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Using backbone.js...

@model.bind 'change', ()-> console.log 'updated'

addIndex = (index) =>
    array = @model.get('array')
    array.push index
    @model.set
        array: array

This updates the model perfectly but doesn't trigger the change event. Does anyone know why from looking at what I posted?

EDIT:

I added this and it triggers the change event:

@model.set
    test: ''

num = 0
setInterval ()=>
    num++
    @model.set
    test: num
, 3000

I added this and it doesn't trigger the change event:

@model.set
    test: []

num = 0
setInterval ()=>
    console.log 'testupdate'
    num++
    test = @model.get('test')
    test.push num
    @model.set
        test: test
, 3000
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is the array getting populated? –  Brian Dec 13 '11 at 15:18
    
Yea the model updates fine, and the array is correctly populated in the models attributes. –  fancy Dec 13 '11 at 15:20
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5 Answers

Brian's answer as to the reason is awesome!

Wanted to present another way to get what you want instead of nulling it out or cloning the array.

Just manually trigger the change yourself:

addIndex = (index) =>
    array = @model.get('array')
    array.push index
    @model.trigger('change:array',@model, array)
share|improve this answer
    
If you have a particularly large array cloning it is a poor option. This makes way more sense. –  Code Commander Mar 27 '13 at 15:12
    
With this solution model.changed won't be updated. –  postnerd May 15 at 20:38
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Since you're setting the referenced object, use _.clone().

test = _.clone @model.get('test')
test.push num
@model.set test: test

Since you're no longer using the referenced object/array to set itself, it will fire the change event if it has changed.

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The problem is that you are setting the value with the existing value. Take a look at the source code:

http://documentcloud.github.com/backbone/docs/backbone.html#section-33

When you call set it has a guard clause to make sure that you are not setting the same value (to avoid event loops). In your case, you are getting the array, modifying it, and setting it again, which will not trigger your event.

Of course, when you set test: {}, it is a new item with a new object, so it will trigger again. If you really want to trigger the event, you can set it to null, then set it to an empty array and then to the populated array again...

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Another way to go, when changing objects or arrays, is to silently unset the property before setting the new updated value. Something like this:

(function() {
    var arr, model = new Model();

    model.set( "arrayProp", [1, 2, 3] );
    arr = model.get( "arrayProp" );
    arr.push( 4 );

    model.unset( "arrayProp", { silent: true } );
    model.set( "arrayProp", arr );
})();

By setting silent: true when unsetting the prop, the change event will only fire once (When the set() method is called and the property has been updated).

There isn't really a difference between doing this or manually calling the event, it's just a matter of personal preference.

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I prefer this option - this way Backbone fires all of the event variants (change and change:arrayProp) with default parameters, so it won't break any listeners. –  joews May 15 at 15:59
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Could you consider using a Backbone collection instead of an array, and then binding to change events in that collection?

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