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I created the following awk command in order to print only the line that match the host and the ETH parameters

my problem is that I don’t know which eth1-8 is the real argument

How to print the line from the file by awk if ETH could be eth0 or eth1 or eth2 ....etc until eth8

 HOSTNAME=linux1
 LAN=eth0|eth1|eth2|eth3|eth4|eth5|eth6|eth7|eth8

 awk -v host=$HOSTNAME -v ETH=$LAN  '$2 == host && $3 == ETH'  file



 more file


192.17.200.10  linux1 eth0
192.17.200.10  linux1 eth1
192.17.200.11  linux2 eth2
192.17.200.12  linux3 eth3
192.17.200.13  linux4 eth4
192.17.200.14  linux5 eth5
192.17.200.15  linux6 eth6
192.17.200.16  linux7 eth7
192.17.200.17  linux8 eth8
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use a regular expression to specify the possible matches, e.g.:

awk '$2 == "linux1" && $3 ~ /^eth[0-8]$/'

In terms of the shell variable, you'll want something like:

LAN='^eth[0-8]$'
awk -v host=$HOSTNAME -v ETH=$LAN '$2 == host && $3 ~ ETH' file
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using awk:

hostname=linux1
lan=eth

 awk -v host="$hostname" -v lan="$lan" '$2==host && ($3~lan)' yourFile

actually for your problem, grep works too:

 grep -P 'linux1\s.*?eth\d' yourFile

if you want to use the variables in grep:

grep -P  "${hostname}\s.*${lan}\d" yourFile
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about the grep option – grep must matched exactly the string for example its match linux1 and linux11 –  david Dec 13 '11 at 11:20
    
@david you are right. just add a space(\s) between ${hostname} and ".". see the update in answer. –  Kent Dec 13 '11 at 12:31
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