 '11 at 7:37
    
I thought (but I guess I was wrong) that auto uses the return type of the function. The return type of operator[] is reference so why do we need to add the extra '&' ? –  MDman Dec 13 '11 at 7:42
12  
@MDman: auto removes top-level cv and reference, it "decays" the deduced type. –  Xeo Dec 13 '11 at 7:46
5  
@MDman: Also, how would you ever be able to create a copy if the deduced type was always exactly the type of the expression? :) I think that was one of the rationales for having auto behave this way. –  Xeo Dec 13 '11 at 10:26

As Bo said, you have to use auto& instead of auto (Note, that there is also auto* for other cases). Here is an updated version of your code:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>
#include <deque>
#include <time.h>

using namespace std;

typedef map<int, vector<deque<float>>> FooType; // this should have a meaningful name

void func1(FooType& m)
{
    vector<deque<float>>& v = m[1];
}

void func2(FooType& m)
{
    auto v = m[1];
}

void func3(FooType& m)
{
    auto& v = m[1];
}

void measure_time(std::function<void(FooType&)> func, FooType& m)
{
    clock_t begin=clock();
    for(int i = 0; i < 100000; ++i) func(m);
    cout << "100000 x func: " << (((double)(clock() - begin))/CLOCKS_PER_SEC) << " sec." << endl;
}

void main()
{
    FooType m;
    m[1].push_back(deque<float>(1000,1));

    measure_time(func1, m);
    measure_time(func2, m);
    measure_time(func3, m);
}

On my computer, it gives the following output:

100000 x func: 0 sec.
100000 x func: 3.136 sec.
100000 x func: 0 sec.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.