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In Play! if you call this:

void method()
{
User u = User();
u.name = "bob";
u.save();
while(true){/* endless loop */}
}

Nothing will actually be saved into the db (The Play! class needs to get the hand back to flush the saves.)

How do I have to proceed in order to either force a flush or to make it automatically flush at save ?

share|improve this question
    
Could you tell us your usecase? Because most of the time this is a bad idea. – Somatik Dec 14 '11 at 10:13
    
Actually I never call while(true){}; but as I did a very large import within the method, that last one gave back the hand very lately (which resulted in no db changes all that time long). Writing the question that way was much shorter and the expected answer was the same. – Flavien Volken Dec 14 '11 at 14:41
    
Sounds like you better trigger some job and use ajax to give feedback to the user. – Somatik Dec 14 '11 at 18:00
    
Exactly, actually it is in a job already. I then run importer.now(); to startup the process. The import takes few hours… I only need to do this once a month and to look at the logs if everything was fine or not. – Flavien Volken Dec 14 '11 at 18:33
up vote 11 down vote accepted

The reason why your changes are not visible in the database, is that the transaction is not yet commited and so other transactions can't see your changes (at least in a good database like PostgreSQL, Oracle, MSSQL, DB2). To make your changes seen, you'll have to commit your transaction before it enters the infinite loop, like this:

void method()
{
    User u = User();
    u.name = "bob";
    u.save();
    JPA.em().flush();
    JPA.em().getTransaction().commit();

    while(true){/* endless loop */}

}

If you want to access your database inside the infinite loop or after it (if you have a break condition), you'll have to begin a new transaction or you'll get exceptions from hibernate. Do this like this

void method()
{
    User u = User();
    u.name = "bob";
    u.save();
    JPA.em().flush();
    JPA.em().getTransaction().commit();

    while(true){
      // do some stuff

      /* TRANSACTIONAL BLOCK BEGINS */
      JPA.em().getTransaction().begin();
      try{
          // do some stuff
          // fetching, updating, deleting, whatever

          JPA.em().getTransaction().commit();
      }
      catch (Exception e)
      {
          // if an error occurs, rollback the transaction
          JPA.em().getTransaction().rollback();
      }
      /* TRANSACTIONAL BLOCK ENDS */
      // do some other stuff
    }
   // copy the TRANSACTIONAL BLOCK from above, if you want to do stuff after the "infinite loop" as well.
}

It's important that you either commit or rollback the transaction in the loop, if you start it there, as else you'll run into problems with too many open transactions soon.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, except for the infinite loop. Also, I believe that the 2 answers there were already clear enough. I don't thing it was needed for you to re-summarize them (badly) in a different answer – Shivan Dragon Dec 15 '11 at 8:31
    
Thanks for your comment - I've enhanced the answer. – Dominik Dorn Dec 15 '11 at 11:00

As already said by Andrei Bodnarescu, you can use JPA.em().flush() or User.em().flush() to flush persistence context explicitly.

Note, however, that doing so won't make the saved entity immediately available to other transactions, since the current transaction should be committed first. You can commit the current transaction as JPA.em().getTransaction().commit().

share|improve this answer

Try

User.em().flush();

If I'm not mistaken, the default Play! model holds a refference to the EntityManager which can be accessed like that.

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