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Consider the following code-snippet

typedef int type;
int main()
{
   type *type; // why is it allowed?
   type *k ;// which type?
}

I get an error 'k' is not declared in this scope. The compiler parses type *k as multiplication between type* and k. Isn't this grammar very confusing?

Why is type *type allowed by the C++ Standard? Because the grammar says so? Why?

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3  
+1. I think it is a good question. –  Nawaz Dec 13 '11 at 12:28
    
It is part of C++ for compatibility with C. Why it was allowed in C is probably what you really want to know. –  IronMensan Dec 13 '11 at 12:30
    
@IronMensan : The grammar is after all derived. Also adding C tag. –  Prasoon Saurav Dec 13 '11 at 12:30
2  
I don't recall the nitty-gritty, but the "namespace" for variables and the "namespace" for typedefs are distinct and separate. Confusing as hell, if you ask me. –  Hot Licks Dec 13 '11 at 12:34
1  
@HotLicks: That is wrong. There are two identifier spaces, one for user defined types (classes and enum) and one for everything else that includes both variables and typedef'ed names. One of main uses of typedef in C is actually to create an alias in the global identifier space that refers to an identifier in the user defined type space (i.e. typedef struct X {} X; has as sole purpose to define X in the global identifier space to refer to struct X) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 13 '11 at 12:56

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The question is actually about when exactly a variable name is defined as an identifier, and the language determines that it is right after the point in code where the variable is declared:

typedef int type;
int main() {
   type t;   // type refers to ::type
   int       // type still refers to ::type
   type;     // variable declared, this shadows ::type
   type + 1; // type is a variable of type int.
}

There are similar rules in other contexts, and it is just a matter of deciding when identifiers are declared. There are other similar situations, for example in the initialization list of a class:

struct test {
   int x;          // declare member
   test( int x )   // declare parameter (shadows member)
   : x(            // refers to member (parameter is not legal here)
        x )        // refers to parameter
   {};
};

Or in the scope of the identifiers in the definition of member functions:

struct test {
   typedef int type;
   type f( type );
};
test::type         // qualification required, the scope of the return type is
                   // at namespace level
test::f(
         type t )  // but the scope of arguments is the class, no qualification
                   // required.
{}

As of the rationale for the decision, I cannot tell you but it is consistent and simple.

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Is int type (in main()) allowed after this : typedef int type (at the global namespace)? –  Nawaz Dec 13 '11 at 12:59
    
@Nawaz: as long as they are in a different scope there is no problem. type outside of main will refer to the typedef, type in main after the variable declaration will shadow the the typedef. It would be utterly confusing if type type; was to be allowed but int type; wasn't :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 13 '11 at 13:03
    
You commented on @thiton's answer, saying : "The variable and the typedef'ed name share the same identifier space, the reason it is allowed is because they have different scopes". What is the exact difference between identifier space and scope? Does the Standard talk about it? –  Nawaz Dec 13 '11 at 13:06
    
@Nawaz: I don't think the standard uses identifier space but the rules for name collisions can be colloquially explained that way. Thiton had used "namespaces for variable/type", which can be confusing as namespace has a different meaning in the language. Given a scope you can have identifiers that refer to user defined types and other user defined things (variables, functions, typedef'ed names...). Elements from the first and second group (identifier space) can share the name as long as there is a single element in each group with the same name. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 13 '11 at 16:36
    
... struct T {} T; declares in a single scope a user defined type T and a variable T of that type --there is no clash of identifiers. But struct T {}; enum T { YES }; and int T; void T(); are both errors as they try to defined a single identifier T to mean different things in each one of the sets of names (first case the user defined types, in the second case the general identifier space). Typedef'ed names appear in the second group, so typedef struct a {} b; void a(); is correct but typedef struct a {} b; void b(); is an error (b in the general identifier space is redefined) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 13 '11 at 16:39

It is confusing, but this is the only way to get access to type variable. If you want to use type type you can do:

typedef int type;
int main() {
    type *type;
    ::type *k ;
    return 0;
} 

Most of those grammar monstrosities come from backward compatibility with C.

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I think it is allowed probably because it provides flexibility for programmers when choosing name for the variables they declare. In C#, you could declare property of same name as the type:

//C# code
class Manager
{
   public Name Name {get;set;}
};

When I code in C#, I find this feature very useful. Because I've more options for names to choose from. Otherwise, if I've a type called Name, then I wouldn't be able to create a property of the same name, I would be forced to choose a different name, say Name_, _Name, name, NAME etc - all of which don't appeal to me.


As for your code, since in the scope (after declaration of object type), type is already a variable, the type `type cannot be referred to directly. But I think this should compile fine and according to the Standard:

typedef int type;
int main()
{
   type *type; // why is it allowed?
   ::type *k ;// which type?
}

Demo : http://ideone.com/chOov

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2  
Yes but my question was not 'how to make it work?'. –  Prasoon Saurav Dec 13 '11 at 12:34
    
@PrasoonSaurav: I know that. But I also tried to answer your question. –  Nawaz Dec 13 '11 at 12:35
1  
I don't think it adds flexibility but only confusion. :P I knew :: would make that work but that was not my question after all. –  Prasoon Saurav Dec 13 '11 at 12:36
    
@PrasoonSaurav: I edited my post, justifying why it is flexible. It is confusing, I agree, but it is flexible too. Confusing and flexibility are not mutually exclusive. –  Nawaz Dec 13 '11 at 12:41
1  
@PrasoonSaurav: Is it the language or your choice of names what adds confusion? I have never been startled by this: before the variable is declared, the identifier cannot refer to it, so it has to refer to whatever that identifier referred to in the previous line. After it is declared, in this scope, it refers to the variable. The rule is quite simple to understand and not really confusing... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 13 '11 at 12:53

The rationale of keeping namespaces (not in the C++ sense, but in variable/type namespace) separate is fairly obvious: When you don't pollute the variable namespace with type names, less code breaks on typedef.

Suppose there was pre-existing code with a variable named "employee". If variables and typedefs lived in the same namespace, a "typedef struct {} employee;" would break the existing code, requiring a change of the variable name (which was more of an issue in pre-IDE days). However, if they do not share a namespace, there is no problem and people have one less issue to worry about when choosing type names in large code bases.

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1  
This is unrelated to the question. The variable and the typedef'ed name share the same identifier space, the reason it is allowed is because they have different scopes. Consider the following example: typedef int type; int type; which is a compiler error (something along the lines of type already defined to be something else). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 13 '11 at 12:51
type *type; // why is it allowed?

C++11 3.3.2/1 says:

The point of declaration for a name is immediately after its complete declarator (Clause 8) and before its initializer (if any)

So the variable name type is not introduced until after the use of the type name type; the type name is the only available meaning of type during the declarator.

type *k ;// which type?

The local variable name hides the global type name, so that is chosen here. This is described in C++11 3.3.10/1:

A name can be hidden by an explicit declaration of that same name in a nested declarative region or derived class.

The fully qualified type name, ::type, is of course still available.

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1  
+1 for clear answer(and because this is new for me). –  kist Dec 13 '11 at 12:56
1  
@Mike : My question actually was 'what's the rationale behind this rule?' –  Prasoon Saurav Dec 13 '11 at 13:45
2  
@PrasoonSaurav: The rationale for a name's scope to begin after its declaration, rather than at some point before it? I can only speculate about what the language designers were thinking, but that seems more sensible to me than any other option, even if it does allow slightly wonky code like type *type;. –  Mike Seymour Dec 13 '11 at 14:07
1  
@PrasoonSaurav: Or the rationale for allowing declarations to hide names already declared in outer regions? I'd certainly find it rather restrictive if I couldn't use a name anywhere because someone happened to have declared it in the global namespace. –  Mike Seymour Dec 13 '11 at 14:10

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