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I am new to python object oriented and i am rewriting my existing application as an object oriented version , because now developers are increases and my code become un-maintainable.

Normally i use multiprocessing ques but i found from this example http://www.doughellmann.com/PyMOTW/multiprocessing/basics.html that i can subclass multiprocessing.Process so i think its a good idea and writing a class to test like this:

code:

from multiprocessing import Process
class Processor(Process):
    def return_name(self):
        return "Process %s" % self.name
    def run(self):
        return self.return_name()

processes = []


if __name__ == "__main__":

        for i in range(0,5):
                p=Processor()
                processes.append(p)
                p.start()
        for p in processes:
                p.join()

However i cannot get back the values , how can i use queues in this way?

EDIT: I want to get the return value and thinking where to put Queues().

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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Process needs a Queue() to receive the results... An example of how to do this follows...

from multiprocessing import Process, Queue
class Processor(Process):

    def __init__(self, queue, idx):
        super(Processor, self).__init__()
        self.queue = queue
        self.idx = idx

    def return_name(self):
        ## NOTE: self.name is an attribute of multiprocessing.Process
        return "Process idx=%s is called '%s'" % (self.idx, self.name)

    def run(self):
        self.queue.put(self.return_name())

## Create a list to hold running Processor objects
processes = list()

if __name__ == "__main__":

    q = Queue()
    for i in range(0,5):
        p=Processor(queue=q, idx=i)
        processes.append(p)
        p.start()
    for proc in processes:
        proc.join()
        ## NOTE: You cannot depend on the results to queue / dequeue in the
        ## same order
        print "RESULT: %s" % q.get()

On my machine, this results in...

$ python test.py
RESULT: Process idx=0 is called 'Processor-1'
RESULT: Process idx=4 is called 'Processor-5'
RESULT: Process idx=3 is called 'Processor-4'
RESULT: Process idx=1 is called 'Processor-2'
RESULT: Process idx=2 is called 'Processor-3'
$
share|improve this answer
    
So , in one of the method have to accept Queue object as parameter right? –  V3ss0n Dec 13 '11 at 13:19
    
Done! i created an init method accepting queues. this in-turn extends multiprocessing.Process to accept Queues directly :) –  V3ss0n Dec 13 '11 at 13:56
    
Thanks for the correction. This code return self.queue.put(self.return_name()) returns a queue? –  V3ss0n Dec 13 '11 at 14:24
1  
the return value from the Processor() call itself is irrelevant; you are passing the return value through the Queue() instance that you started the Processor() with –  Mike Pennington Dec 13 '11 at 14:26

The return value of Process.run doesn't go anywhere. You need to send them back to the parent process, e.g. using a multiprocessing.Queue (docs here).

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Thanks a lot everyone.

Now heres how i got it done :)

In this example i use multiple queus as i do not want to communicate between each ohter but only with parent process.

from multiprocessing import Process,Queue
class Processor(Process):
    def __init__(self,queue):
        Process.__init__(self)
        self.que=queue
    def get_name(self):
        return "Process %s" % self.name
    def run(self):
        self.que.put(self.get_name())



if __name__ == "__main__":

        processes = []
        for i in range(0,5):
                p=Processor(Queue())
                processes.append(p)
                p.start()
        for p in processes:
                p.join()
                print p.que.get()
share|improve this answer
    
Please review my code and let me know what i can improve to be more pythonic / and better practice. –  V3ss0n Dec 13 '11 at 13:48
    
you should use super()... see my post... –  Mike Pennington Dec 13 '11 at 13:55
    
THanks i will check. But i've read supers are dangerous especially multiple inheritance? is that true? –  V3ss0n Dec 13 '11 at 14:17
    
you need to be very careful when using super() with multiple inheritance. That said, I don't see multiple inheritance in the question you asked –  Mike Pennington Dec 13 '11 at 14:32
1  
You don't actually need a queue for each process. Multiple processes can put things into one queue without a problem. This is common when you have worker processes doing some computation, and putting output in a common result queue. –  Thomas K Dec 13 '11 at 17:31

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