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I have a multithreaded application, where a shared list has write-often, read-occasionally behaviour.

Specifically, many threads will dump data into the list, and then - later - another worker will grab a snapshot to persist to a datastore.

This is similar to the discussion over on this question.

There, the following solution is provided:

class CopyOnReadList<T> {

    private final List<T> items = new ArrayList<T>();

    public void add(T item) {
        synchronized (items) {
            // Add item while holding the lock.
            items.add(item);
        }
    }

    public List<T> makeSnapshot() {
        List<T> copy = new ArrayList<T>();
        synchronized (items) {
            // Make a copy while holding the lock.
            for (T t : items) copy.add(t);
        }
        return copy;
    }

}

However, in this scenario, (and, as I've learned from my question here), only one thread can write to the backing list at any given time.

Is there a way to allow high-concurrency writes to the backing list, which are locked only during the makeSnapshot() call?

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1  
Why don't you just use a ConcurrentLinkedQueue? docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… –  JB Nizet Dec 13 '11 at 10:10
    
Do you know you are writing items fast enough to need concurrent access. i.e. tens of millions per second? I suspect you have less than a million per second. ;) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 13 '11 at 10:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

synchronized (~20 ns) is pretty fast and even though other operations can allow concurrency, they can be slower.

private final Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();
private List<T> items = new ArrayList<T>();

public void add(T item) {
    lock.lock();
    // trivial lock time.
    try {
        // Add item while holding the lock.
        items.add(item);
    } finally {
        lock.unlock();
    }
}

public List<T> makeSnapshot() {
    List<T> copy = new ArrayList<T>(), ret;
    lock.lock();
    // trivial lock time.
    try {
        ret = items;
        items = copy;
    } finally {
        lock.unlock();
    }
    return ret;
}

public static void main(String... args) {
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    Main<Integer> ints = new Main<>();
    for (int j = 0; j < 100 * 1000; j++) {
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000; i++)
            ints.add(i);
        ints.makeSnapshot();
    }
    long time = System.nanoTime() - start;
    System.out.printf("The average time to add was %,d ns%n", time / 100 / 1000 / 1000);
}

prints

The average time to add was 28 ns

This means if you are creating 30 million entries per second, you will have one thread accessing the list on average. If you are creating 60 million per second, you will have concurrency issues, however you are likely to be having many more resourcing issue at this point.

Using Lock.lock() and Lock.unlock() can be faster when there is a high contention ratio. However, I suspect your threads will be spending most of the time building the objects to be created rather than waiting to add the objects.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a brilliant answer. I must confess my goal here is to improve my understanding of issues around concurrency. Concurrency Lesson #1: Premature optimisation is still a dumb idea. –  Marty Pitt Dec 13 '11 at 10:31
    
The main lesson is to measure first, because your assumption on what should be best is so often wrong, even if you have been performance tuning systems for over ten years. ;) The problem with Premature Optimisation is that the JVM optimises common/simple idioms. This means your hand optimisations can be slower as they confuse the JVM and you get a worse result (and unless you also measure to prove its faster, you just don't realise) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 13 '11 at 10:34
    
Good answer, +1. Speaking of why premature optimization is bad, there is also no single "correct" way to do concurrency - what's fastest depends entirely on the scenario (typically, the contention level). What's ideal for one case can be completely wrong in another case. –  gustafc Dec 13 '11 at 16:10
    
What can improve performance (at the cost of complexity) in Java 5.0 may not help much in Java 6 (but its still complex) –  Peter Lawrey Dec 13 '11 at 16:47
    
Your solution with locks still suffers from the problem of only one thread being able to write to the original backing list. –  shams Dec 13 '11 at 21:42

You could use a ConcurrentDoublyLinkedList. There is an excellent implementation here ConcurrentDoublyLinkedList.

So long as you iterate forward through the list when you make your snapshot all should be well. This implementation preserves the forward chain at all times. The backward chain is sometimes inaccurate.

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First of all, you should investigate if this really is too slow. Adds to ArrayLists are O(1) in the happy case, so if the list has an appropriate initial size, CopyOnReadList.add is basically just a bounds check and an assignment to an array slot, which is pretty fast. (And please, do remember that CopyOnReadList was written to be understandable, not performant.)

If you need a non-locking operation, you can have something like this:

class ConcurrentStack<T> {
    private final AtomicReference<Node<T>> stack = new AtomicReference<>();

    public void add(T value){
        Node<T> tail, head;
        do {
            tail = stack.get();
            head = new Node<>(value, tail);
        } while (!stack.compareAndSet(tail, head));
    }
    public Node<T> drain(){
        // Get all elements from the stack and reset it
        return stack.getAndSet(null);
    }
}
class Node<T> {
    // getters, setters, constructors omitted
    private final T value;
    private final Node<T> tail;
}

Note that while adds to this structure should deal pretty well with high contention, it comes with several drawbacks. The output from drain is quite slow to iterate over, it uses quite a lot of memory (like all linked lists), and you also get things in the opposite insertion order. (Also, it's not really tested or verified, and may actually suck in your application. But that's always the risk with using code from some random dude on the intertubes.)

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+1 for a great answer, with one of those lol's thrown in for good measure at the end. –  Marty Pitt Dec 13 '11 at 10:21

Yes, there is a way. It is similar to the way ConcurrentHashMap made, if you know.

You should make your own data structure not from one list for all writing threads, but use several independent lists. Each of such lists should be guarded by it's own lock. .add() method should choose list for append current item based on Thread.currentThread.id (for example, just id % listsCount). This will gives you good concurrency properties for .add() -- at best, listsCount threads will be able to write without contention.

On makeSnapshot() you should just iterate over all lists, and for each list you grab it's lock and copy content.

This is just an idea -- there are many places to improve it.

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You can use a ReadWriteLock to allow multiple threads to perform add operations on the backing list in parallel, but only one thread to make the snapshot. While the snapshot is being prepared all other add and snapshot request are put on hold.

A ReadWriteLock maintains a pair of associated locks, one for read-only operations and one for writing. The read lock may be held simultaneously by multiple reader threads, so long as there are no writers. The write lock is exclusive.

class CopyOnReadList<T> {

    // free to use any concurrent data structure, ConcurrentLinkedQueue used as an example
    private final ConcurrentLinkedQueue<T> items = new ConcurrentLinkedQueue<T>();
    private final ReadWriteLock rwLock = new ReentrantReadWriteLock();
    private final Lock shared = rwLock.readLock();
    private final Lock exclusive = rwLock.writeLock(); 

    public void add(T item) {
        shared.lock(); // multiple threads can attain the read lock
        // try-finally is overkill if items.add() never throws exceptions
        try {
          // Add item while holding the lock.
          items.add(item);
        } finally {
          shared.unlock();
        }
    }

    public List<T> makeSnapshot() {
        List<T> copy = new ArrayList<T>(); // probably better idea to use a LinkedList or the ArrayList constructor with initial size
        exclusive.lock(); // only one thread can attain write lock, all read locks are also blocked
        // try-finally is overkill if for loop never throws exceptions
        try {
          // Make a copy while holding the lock.
          for (T t : items) {
            copy.add(t);
          }
        } finally {
          exclusive.unlock();
        }
        return copy;
    }

}

Edit:

The read-write lock is so named because it is based on the readers-writers problem not on how it is used. Using the read-write lock we can have multiple threads achieve read locks but only one thread achieve the write lock exclusively. In this case the problem is reversed - we want multiple threads to write (add) and only thread to read (make the snapshot). So, we want multiple threads to use the read lock even though they are actually mutating. Only thread is exclusively making the snapshot using the write lock even though snapshot only reads. Exclusive means that during making the snapshot no other add or snapshot requests can be serviced by other threads at the same time.

As @PeterLawrey pointed out, the Concurrent queue will serialize the writes aqlthough the locks will be used for as minimal a duration as possible. We are free to use any other concurrent data structure, e.g. ConcurrentDoublyLinkedList. The queue is used only as an example. The main idea is the use of read-write locks.

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Forgive my ignorance on the topic, but aren't you incorrectly using a readLock for items.add(), where you're actually performing a mutating operation (adding an item), which would therefore mean that you need a writeLock? –  Marty Pitt Dec 14 '11 at 1:50
    
Ah, the read-write lock is so named because it is based on the readers-writers problem not on how it is used. We can have multiple threads achieve read locks (multiple threads can add) but only one thread achieve the write lock exclusively (one thread does makeSnapshot, no other thread can add or makeSnaphsot at that time). –  shams Dec 14 '11 at 2:00
    
@MartyPitt I've updated the answer with the clarification :) –  shams Dec 14 '11 at 2:29
    
The simultaneous writes here is an illusion. The ConcurrentLinkedQueue can only have one thread adding an object at a time. It does this without locks, very fast but it isn't actually concurrent at the lowest level. Adding locks makes the solution slower than not using a lock. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 14 '11 at 8:03
    
Yes, but we can use any concurrent data structure including a concurrent list, the queue is here just as an example. The Michael and Scott queue is one of the fastest known concurrent queue impls, so realistically can't expect to get any faster with concurrent queues. –  shams Dec 14 '11 at 8:07

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