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Here's the code:

double angle( double *vec1 , double *vec2 ){
    return acos( ( *vec1 * *vec2 + *(vec1+1) * *(vec2+1) + *(vec1+2) * *(vec2+2) ) / ( sqrt( pow( *vec1 , 2 ) + pow( *(vec1+1) , 2 ) + pow( *(vec1+2) , 2 ) ) * sqrt( pow( *vec2 , 2 ) + pow( *(vec2+1) , 2 ) + pow( *(vec2+2) , 2 ) ) ) );
}

Vectors entered: <1,1,1> , <2,2,2>

It returns angle: -1.#IND00

Could you please tell me, what's wrong?

Here's the code "readable":

arcCos[ (x1*x2 + y1*y2 + z1*z2) / sqrt(x1^2 + y1^2 + z1^2) * sqrt(x2^2 + y2^2 + z2^2) ]
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is there a good reason for all of those pointer? why not wrap them in structs of something nice, or perhaps event using double[3] as arguments for the method, this is unreadable. –  Martin Kristiansen Dec 13 '11 at 10:06
    
@MartinKristiansen That's what I've been told to do as homework. That's the only reason. –  Michael Sazonov Dec 13 '11 at 10:08
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may i suggest that you try putting some brackets around the pointers so that it is obvious which '*' are multiplication symbols and which are denoting pointers. –  ChrisBD Dec 13 '11 at 10:09
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Suggest you break up this expression into several smaller expressions and printf the result of each one. This will help you discover which part of the expression is causign the problem. –  Simon Elliott Dec 13 '11 at 10:22
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You couldn't narrow this down at all? Test subexpressions? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Dec 13 '11 at 10:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your calculation should result in working out acos(1) with the numbers you have given which should come out as 0. However, 1 is at the very top of the allowed range for acos(x) to give a real result, anything higher would be complex (or in most cases throw some kind of error).

My guess would be that you are getting a floating point number slightly greater than one which is causing the problem. The reason is everybody's friend the floating point rounding errors.

When using your method of calculations you will be ending up with the dividend being the product of two square roots. In this case the square roots will of be sqrt(3) and sqrt(12). When multiplied these will give a whole number - 6. However, if both these numbers are rounded down slightly to make them fit in a floating point then when they are multiplied they might be slightly smaller than 6. You will then end up with 6 (on the top) dividided by something slightly smaller than 6 which would give you something slightly bigger than one.

One way to try to mitigate this risk is to change your calculation to:

sqrt((x1^2 + y1^2 + z1^2) * (x2^2 + y2^2 + z2^2))

This has the effect that the sqrt is only being done once on the product which is more likely to produce correct results.

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That is correct. It fixes the calculation. –  Michael Sazonov Dec 13 '11 at 11:13
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Awesome sauce. :) –  Chris Dec 13 '11 at 11:15

ok... here it goes .. the problem is due to math :-)

first I refactored your code :

double angle( double *vec1 , double *vec2 ){

  // sqlen = 6
  double sqlen =  vec1[0] * vec2[0] + vec1[1] * vec2[1] + vec1[2] * vec2[2]; 

  // sqpow1 = 3
  double sqpow1 = pow( vec1[0] , 2 ) + pow( vec1[1] , 2 ) + pow( vec1[2] , 2 );

  // sqpow2 = 12
  double sqpow2 = pow( vec2[0] , 2 ) + pow( vec2[1] , 2 ) + pow( vec2[2] , 2 );

  // 6/(sqrt(3)*sqrt(12)) = 1
  return acos( sqlen / ( sqrt(sqpow1) * sqrt(sqpow2) ) );
}

This should return '0', since acos(1) is clearly defined as 0. ;-)

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You know... I just forgot to check the value of acos(1) =) Well, great job! Thank you very much! =) –  Michael Sazonov Dec 13 '11 at 10:31
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Wrong. acos(1) is well defined and is 0. "For real elements of X in the domain [–1, 1], acos(X) is real and in the range [0, π]." (from that page you linked). –  Chris Dec 13 '11 at 10:52
    
@Chris your right, I was perhaps a bit to hastily jumping to conclussions. –  Martin Kristiansen Dec 13 '11 at 10:56
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@MartinKristiansen: Indeed. And I'm afraid as I'm a mathematician you incurred my wrath and got a -1 for it. I'm always happy to remove it though if you edit your answer in some way to make it not wrong. :) –  Chris Dec 13 '11 at 11:04
    
@Chris done! ;-) Perhaps I should have stuck to math... instead of living up to all the stereotyoes of a computer scientist... –  Martin Kristiansen Dec 13 '11 at 12:07

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