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I have some trouble with removing a empty vector in a vector using the remove-erase idiom like Erasing elements from a vector. How can I apply this on:

vector<vector<Point> > contours; // want to remove contours.at(i).empty()
contours.erase(remove(contours.begin(), contours.end(), ??? ),contours.end());
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Do you have C++11? –  Chad Dec 13 '11 at 15:29
    
Yes, I have C++11. –  aagaard Dec 13 '11 at 15:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Have you tried:

contours.erase(remove(contours.begin(), contours.end(), vector<Point>()), contours.end());
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+1, smart, comparing it to an empty vector! –  Nim Dec 13 '11 at 15:32
1  
Indeed: it might be overkill in the sense that the compiler might emit more code than strictly necessary, but it's concise. –  Steve Jessop Dec 13 '11 at 15:34
    
Assuming than the comparison is cheap which it should be, this is a great solution! –  111111 Dec 13 '11 at 15:35
1  
The comparison should be cheap as the first thing vector::operator== does is to compare size() for both sides. –  Blastfurnace Dec 13 '11 at 15:39
    
Thanks, that was what I needed! –  aagaard Dec 13 '11 at 15:42

Use remove_if that takes a predicate.

contours.erase(
    std::remove_if(
         contours.begin(), contours.end(),
         [](const vector<Point>& v) { return v.empty(); }
         // or a functor/plain function/Boost.Lambda expression
    ), contours.end()
);
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It's works! Nice suggestion, I actually looked at during it with lambda expressions, so thank you for your suggestion. –  aagaard Dec 13 '11 at 15:46
    
Although everybody likes lambdas, I find std::mem_fn(&std::vector<Point>::empty) even more concise and clear. –  Christian Rau Jan 14 '13 at 12:11

use remove_if.

C++11

contours.erase(
    std::remove_if(contours.begin(), contours.end(), 
        [&](const Vector<Point>& vp){
            return vp.empty();
        }),
        contours.end());

C++03

struct is_empty
{
    bool operator()(const Vector<Point>& vp) constt;
    {
        return vp.empty();
    }
}


contours.erase(
         std::remove_if(contours.begin(), contours.end(), 
         is_empty,
         contours.end());
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1  
You don't need a custom functor in C++03, a simple std::mem_fun_ref(&std::vector<Point>::empty) should suffice. –  Christian Rau Dec 14 '12 at 9:05
    
The same holds for C++11, just with std::mem_fn, where it's also more concise and conceptually cleaner than a lambda, but Ok, that is maybe rather a matter of taste. But for C++03, not using its scarce functional facilities when they finally make perfect sense is a little bit of a crime ;) –  Christian Rau Dec 14 '12 at 9:11
    
By the way, it should be const istead of constt and is_empty() instead of just is_empty inside the function call. –  Christian Rau Dec 14 '12 at 9:12

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