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Callbacks to C# from unmanaged C++ are tricky. I learned most of the required cruft from this MSDN article and this stackoverflow tip, and the result works fine in the debugger. But outside of the debugger it fails with "Object reference not set to an instance of an object".

Here's the (simplified) C# code:

class CSharpCode
{
    delegate void CallbackDelegate();

    void DoCSharp()
    {
        CallbackDelegate callbackDelegate = TheCallback;
        IntPtr callbackDelegatePointer = Marshal.GetFunctionPointerForDelegate(callbackDelegate);
        GCHandle gchCallbackDelegate = GCHandle.Alloc(callbackDelegatePointer);

        GC.Collect(); // create max space for unmanaged allocations
        CppCliCode.DoCppCli(callbackDelegatePointer);
    }

    public static void TheCallback()
    {
        MessageBox.Show("It worked");
    }
}

And here's the C++ code:

#pragma managed

public ref class CppCliCode
{
    static void DoCppCli(IntPtr^ callbackDelegatePointer)
    {
        callback theCallback = static_cast<callback>(callbackDelegatePointer->ToPointer());
        DoCpp(theCallback);
    }
}

#pragma unmanaged

typedef void (__stdcall *callback)();

void DoCpp(callback theCallback)
{
    theCallback();
}

The error occurs somewhere between invoking theCallback() and arriving at TheCallback(). The error suggests that some invisible managed object has become null.

If I remove the GC.Collect() the problem goes away. But that just means it will reappear someday as an intermittent mystery when a GC happens to occur at the wrong moment.

The GCHandle protects the delegate from being collected but allows it to be relocated. The MSDN article says "If a delegate is re-located by a garbage collection, it will not affect the underlaying managed callback, so Alloc is used to add a reference to the delegate, allowing relocation of the delegate, but preventing disposal. Using GCHandle instead of pin_ptr reduces fragmentation potential of the managed heap."

What's wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
Possibly your code violates this rule: You must manually keep the delegate from being collected by the garbage collector from managed code (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…). Try to define callbackDelegate variable in C# as class member. –  Alex Farber Dec 13 '11 at 15:15
4  
The GCHandle keeps the wrong object alive. You'd have a leak if you do it right. Instead add GC.KeepAlive(callbackDelegate) at the end of the method. Same thing the debugger does. –  Hans Passant Dec 13 '11 at 16:09
    
@HansPassant why didn't you post this as an answer? –  noah1989 Dec 13 '11 at 16:17
    
Because explaining how to do it properly is a lot more work. Don't have the time right now. –  Hans Passant Dec 13 '11 at 16:27
    
GC.KeepAlive(callbackDelegate) does fix the problem! If @HansPassant wants to post an answer I'll accept it. –  Rick Mohr Dec 13 '11 at 16:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You must allocate the delegate itself, not its IntPtr. Also you must free the GCHandle when you are done with CSharpCode instance.

class CSharpCode : IDisposible
{
    delegate void CallbackDelegate();
    GCHandle gchCallbackDelegate;

    void DoCSharp()
    {
        CallbackDelegate callbackDelegate = TheCallback;
        IntPtr callbackDelegatePointer = Marshal.GetFunctionPointerForDelegate(callbackDelegate);
        gchCallbackDelegate = GCHandle.Alloc(callbackDelegate); // !!!!

        GC.Collect(); // create max space for unmanaged allocations
        CppCliCode.DoCppCli(callbackDelegatePointer);
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        CleanUp();
    }

    ~CSharpCode()
    {
        CleanUp();
    } 

    CleanUp()
    {
        if(gchCallbackDelegate.IsAllocated)
            gchCallbackDelegate.Free();
    }


}

By the way I hope you have more powerful naming system of yours. Names like DoCSharp, TheCallBack, theCallBack etc. gave me a hard time to understand the question.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for spotting my error, hanging onto the delegate does in fact work. Sorry the naming was confusing. –  Rick Mohr Dec 14 '11 at 18:48
    
Thanks for this simple example. It cleared up a couple questions I had and was very helpful! –  Paul H. Oct 20 '12 at 0:29

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