Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I get java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException, when I call replaceAll() with replacement text containing $1:

This is from a more complex code, but I simplified it as follows:

http://ideone.com/QCof3

class Test {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        String test = "@Key";
        String replacement = "$1";
        test = test.replaceAll("@Key", replacement);
        System.out.println(test);
    }
}


Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException: No group 1
    at java.util.regex.Matcher.group(Matcher.java:470)
    at java.util.regex.Matcher.appendReplacement(Matcher.java:737)
    at java.util.regex.Matcher.replaceAll(Matcher.java:813)
    at java.lang.String.replaceAll(String.java:2189)
    at Test.main(Main.java:5)

Are there any workarounds for this issue? I do not want to use a 3rd party library.

share|improve this question
3  
With replaceAll that would be expected behaviour. –  Johan Sjöberg Dec 13 '11 at 12:15
1  
You're asking about a NullPointerException yet the stack trace is for an IndexOutOfBoundsException. –  NPE Dec 13 '11 at 12:17
    
@JohanSjöberg Why is it expected? I don't see any restrictions on replacement string in method documentation. –  Caner Dec 13 '11 at 12:19
    
Have suggested a mod amend the post title, since this isn't a bug in the API either. –  mcfinnigan Dec 13 '11 at 12:20
    
@aix Sorry, I fixed that. –  Caner Dec 13 '11 at 12:20

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

try with the replace() only

test = test.replace("@Key", replacement);
share|improve this answer
    
I need to replace all occurences. –  Caner Dec 13 '11 at 12:16
3  
@LAS_VEGAS: replace() actually replaces all occurences as well. The only difference is that replaceAll() takes regexps. –  axtavt Dec 13 '11 at 12:19
    
yes you are right @axtavt –  Pratik Dec 13 '11 at 12:21
    
yes, it works. Thanks! –  Caner Dec 13 '11 at 12:25

String replacement = "\\$1";

should resolve it. $ is a regex control character, so just like any other control character it must be escaped. Java being java, the escape has to be a double backslash.

share|improve this answer
    
how can I programmatically escape $? –  Caner Dec 13 '11 at 12:15
    
append a backslash in front of it whenever you detect it in an input stream. –  mcfinnigan Dec 13 '11 at 12:17
    
replacement = replacement.replaceAll("$", "\\$"); When I do that I get replacement = "\\$1$" –  Caner Dec 13 '11 at 12:23
    
because it is the FIRST parameter that must be a regular expression. '$' by itself matches either a group if it has a numeral, or the end of the current line if it does not. –  mcfinnigan Dec 13 '11 at 12:27
    String test = "@Key";
    String replacement = "\\$1";
    test = test.replaceAll("@Key", replacement);
    System.out.println(test);

share|improve this answer
    
how can I programmatically escape $? –  Caner Dec 13 '11 at 12:16
    
if "$1".equals(replacement){/*do stuff*/} , may be contains() –  Jigar Joshi Dec 13 '11 at 12:17
    
I need to be able to replace any string such as "abcd$xabcd". How do I do that programatically? replacement = replacement.replaceAll("$", "\\$"); When I do that I get replacement = "\\$1$" –  Caner Dec 13 '11 at 12:24
    
May be you can use some reg-ex pattern to do this –  Jigar Joshi Dec 13 '11 at 12:27

Check your regular expression. You want to catch the first group that was selected in your regular expression. But your regular expression is only $1. This means that it takes the first group. But there is no such group, so there is the exception.

 Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException: No group 1

Try using this command with this regular expression.

Class Test {  
   public static void main(String args[]) {  
      String test = "@Key";  
      String replacement = "!!$1";  
      test = test.replaceAll("(@Key)", replacement);  
      System.out.println(test);  
   }  
}

The result is test = !!@Key. Because the first group is @Key and replacement by !!@Key.

Please check there links for rugular expressions. Lesson REGEX
And: Search and replace with regular expressions

Hope this help

share|improve this answer

If you really need the regex in String.replaceAll() instead of just the String.replace(), which really does replace all strings but just does not use regex, you can use Matcher.quoteReplacement()

String stringwithgroup = "Give me all your $$$$";
String result = proposal.replaceAll("Marry me",Matcher.quoteReplacement(stringwithgroup));
share|improve this answer

Solution

This is what you need to do:

String test = "@Key";
String replacement = "\\$1";
test = test.replaceAll("@Key", replacement);
System.out.println(test);

Use of $#

'$#', '#' being a number in the second argument of replaceAll means it will get the 1st group of matches. So to use it correctly, here's an example:

String test = "World Hello!!!";
String replacement = "$2 $1";
test = test.replaceAll("(World) (Hello)", replacement);
System.out.println(test);

You create groups with the brackets, and the code take the two groups and swap them around.

Use of $

'$' in regular expression means the end of the line. So by using '$' as the first argument in replaceAll, will append to the end of the string, ie:

String test = "World Hello!!!";     
test = test.replaceAll("$", " ~ a java dev");
System.out.println(test);
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.