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I am using a recursive function for a object tree. That is, my object collection is like:

Object1
--Object2
----Object3
------Object4

All objects inherits from a base object (abstract class), where has a Validate() method, and its collection inherits from ITreeCollection. I have written a recursive function to perform that:

private bool Validate<T>(ITreeCollection items) where T : TreeNodeBase
        {
            foreach (var itm in items as Collection<T>)
            {
                if (((TreeNodeBase)itm).Items != null)
                {
                    return Validate<T>(((TreeNodeBase)itm).Items);
                }
                else return true;
            }
            return true;
        }

How can I derive the the type parameter T for the inner function (i.e. return Validate<T>(((TreeNodeBase)itm).Items))

Please let me know if I am not making myself.

Thanks, Bhaskar

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1  
Side note: avoid as cast if cases where you do not immediately check for null as you convert a perfectly intelligible cast exception into a null ref exception and quite often at a code site unrelated to the cast. –  Paul Ruane Dec 13 '11 at 15:27
1  
Another side note: your loop returns after validating the first item in the list of items. I imagine you only want to return if Validate returns false so that the rest of the items get validated. As it stands you'll get the result for the very first leaf. –  Paul Ruane Dec 13 '11 at 15:31
2  
It does not look like you need any generics here at all: replace T with TreeNodeBase, and things would just work. –  dasblinkenlight Dec 13 '11 at 15:36
    
@dasblinkenlight - You are right, thanks a lot for pointing out, +1 for you..... –  Bhaskar Dec 14 '11 at 5:38
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Firstly, as it stands, you are not using the type parameter T so it could safely be removed. However I imagine you might want to do some type specific validation so this is perhaps not that helpful a suggestion. But, without example of what you want to do with T it's difficult to make suggestions.

Anyhow, here's one approach of what I think you are trying to do:

private bool Validate(ITreeCollection items)
{
    foreach (TreeNodeBase node in (IEnumerable) items)
    {
        // validate the node itself first
        if (!Validate(node))
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (node.Items != null)
        {
            // validate its children
            if (!Validate(node.Items)
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }

    return true;
}

private bool Validate(TreeNodeBase node)
{
    if (node is BananaNode)
    {
        var bananaNode = (BananaNode) node;
        //TODO do BananaNode specific validation
    }
    else if (node is AppleNode)
    {
        var appleNode = (AppleNode) node;
        //TODO do AppleNode specific validation
    }
    else
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Cannot validate node of type '" + node.GetType().Name + "'.");
    }
}

You could get snazzy with the dynamic keyword and get rid of some of this type checking but it does get a bit confusing and I'd advise against it:

private bool Validate(ITreeCollection items)
{
    foreach (TreeNodeBase node in (IEnumerable) items)
    {
        // validate the node itself first
        if (!Validate((dynamic) node)) // this will call the most appropriate version of Validate
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (node.Items != null)
        {
            // validate its children
            if (!Validate(node.Items)
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }

    return true;
}

private bool Validate(BananaNode node)
{
    //TODO do BananaNode specific validation
}

private bool Validate(AppleNode node)
{
    //TODO do AppleNode specific validation
}

private bool Validate(TreeNodeBase node)
{
    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Cannot validate node of type '" + node.GetType().Name + "'.");
}
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