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I am trying to figure out how to design a database for an application I am developing. I just want to use it as a datastore for saving and accessing configuration parameters. I've never designed a database before.

My application configures settings for a system with many components. Some of the components are unique, and some have subcomponents. Each component has a number of parameters, some of which are single values and others which contain a variable number of records.

I could represent the system like this:

<System>
    <A P1="" P2="">
        <E P3="" P4="" P5="" P6="" />
        <F P7="" P8="" P9="" P10="" />
        <G>
            <H>123</H>
            <H>123</H>
            <H>123</H>
            <H>123</H>
            <H>123</H>
        </G>
    </A>
    <B P1="" P2="">
        <E P3="" P4="" P5="" P6="" />
        <F P7="" P8="" P9="" P10="" />
        <G>
            <H>123</H>
            <H>123</H>
            <H>123</H>
        </G>
    </B>
    <C P1="" P2="">
        <E P11="" P12="" P13="" P14="" />
        <I P15="" P16="" P17="" P18="" P19="" />
    </C>
    <D>
        <E P11="" P12="" P13="" P14="" />
        <I P15="" P16="" P17="" P18="" P19="" />
    </D>
</System>

I'm not sure how this would be represented in tables and columns. What approach should I use to convert this into a relational database model?

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1 Answer 1

The tag attributes will convert into table columns. Every sub component is linked by a foreign key. That could be done with one table.

// from scratch

create table system (
    id char(1)
    parent char(1)
    p1 char(1)
    p2 char(1)
    p3 char(1)
    p4 char(1)
    p5 char(1)
);

insert into table system values("A",null,"","",null,null,null);
insert into table system values("E","A","","","","",null);
insert into table system values("F","A","","","","",null);
insert into table system values("G","A",null,null,null,null,null);
insert into table system values("H","G","123",null,null,null,null);
insert into table system values("H","G","123",null,null,null,null);
insert into table system values("H","G","123",null,null,null,null);
insert into table system values("H","G","123",null,null,null,null);
insert into table system values("H","G","123",null,null,null,null);
...
share|improve this answer
    
You've simplified a bit, right? I have multiple instances of E and F with different values, so those would be additional rows with different parents? Also the parameters on A are not the same as the parameters on E and F, so with this design my table would have hundreds or thousands of columns. –  M. Dudley Dec 13 '11 at 15:24
    
I updated the parameter names to show that they're unique. –  M. Dudley Dec 13 '11 at 15:26
    
Ok, you didn't mentioned that before. Then, what is the problem with the XML notation. When all datasets might be diferent, then maybe a relational model is not the best. –  PeterMmm Dec 13 '11 at 15:37
    
Would you be able to suggest an alternative to the relational model? I am completely new to this. –  M. Dudley Dec 13 '11 at 16:33
1  
My application configures settings for a system with many components. How many 100, 1000, 1000000000 ? What is your progr. language ? –  PeterMmm Dec 13 '11 at 16:41

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