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I'd compare more than one only field of a object using the compareTo method. Is it possible?

for istance:

public int compareTo(Object o) {
    return field.compareTo(o.field);
}

I create this method to sort a collection. Obviously my object has to implement Comparable interface.

I'm guessing if is possible to compare not only one field in the same method compareTo.

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possible duplicate of Best way to compare objects by multiple fields? –  blank Dec 13 '11 at 15:13
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7 Answers

Yes, it's possible, for example like so:

public int compareTo(MyClass o){
  int ret = field1.compareTo(o.field1);
  if (ret != 0) return ret;
  ret = field2.compareTo(o.field2);
  if (ret != 0) return ret;
  ...
  return fieldN.compareTo(o.fieldN);
}
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With generics, it wouldn't be Object unless for some very odd reason (like backward compatibility) you have implemented Comparable<Object>. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 13 '11 at 15:16
    
Reusing that variables is a bit nasty. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 13 '11 at 15:21
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Yes, it's possible. If the result of comparing the first field returns zero, then return the result of comparing the second field.

public int compareTo(SomeClass o) {
    int result = field1.compareTo(o.field1);
    if ( result == 0 ) {
        result = field2.compareTo(o.field2);
    }
    return result;
}

This gets cumbersome fairly quickly, which is why Guava provides a ComparisonChain. Example use:

public int compareTo(SomeClass o) {
    return ComparisonChain.start()
         .compare(field1, o.field1)
         .compare(field2, o.field2)
         .result();
}
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and also pretty nested really quick, why @aix's Solution should be preferred –  Simon Woker Dec 13 '11 at 15:12
2  
@Simon: If you have more than two, you shouldn't be using either my first solution or aix's; use a helper like I listed. –  Mark Peters Dec 13 '11 at 15:14
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You can certainly factor in other fields when comparing, but there's typically some order of precedence, just like sorting alphabetically only looks at the second letter if the first is the same:

public int compareTo(Object o){

   int comparison = field.compareTo(o.field);
   if (comparison != 0)
      return comparison;
   comparison = field2.compareTo(o.field2);
   if (comparison != 0)
      return comparison;
   //etc...
}
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sure you can. however you must define the rule of comparison .

e.g.

you have

objectA{a=1;b=2;c=3}
objectB{a=20;b=1;c=6}

in your compareTo(Object o) method, you could compare this.fields with o.fields. you can even compare this.a to o.c if you really need. point is you have to define the rule, in which case objectA < objectB. etc..

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Sure. Here's a relatively concise way of doing it.

public int compareTo(MyClass other) {
    return
        a!=other.a ? Integer.compare(a, other.a) :
        b!=other.b ? Integer.compare(b, other.b) :
                     Integer.compare(c, other.c);
}

(Integer.compare is from Java SE 7, but the implementation isn't difficult. Assumes int fields a, b, c, but is essentially the same for any field types you can compare.)

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Concise, but you're doing most comparisons twice. That might be needlessly expensive for non-primitives. –  Mark Peters Dec 13 '11 at 15:19
    
The equality comparison is likely to be substantially faster in many cases. Substitute (x<other.x ? -1 : 1) if you must have absolutely fastest performance. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 13 '11 at 15:22
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public int compareTo(Object o){
  int res = field.compareTo(o.field);
  if(res==0)
    res=field1.compareTo(o.field1);
  return res;
}

should work

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You can do it any of following ways:

public int compareTo(Object o)
{    
    return (field.compareTo(o.field)==1 && field2.compareTo(o.field2)==0)? 0 : 1; 
} 

OR

public int compareTo(Object o)
{
    // add various if-else blocks
    // OR
    // call a separate method    
}
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3  
You are returning a boolean instead of an int. And it's just very wrong. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 13 '11 at 15:16
    
@TomHawtin-tackline: thanks. updated. –  Azodious Dec 13 '11 at 15:25
1  
It still doesn't make any sense. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 13 '11 at 15:30
    
If you are pointing towards checking for 1 and 0 respectively, i just wanted to show OP that it's possible. logic for comparision he can have whatever he wants. –  Azodious Dec 13 '11 at 16:17
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