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I want to replace only the first instance if two matches returned.

example:

$sen = "The quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog, fox is quick";

how can i match only the first fox and replace it with wolf and vice versa.

Output:

The quick brown wolf jump over the lazy dog, fox is quick 

or:

The quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog, wolf is quick 

Thanks.

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I was with you all the way up to "and vice versa". –  TLP Dec 13 '11 at 8:01
    
vice versa means if i want to replace only the second instance. –  aliocee Dec 13 '11 at 8:03
    
Does it have to be exactly two instances, or should the substitution occur if there are more than two? –  ikegami Dec 13 '11 at 8:15
    
Yeah, I know. Perhaps your question should have been "...and replace only one of them". –  TLP Dec 13 '11 at 8:18
    
@ikegami - it can be more than two. and please can you show me better way to match and count the instances. –  aliocee Dec 13 '11 at 8:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Counting matches by using global option /g, assign list of matches to an empty list to get a count (better than a temp variable). First replace is basic. Second uses a counter that increments for each match, and replaces at the proper time.

Note use of word border \b to prevent false matches, such as firefox, foxy lady, etc.

Code:

use strict;
use warnings;
use v5.10;   # only required for say, use print instead if your version is lower

my $fox  = 'fox';
my $wolf = 'wolf';
my $sen = "The quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog, fox is quick";

if ((()=$sen =~ /\b$fox\b/g) == 2) {   # counting matches 
    my $first = $sen;
    $first =~ s/\b$fox\b/$wolf/;       # replacing first
    my $second = $sen;
    my $i = 0;
    $second =~ s/\b$fox\b/ ++$i == 2 ? $wolf : $fox/eg;  # replacing second
    say for $first, $second;
}

Output:

The quick brown wolf jump over the lazy dog, fox is quick
The quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog, wolf is quick

If you wish a more reusable code, you can make a subroutine out of it.

my $second = replace_nr($sen, $fox, $wolf, 2);
...
sub replace_nr {
    my ($str, $find, $replace, $num) = @_;
    my $i = 0;
    $str =~ s/\b($find)\b/ ++$i == $num ? $replace : $find/eg;
    return $str;
}

You could then even use the sub for both substitutions:

my $first  = replace_nr($sen, $fox, $wolf, 1);
my $second = replace_nr($sen, $fox, $wolf, 2);
share|improve this answer
    
can i pass 3 as argument? –  aliocee Dec 13 '11 at 9:02
    
@aliocee Yes you can. But it will not replace anything if there are not 3 matches. –  TLP Dec 13 '11 at 9:05
    
at TLP: Can my match string contain fox|dog to be replace with wolf? –  aliocee Dec 13 '11 at 9:11
    
@aliocee It can, but then you'd need to surround $find with parens, i.e. s/\b($find)\b/... –  TLP Dec 13 '11 at 9:13
    
at TLP: thanks alot you've made my day! –  aliocee Dec 13 '11 at 9:15

To check if there are (at least) two and replace the first:

# The quick brown *wolf* jump over the lazy dog, fox is quick
s/fox(?=.*fox)/wolf/s;

To check if there are (at least) two and replace the second:

# The quick brown fox jump over the lazy dog, *wolf* is quick:
s/fox.*\Kfox/wolf/s;

s/(fox.*)fox/${1}wolf/s;  # Slower, but works pre 5.10
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the instances can be more than two, please can you suggest a better way of matching the instance for me? –  aliocee Dec 13 '11 at 8:36
    
Good use of lookahead. –  kshenoy Dec 13 '11 at 17:08
    
@aliocee, "the instance" makes no sense if there are three instances. –  ikegami Dec 13 '11 at 18:49

By default, the substitution operator does exactly that: match and replace the first occurence.

The following statement will get you your first output line:

s/wolf/fox/
share|improve this answer
    
what about if i want to match the second first? –  aliocee Dec 13 '11 at 8:01
    
@aliocee well, you'd have to find another pattern. –  JB. Dec 13 '11 at 9:21

Your new question is that you want the count

my $count = () = $text =~ /fox/g;

and to replace the Nth instance

my $n = 3;
my $nm1 = $n-1;
$text =~ s/(?:fox.*){$nm1}\Kfox/s;
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