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I've tried to read a big xml file (something like 500MB). First of all, I used xjc with the XSD file of my XML. All classes were generated as expected. Trying to read the file I've got this error: javax.xml.bind.UnmarshalException: unexpected element.

Here is my code:

(...)

JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance("br.com.mypackage");
Unmarshaller unmarshaller = context.createUnmarshaller();
File f = new File("src/files/MyHuge.CNX");
XMLInputFactory inputFactory = XMLInputFactory.newInstance();
InputStream in = new FileInputStream(f);
XMLEventReader eventReader = inputFactory.createXMLEventReader(in);
Person p = null;
int count = 0;
while (eventReader.hasNext()) {
   XMLEvent event = eventReader.nextEvent();
   if (event.isStartElement()) {
      StartElement startElement = event.asStartElement();
      if (startElement.getName().getLocalPart() == ("person")) {
         p = (Person) unmarshaller.unmarshal(eventReader);
      }
   }
}

The problem is in the unmarshal operation.

Caused by: javax.xml.bind.UnmarshalException: unexpected element (uri:"", local:"identification"). Expected elements are <{}messageAll>

I used this link as example to make my own code: JAXB - unmarshal OutOfMemory: Java Heap Space

Someone has a clue to do it? All that I want now is to read a huge XML file without unmarshal the external object of XML (java heap space problem) and without reading tag by tag getting the respective value, a slow and monkey code (not the monkeys of Rise of the Planet of the Apes). :P

Many thanks.

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Can u share the xml and the Classes and their jaxb mappings used here? Is there a class with annotation @XmlRootElement(namespace="", name = "identification") in the package br.com.mypackage –  Arun P Johny Dec 13 '11 at 13:42
    
Arun, on the Person class, there is this annotation: @XmlAccessorType(XmlAccessType.FIELD) @XmlType(name = "", propOrder = {"identification","address","whatever"}) So, I thought that the XJC would do all that small things related with annotations. Maybe is it a problem on the XSD file? –  T Soares Dec 13 '11 at 18:43
    
Can you try to print the contents of the event reader before passing it to the unmarshaller? It looks like instead of passing the person element at the root you are passing an identification element. And the Person class should have @XmlType(name = "person", propOrder = {"identification","address","whatever"}). Can you also give the type of identification object. –  Arun P Johny Dec 14 '11 at 3:16
    
I made a test. I tried to "unmarshal" the Identification object. It doens't work. It launchs the same exception: Caused by: javax.xml.bind.UnmarshalException: unexpected element (uri:"", local:"identification"). Expected elements are <(none)> I edited the XML file removing persons. I left just 5 persons. With this small file, I made successfully the unmarshal operation using the most external object generated by the XJC. All 5 persons were created as expected. With this test, I don't think that's a annotations problem. (how can I send you the xsd file?) –  T Soares Dec 14 '11 at 19:01
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2 Answers

I'm guessing that the problem is you've already consumed the <person> from the event stream so JAXB doesn't know what it is doing; it needs that element to be there so it can build the object. Thus, I suspect you need to peek the stream to decide whether to consume (and discard) or to unmarshal:

while (eventReader.hasNext()) {
   XMLEvent event = eventReader.peek();
   if (event.isStartElement()) {
      StartElement startElement = event.asStartElement();
      if (startElement.getName().getLocalPart() == ("person")) {
         p = (Person) unmarshaller.unmarshal(eventReader);
         continue; // Assume you've done something with p; go round loop again
      }
   }
   eventReader.nextElement(); // Discard...
}
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I tried it. In fact I posted a digest of my code. I'm getting the next element for each iteration of while loop. Anyway I tested with peek method (as you did) but It doesn't work. I would like to avoid the code using "switch way" to get each field and its value. Could you send me a link to a good tutorial? Maybe I don't understanding the purpose of unmarshal function and if attends my need. –  T Soares Dec 13 '11 at 18:57
    
Hello all, problem solved. Here is the link to the solution: pastebin.com/JQ6uN9Te if (start.getName().getLocalPart() == "person")) { JAXBElement<Person> jax_benef = unmarshaller.unmarshal(eventReader, Person.class); p = jax_benef.getValue(); } I don't know why the old method wasn't working (unmarshall using the Person object instead of JAXBElement). Do you have some clue about it wasn't working? –  T Soares Dec 14 '11 at 19:58
    
@TSoares: I don't know, but I guess it must have something to do with the amount of context available to JAXB to allow it to make a decision about what to do. (On the plus side, you no longer need an explicit cast since you know what you're getting.) –  Donal Fellows Dec 15 '11 at 10:45
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I solved the problem with this code bellow:

public List<Person> testeUnmarshal() {
  List<Person> people = new ArrayList<Person>();
  Person p = null;
  try {
    JAXBContext context = JAXBContext.newInstance(Person.class);
    Unmarshaller unmarshaller = context.createUnmarshaller();
    File f = new File(FILE_PATH);
    XMLInputFactory inputFactory = XMLInputFactory.newInstance();
    XMLEventReader eventReader = inputFactory.createXMLEventReader(new FileInputStream(f));
    while (eventReader.hasNext()) {
      XMLEvent event = eventReader.peek();
      if (event.isStartElement()) {
        StartElement start = event.asStartElement();
    if (start.getName().getLocalPart() == "person")) {
          JAXBElement<Person> jax_b = unmarshaller.unmarshal(eventReader, Person.class);
      p = jax_b.getValue();
    }
      }
      eventReader.next();
    }
  } catch (Exception e) {
  }
  return persons;
}

I can control the amount of objects in memory using counts inside a loop (for 1000 Persons commit in database).

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