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Lets say I have an numpy array a:

a = np.array([[1,2,3],[2,3,4]])

And I would like to add a column of zeros to get array b:

b = np.array([[1,2,3,0],[2,3,4,0]])

How can I do this easily in numpy?

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7 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I think a more straightforward solution and faster to boot is to do the following:

import numpy as np
N = 10
a = np.random.rand((N,N))
b = np.zeros((N,N+1))
b[:,:-1] = a

And timings:

In [23]: N = 10

In [24]: a = np.random.rand(N,N)

In [25]: %timeit b = np.hstack((a,np.zeros((a.shape[0],1))))
10000 loops, best of 3: 19.6 us per loop

In [27]: %timeit b = np.zeros((a.shape[0],a.shape[1]+1)); b[:,:-1] = a
100000 loops, best of 3: 5.62 us per loop
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np.r_[ ... ] and np.c_[ ... ] are useful alternatives to vstack and hstack, with square brackets [] instead of round ().
A couple of examples:

: import numpy as np
: N = 3
: A = np.eye(N)

: np.c_[ A, np.ones(N) ]              # add a column
array([[ 1.,  0.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 0.,  1.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.,  1.]])

: np.c_[ np.ones(N), A, np.ones(N) ]  # or two
array([[ 1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  0.,  1.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  1.]])

: np.r_[ A, [A[1]] ]              # add a row
array([[ 1.,  0.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  1.,  0.],
       [ 0.,  0.,  1.],
       [ 0.,  1.,  0.]])
: # not np.r_[ A, A[1] ]

: np.r_[ A[0], 1, 2, 3, A[1] ]    # mix vecs and scalars
  array([ 1.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  0.,  1.,  0.])

: np.r_[ A[0], [1, 2, 3], A[1] ]  # lists
  array([ 1.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  0.,  1.,  0.])

: np.r_[ A[0], (1, 2, 3), A[1] ]  # tuples
  array([ 1.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  0.,  1.,  0.])

: np.r_[ A[0], 1:4, A[1] ]        # same, 1:4 == arange(1,4) == 1,2,3
  array([ 1.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  2.,  3.,  0.,  1.,  0.])

(The reason for square brackets [] instead of round () is that Python expands e.g. 1:4 in square -- the wonders of overloading.)

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While writing the question I came up with one way, using hstack

b = np.hstack((a, np.zeros((a.shape[0], 1), dtype=a.dtype)))

Any other (more elegant solutions) welcome!

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I think this is the most elegant solution. –  silvado Dec 13 '11 at 8:44
1  
+1 - this is how I would do it - you beat me to posting it as an answer :). –  Blair Dec 13 '11 at 8:45
2  
Remove the dtype parameter, it is not needed and even not allowed. While your solution is elegant enough, pay attention not to use it if you need to "append" frequently to an array. If you cannot create the whole array at once and fill it later, create a list of arrays and hstack it all at once. –  eumiro Dec 13 '11 at 9:38
    
@eumiro I'm not sure how I managed to get the dtype at the wrong location, but the np.zeros needs a dtype to avoid everything becoming float (while a is int) –  Peter Smit Dec 13 '11 at 10:59
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What I find most elegant is the following:

b = np.insert(a, 3, values=0, axis=1) # insert values before column 3

An advantage of insert is that it also allows you to insert columns (or rows) at other places inside the array. Also instead of inserting a single value you can easily insert a whole vector, for instance doublicate the last column:

b = np.insert(a, insert_index, values=a[:,2], axis=1)

Which leads to:

array([[1, 2, 3, 3],
       [2, 3, 4, 4]])

For the timing, insert might be slower than JoshAdel's solution:

In [1]: N = 10

In [2]: a = np.random.rand(N,N)

In [3]: %timeit b = np.hstack((a,np.zeros((a.shape[0],1))))
100000 loops, best of 3: 7.5 us per loop

In [4]: %timeit b = np.zeros((a.shape[0],a.shape[1]+1)); b[:,:-1] = a
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.17 us per loop

In [5]: %timeit b = np.insert(a, 3, values=0, axis=1)
100000 loops, best of 3: 10.2 us per loop
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This is pretty neat. Too bad I can't do insert(a, -1, ...) to append the column. Guess I'll just prepend it instead. –  Thomas Ahle Mar 14 at 13:37
    
You can do insert(a, insert_index=0, ...) to prepend a column. Values are added before the index. –  Björn Apr 7 at 13:22
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I think:

np.column_stack((a, zeros(shape(a)[0])))

is more elegant.

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I like JoshAdel's answer because of the focus on performance. A minor performance improvement is to avoid the overhead of initializing with zeros, only to be overwritten. This has a measurable difference when N is large, empty is used instead of zeros, and the column of zeros is written as a separate step:

In [1]: import numpy as np

In [2]: N = 10000

In [3]: a = np.ones((N,N))

In [4]: %timeit b = np.zeros((a.shape[0],a.shape[1]+1)); b[:,:-1] = a
1 loops, best of 3: 492 ms per loop

In [5]: %timeit b = np.empty((a.shape[0],a.shape[1]+1)); b[:,:-1] = a; b[:,-1] = np.zeros((a.shape[0],))
1 loops, best of 3: 407 ms per loop
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Use numpy.append:

>>> a = np.array([[1,2,3],[2,3,4]])
>>> a
array([[1, 2, 3],
       [2, 3, 4]])

>>> z = np.zeros((2,1), dtype=int64)
>>> z
array([[0],
       [0]])

>>> np.append(a, z, axis=1)
array([[1, 2, 3, 0],
       [2, 3, 4, 0]])
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This is nice when inserting more complicated columns. –  Thomas Ahle Mar 14 at 13:38
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