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While working with Threads in C, I'm facing the warning

"warning: cast to pointer from integer of different size"

The code is as follows

#include<stdio.h>
#include<sys/types.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<pthread.h>
void *print(void *id)
{
 int a=10;
 printf("My thread id is %ld\n",pthread_self());
 printf("Thread %d is executing\n",id);
 return (void *) 42;
}

int main()
{
 pthread_t th[5];
 int t;
 int i;
 int status;
 void *ret;
 for(i=0;i<5;i++)
 {
   status=pthread_create(&th[i],NULL,print,(void *)i); //Getting warning at this line
   if(status)
   {
    printf("Error creating threads\n");
    exit(0);
   }
   pthread_join(th[i],&ret);
   printf("--->%d\n",(int *)ret);
 }
 pthread_exit(NULL);
}

Can anybody explain how to pass an integer to a function which receives (void * ) as a parameter?

share|improve this question
    
Check sizeof(int) and sizeof(void*) on your platform. I suspect they're different, which is why you're seeing the warning. –  Sean Dec 13 '11 at 10:16
    
@Dinesh: could you please 1) show us those sizeofs, I've never seen such a platform, loads of pthread manuals use the code you just showed. 2) accept a different answer, the one you've chosen is just wrong.. –  Karoly Horvath Dec 13 '11 at 12:44
    
Please unaccept the answer you have chosen as it is wrong (as the comments below it say) and will lead to bugs. –  interjay Oct 22 '13 at 20:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 23 down vote accepted

This is a fine way to pass integers to new pthreads, if that is what you need. You just need to suppress the warning, and this will do it:

#include <stdint.h>

void *threadfunc(void *param)
{
    int id = (intptr_t) param;
    ...
}

int i, r;
r = pthread_create(&thread, NULL, threadfunc, (void *) (intptr_t) i);

Discussion

This may offend your sensibilities, but it's very short and has no race conditions (as you'd have if you used &i). No sense in writing a few dozen lines of extra code just to get a bunch of numbered threads.

Data races

Here is a bad version with a data race:

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#define N 10

void *thread_func(void *arg)
{
    int *ptr = arg;
    // Has *ptr changed by the time we get here?  Maybe!
    printf("Arg = %d\n", *ptr);
    return NULL;
}

int main()
{
    int i;
    pthread_t threads[N];
    for (i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        // NO NO NO NO this is bad!
        pthread_create(&threads[i], NULL, thread_func, &i);
    }
    for (i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        pthread_join(threads[i], NULL);
    }
    return 0;
}

Now, what happens when I run it with the thread sanitizer?

(Also, check out how it prints "5" twice...)

==================
WARNING: ThreadSanitizer: data race (pid=20494)
  Read of size 4 at 0x7ffc95a834ec by thread T1:
    #0 thread_func /home/depp/test.c:9 (a.out+0x000000000a8c)
    #1 <null> <null> (libtsan.so.0+0x000000023519)

  Previous write of size 4 at 0x7ffc95a834ec by main thread:
    #0 main /home/depp/test.c:17 (a.out+0x000000000b3a)

  Location is stack of main thread.

  Thread T1 (tid=20496, running) created by main thread at:
    #0 pthread_create <null> (libtsan.so.0+0x0000000273d4)
    #1 main /home/depp/test.c:18 (a.out+0x000000000b1c)

SUMMARY: ThreadSanitizer: data race /home/depp/test.c:9 thread_func
==================
Arg = 1
Arg = 2
Arg = 3
Arg = 4
Arg = 5
Arg = 6
Arg = 7
Arg = 8
Arg = 9
Arg = 5
ThreadSanitizer: reported 1 warnings
share|improve this answer
    
+1 absolutely true, but if you take you time to write struct {}, you can save a lot of troubles in the future when you want to receive/send more data then just an int –  jackdoe Dec 13 '11 at 10:41
6  
@jackdoe: It's a waste of human life to write code that "you may need in the future". –  Dietrich Epp Dec 13 '11 at 10:44
1  
@DietrichEpp can you explain what is race condition with using (void *)&i in pthread_create(), i am using it and compiler doesn't shows warning,i am thinking but could not figure it out,i am also casting the value passed to the thread like this int *b=(int*)a kindly see this –  Xax Apr 30 at 15:57
1  
@Xax: First of all, (void *) is redundant, just use &i. Also, compilers don't warn you about race conditions, you have to figure those out for yourself (or use special tools). The race condition occurs because you have to wait until each thread is done reading i before you can change i or let it leave scope. Here is an example of what can go wrong: gist.github.com/depp/241d6f839b799042c409 –  Dietrich Epp Apr 30 at 20:56
    
@Xax: Here's a fixed version, without the race condition: gist.github.com/depp/3f04508a88a114734195 –  Dietrich Epp Apr 30 at 21:00

you can do something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>
struct th {
    pthread_t thread;
    int id;
    int ret;
};

void *print(void *id) {
    int a=10;
    struct th *self = (struct th *) id;
    printf("My thread id is %ld\n",pthread_self());
    printf("Thread %d is executing\n",self->id);
    self->ret = random();
    return;
}

int main(void) {
    struct th th[5];
    int t;
    int i;
    int status;
    void *ret;
    for(i=0;i<5;i++) {
        th[i].id = i;
        status=pthread_create(&th[i].thread,NULL,print,&th[i]); //Getting warning at this line
        if(status) {
            printf("Error creating threads\n");
            exit(0);
        }
    }
    for (i=0;i<5;i++) {
        pthread_join(th[i].thread,&ret);
        printf("%d--->%d\n",th[i].id,th[i].ret);

    }
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

will output:

My thread id is 4496162816
My thread id is 4497870848
My thread id is 4498944000
My thread id is 4498407424
Thread 0 is executing
Thread 1 is executing
My thread id is 4499480576
Thread 3 is executing
Thread 2 is executing
0--->1804289383
Thread 4 is executing
1--->846930886
2--->1714636915
3--->1681692777
4--->1957747793

passing a unique pointer to each thread wont race, and you can get/save any kind of information in the th struct

share|improve this answer

That code always worked for me, you are using some strange platform..

As @Sean mentioned in the comments the size for int and void * differ.. Compile with short i;.

share|improve this answer
    
It's not a strange platform, GCC will give these warnings. –  Dietrich Epp Dec 13 '11 at 10:33
    
@Dietrich Epp: doesn't complain here with -Wall. –  Karoly Horvath Dec 13 '11 at 12:24
    
Use -Wall -Wextra. –  Dietrich Epp Dec 13 '11 at 13:57
    
@Dietrich Epp: no warnings. It worked on any platform I used previously and this is what all the pthread tutorials show you. I'm telling you that warning is not normal (note: I know the C standard doesn't guarantee that it will fit). What kind of platform do you use? –  Karoly Horvath Dec 13 '11 at 15:42
1  
If int and void* differ in size, what makes you think short i; will help? The most likely scenario is 32-bit int and 64-bit void*. The intent, I think, is that the void* should point to an object of some arbitrary type. You can malloc an int object and pass its address as the void* argument, then convert and dereference it inside the function; then you don't need to care about relative sizes of integers and pointers. –  Keith Thompson Oct 22 '13 at 21:11

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