Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

a review problem lists these registers in hex:

cs = ????  sp = 0300  ax = a66a  ip = 01cf
ds = 4100  bp = 0003  bx = 1234  
ss = 48ee  si = 0100  cx = 00ff
es = 4cee  di = 1000  dx = 0000
  1. The absolute address of the next instruction to be executed is 40f0f.

    40f0f  
    -01cf
    _____
    40d40 / 10 = 40d4 = cs
    
  2. Is the size of the data segment in bytes always equal to the stack segment minus the data segment * 10? 48ee - 4100 = 7ee0. Likewise, is the code segment in bytes always equal to the data segment minus the code segment * 10? 48ee - 40d4 = 81a0.

  3. For mov cx,[bx + si], the absolute address of the source operand is 42334.

    bx = 1234
    si = 0100
    _________
         1334
    
    ds = 4100 * 10 = 41000 + 1334 = 42334
    
  4. For mov cx,[di - 4], the absolute address of the source operand is 41ffc.

    di = 1000
         -  4
    _________
         0FFC
    
    ds = 4100 * 10 = 41000 + 0ffc = 41ffc
    
  5. For mov cx,[bp + si - 3], the absolute address of the source operand is 48fe0.

    bp = 0003
    si = 0100
          - 3
    _________
         0100
    
    ss = 48ee * 10 = 48ee0 + 0100 = 48fe0
    

Am I going about solving these the right way? How do I know when to use the stack segment for these calculations and when to use the data segment?

share|improve this question
    
Really? Someone's still teaching these antiquated concepts? Segmentation died out years ago, unless you're operating in embedded space, I guess, or you're taking some sort of Computer History class :-) –  paxdiablo Dec 13 '11 at 9:33
    
Assembly language seems close enough to a computer history class. –  raphnguyen Dec 13 '11 at 9:38
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For address calculations involving bp or sp or stack operations like push or pop the segment register is implicitly ss, for other addresses ds. Exception: If you use a string instruction, the destination segment register is implicitly es.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.