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How to rewrite the following code to use in .NET 2.0?

// Using dynamic (.Net 4.0 only)
var client = new FacebookClient();
dynamic me = client.Get("me");
string firstName = me.first_name;
string lastName = me.last_name;
string email = me.email;

// Using IDictionary<string, object> (.Net 3.5, .Net 4.0, WP7)
var client = new FacebookClient();
var me = (IDictionary<string,object>)client.Get("me");
string firstName = (string)me["first_name"];
string lastName = (string)me["last_name"];
string email = (string)me["email"];
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closed as not a real question by Mitch Wheat, Filip Ekberg, Waqas, Pratik, Fischermaen Dec 13 '11 at 8:14

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7  
write the code and after you see that it doesn't works, ask for help! this community is here to help, not to do your job –  Buda Gavril Dec 13 '11 at 8:03
3  
1. Cut the first line into the .NET 2.0 project. 2. Compile. 3. Fix errors. 4. GoTo 1. –  Filip Ekberg Dec 13 '11 at 8:05
    
IDictionary<,> is fine in 2.0 –  Marc Gravell Dec 13 '11 at 8:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Shoulbn't be that hard to figure out but here:

//instead of var use the actual type
FacebookClient client = new FacebookClient();
//again use the actual type
IDictionary<string, object> me = (IDictionary<string, object>)client.Get("me");
string firstName = (string)me["first_name"]; //May use 'me["first_name"].ToString()'
string lastName = (string)me["last_name"];
string email = (string)me["email"];
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The template classes can be replaced with their non-generic counterparts. Use Object type collections with casting. Assuming that's your compile issue.

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2  
.NET 2.0 has generics –  Filip Ekberg Dec 13 '11 at 8:04
    
Well I don't feel like guessing what doesn't work for him :P –  chaz Dec 13 '11 at 8:10
    
"// Using dynamic (.Net 4.0 only)" is the main issue, I suspect; although to be fair, the second such comment (about dictionary) is incorrect –  Marc Gravell Dec 13 '11 at 8:13
    
I guess that's a bad on my part. At least generics didn't exist at some point. (C# 1.1?) –  chaz Dec 13 '11 at 8:20

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