Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need a basic function to find the shortest distance between a point and a line segment. Feel free to write the solution in any language you want; I can translate it into what I'm using (Javascript).

EDIT: My line segment is defined by two endpoints. So my line segment AB is defined by the two points A (x1,y1) and B (x2,y2). I'm trying to find the distance between this line segment and a point C (x3,y3). My geometry skills are rusty, so the examples I've seen are confusing, I'm sorry to admit.

share|improve this question
3  
@ArthurKalliokoski: that link is dead, but I've found a copy: paulbourke.net/geometry/pointline –  Gunther Struyf Oct 5 '12 at 10:28
4  
@GuntherStruyf: that link is dead too, but this similar link works: paulbourke.net/geometry/pointlineplane –  Michael Mar 8 '13 at 22:44

34 Answers 34

up vote 204 down vote accepted

Eli, the code you've settled on is incorrect. A point near the line on which the segment lies but far off one end of the segment would be incorrectly judged near the segment. Update: The incorrect answer mentioned is no longer the accepted one.

Here's some correct code, in C++. It presumes a class 2D-vector class vec2 {float x,y;}, essentially, with operators to add, subract, scale, etc, and a distance and dot product function (i.e. x1 x2 + y1 y2).

float minimum_distance(vec2 v, vec2 w, vec2 p) {
  // Return minimum distance between line segment vw and point p
  const float l2 = length_squared(v, w);  // i.e. |w-v|^2 -  avoid a sqrt
  if (l2 == 0.0) return distance(p, v);   // v == w case
  // Consider the line extending the segment, parameterized as v + t (w - v).
  // We find projection of point p onto the line. 
  // It falls where t = [(p-v) . (w-v)] / |w-v|^2
  const float t = dot(p - v, w - v) / l2;
  if (t < 0.0) return distance(p, v);       // Beyond the 'v' end of the segment
  else if (t > 1.0) return distance(p, w);  // Beyond the 'w' end of the segment
  const vec2 projection = v + t * (w - v);  // Projection falls on the segment
  return distance(p, projection);
}

EDIT: I needed a Javascript implementation, so here it is, with no dependencies (or comments, but it's a direct port of the above). Points are represented as objects with x and y attributes.

function sqr(x) { return x * x }
function dist2(v, w) { return sqr(v.x - w.x) + sqr(v.y - w.y) }
function distToSegmentSquared(p, v, w) {
  var l2 = dist2(v, w);
  if (l2 == 0) return dist2(p, v);
  var t = ((p.x - v.x) * (w.x - v.x) + (p.y - v.y) * (w.y - v.y)) / l2;
  if (t < 0) return dist2(p, v);
  if (t > 1) return dist2(p, w);
  return dist2(p, { x: v.x + t * (w.x - v.x),
                    y: v.y + t * (w.y - v.y) });
}
function distToSegment(p, v, w) { return Math.sqrt(distToSegmentSquared(p, v, w)); }
share|improve this answer
4  
thank you Grumdrig! –  Aaron May 18 '10 at 18:09
1  
I've added a fleshed-out version of this as a separate answer. –  M Katz Jun 8 '12 at 22:13
2  
Thanks @Grumdrig, your javascript solution was spot on and a huge time saver. I ported your solution to Objective-C and added it below. –  awolf Aug 29 '12 at 19:57

This is an implementation made for FINITE LINE SEGMENTS, not infinite lines like most other functions here seem to be (that's why I made this).

Example is here.

Python:

import math

def dist(x1,y1, x2,y2, x3,y3): # x3,y3 is the point
    px = x2-x1
    py = y2-y1

    something = px*px + py*py

    u =  ((x3 - x1) * px + (y3 - y1) * py) / float(something)

    if u > 1:
        u = 1
    elif u < 0:
        u = 0

    x = x1 + u * px
    y = y1 + u * py

    dx = x - x3
    dy = y - y3

    # Note: If the actual distance does not matter,
    # if you only want to compare what this function
    # returns to other results of this function, you
    # can just return the squared distance instead
    # (i.e. remove the sqrt) to gain a little performance

    dist = math.sqrt(dx*dx + dy*dy)

    return dist

AS3:

public static function segmentDistToPoint(segA:Point, segB:Point, p:Point):Number
{
    var p2:Point = new Point(segB.x - segA.x, segB.y - segA.y);
    var something:Number = p2.x*p2.x + p2.y*p2.y;
    var u:Number = ((p.x - segA.x) * p2.x + (p.y - segA.y) * p2.y) / something;

    if (u > 1)
        u = 1;
    else if (u < 0)
        u = 0;

    var x:Number = segA.x + u * p2.x;
    var y:Number = segA.y + u * p2.y;

    var dx:Number = x - p.x;
    var dy:Number = y - p.y;

    var dist:Number = Math.sqrt(dx*dx + dy*dy);

    return dist;
}

These were made from this.

share|improve this answer
1  
Sorry, but I tried this and it still gives me the results as if the line was extending into infinity. I've found Grumdig's answer to work, though. –  Frederik Apr 22 '10 at 15:18
1  
In that case you're using it wrong or meaning something else with non-infinite. See an example of this code here: boomie.se/upload/Drawdebug.swf –  quano Apr 22 '10 at 20:10
10  
The choice of variable names is far from good (p2, something, u, ...) –  miguelSantirso Aug 23 '12 at 20:24
1  
I've tried the Python version of the function and found that it shows incorrect results if the parameters are integers. distAnother(0, 0, 4, 0, 2, 2) gives 2.8284271247461903 (incorrect). distAnother(0., 0., 4., 0., 2., 2.) gives 2.0 (correct). Please be aware of this. I think the code can be improved to have float conversion somewhere. –  Vladimir Obrizan Feb 3 '13 at 21:20

Here is the simplest complete code in Javascript.

x, y is your target point and x1, y1 to x2, y2 is your line segment.

function pDistance(x, y, x1, y1, x2, y2) {

  var A = x - x1;
  var B = y - y1;
  var C = x2 - x1;
  var D = y2 - y1;

  var dot = A * C + B * D;
  var len_sq = C * C + D * D;
  var param = dot / len_sq;

  var xx, yy;

  if (param < 0 || (x1 == x2 && y1 == y2)) {
    xx = x1;
    yy = y1;
  }
  else if (param > 1) {
    xx = x2;
    yy = y2;
  }
  else {
    xx = x1 + param * C;
    yy = y1 + param * D;
  }

  var dx = x - xx;
  var dy = y - yy;
  return Math.sqrt(dx * dx + dy * dy);
}

Update: Added ( || (x1 == x2 && y1 == y2)) to accomodate a line segment with length of 0.

share|improve this answer
3  
Of all the code I've seen to solve this problem, I like this one the best. It is very clear and easy to read. The math behind it though, is a little bit mystical. What does the dot-product divided by the length squared really represent, for example? –  user1815201 Sep 27 '13 at 8:37
1  
The dot product divided by length squared gives you the projection distance from (x1, y1). This is the fraction of the line that the point (x,y) is closest to. Notice the final else clause where (xx, yy) is calculated - this the projection of the point (x,y) onto the segment (x1,y1)-(x2,y2). –  Logan Pickup Feb 17 at 23:10
2  
The check for line segments of length 0 is too far down in the code. 'len_sq' will be zero and the code will divide by 0 before it gets to the safety check. –  Heliodor Aug 21 at 14:33

In F#, the distance from the point c to the line segment between a and b is given by:

let pointToLineSegmentDistance (a: Vector, b: Vector) (c: Vector) =
  let d = b - a
  let s = d.Length
  let lambda = (c - a) * d / s
  let p = (lambda |> max 0.0 |> min s) * d
  (p - c).Length

The vector d points from a to b along the line segment. The dot product of d/s with c-a gives the parameter of the point of closest approach between the infinite line and the point c. The min and max function are used to clamp this parameter to the range 0..s so that the point lies between a and b. Finally, the length of p-c is the distance from c to the closest point on the line segment.

Example use:

pointToLineSegmentDistance (Vector(0.0, 0.0), Vector(1.0, 0.0)) (Vector(-1.0, 1.0))
share|improve this answer
1  
I think the last line is incorrect, and should read: (a + p - c).Length –  Blair Holloway Jun 3 at 1:36

I don't know how you're representing lines and points, but here's all the mathematics you need to get started. Shouldn't be too hard to figure out what you need to do

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Point-LineDistance2-Dimensional.html

http://paulbourke.net/geometry/pointline/

share|improve this answer

In my own question thread how to calculate shortest 2D distance between a point and a line segment in all cases in C, C# / .NET 2.0 or Java? I was asked to put a C# answer here when I find one: so here it is, modified from http://www.topcoder.com/tc?d1=tutorials&d2=geometry1&module=Static :

//Compute the dot product AB . AC
private double DotProduct(double[] pointA, double[] pointB, double[] pointC)
{
    double[] AB = new double[2];
    double[] BC = new double[2];
    AB[0] = pointB[0] - pointA[0];
    AB[1] = pointB[1] - pointA[1];
    BC[0] = pointC[0] - pointB[0];
    BC[1] = pointC[1] - pointB[1];
    double dot = AB[0] * BC[0] + AB[1] * BC[1];

    return dot;
}

//Compute the cross product AB x AC
private double CrossProduct(double[] pointA, double[] pointB, double[] pointC)
{
    double[] AB = new double[2];
    double[] AC = new double[2];
    AB[0] = pointB[0] - pointA[0];
    AB[1] = pointB[1] - pointA[1];
    AC[0] = pointC[0] - pointA[0];
    AC[1] = pointC[1] - pointA[1];
    double cross = AB[0] * AC[1] - AB[1] * AC[0];

    return cross;
}

//Compute the distance from A to B
double Distance(double[] pointA, double[] pointB)
{
    double d1 = pointA[0] - pointB[0];
    double d2 = pointA[1] - pointB[1];

    return Math.Sqrt(d1 * d1 + d2 * d2);
}

//Compute the distance from AB to C
//if isSegment is true, AB is a segment, not a line.
double LineToPointDistance2D(double[] pointA, double[] pointB, double[] pointC, 
    bool isSegment)
{
    double dist = CrossProduct(pointA, pointB, pointC) / Distance(pointA, pointB);
    if (isSegment)
    {
        double dot1 = DotProduct(pointA, pointB, pointC);
        if (dot1 > 0) 
            return Distance(pointB, pointC);

        double dot2 = DotProduct(pointB, pointA, pointC);
        if (dot2 > 0) 
            return Distance(pointA, pointC);
    }
    return Math.Abs(dist);
} 

I'm @SO not to answer but ask questions so I hope I don't get million down votes for some reasons but constructing critic. I just wanted (and was encouraged) to share somebody else's ideas since the solutions in this thread are either with some exotic language (Fortran, Mathematica) or tagged as faulty by somebody. The only useful one (by Grumdrig) for me is written with C++ and nobody tagged it faulty. But it's missing the methods (dot etc.) that are called.

share|improve this answer

In Mathematica

It uses a parametric description of the segment, and projects the point into the line defined by the segment. As the parameter goes from 0 to 1 in the segment, if the projection is outside this bounds, we compute the distance to the corresponding enpoint, instead of the straight line normal to the segment.

Clear["Global`*"];
 distance[{start_, end_}, pt_] := 
   Module[{param},
   param = ((pt - start).(end - start))/Norm[end - start]^2; (*parameter. the "."
                                                       here means vector product*)

   Which[
    param < 0, EuclideanDistance[start, pt],                 (*If outside bounds*)
    param > 1, EuclideanDistance[end, pt],
    True, EuclideanDistance[pt, start + param (end - start)] (*Normal distance*)
    ]
   ];  

Plotting result:

Plot3D[distance[{{0, 0}, {1, 0}}, {xp, yp}], {xp, -1, 2}, {yp, -1, 2}]

alt text

Plot those points nearer than a cutoff distance:

alt text

Contour Plot:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Hey, I just wrote this yesterday. It's in Actionscript 3.0, which is basically Javascript, though you might not have the same Point class.

//st = start of line segment
//b = the line segment (as in: st + b = end of line segment)
//pt = point to test
//Returns distance from point to line segment.  
//Note: nearest point on the segment to the test point is right there if we ever need it
public static function linePointDist( st:Point, b:Point, pt:Point ):Number
{
    var nearestPt:Point; //closest point on seqment to pt

    var keyDot:Number = dot( b, pt.subtract( st ) ); //key dot product
    var bLenSq:Number = dot( b, b ); //Segment length squared

    if( keyDot <= 0 )  //pt is "behind" st, use st
    {
        nearestPt = st  
    }
    else if( keyDot >= bLenSq ) //pt is "past" end of segment, use end (notice we are saving twin sqrts here cuz)
    {
        nearestPt = st.add(b);
    }
    else //pt is inside segment, reuse keyDot and bLenSq to get percent of seqment to move in to find closest point
    {
        var keyDotToPctOfB:Number = keyDot/bLenSq; //REM dot product comes squared
        var partOfB:Point = new Point( b.x * keyDotToPctOfB, b.y * keyDotToPctOfB );
        nearestPt = st.add(partOfB);
    }

    var dist:Number = (pt.subtract(nearestPt)).length;

    return dist;
}

Also, there's a pretty complete and readable discussion of the problem here: notejot.com

share|improve this answer

Couldn't resist coding it in python :)

from math import sqrt, fabs
def pdis(a, b, c):
    t = b[0]-a[0], b[1]-a[1]           # Vector ab
    dd = sqrt(t[0]**2+t[1]**2)         # Length of ab
    t = t[0]/dd, t[1]/dd               # unit vector of ab
    n = -t[1], t[0]                    # normal unit vector to ab
    ac = c[0]-a[0], c[1]-a[1]          # vector ac
    return fabs(ac[0]*n[0]+ac[1]*n[1]) # Projection of ac to n (the minimum distance)

print pdis((1,1), (2,2), (2,0))        # Example (answer is 1.414)


Ditto for fortran :)

real function pdis(a, b, c)
    real, dimension(0:1), intent(in) :: a, b, c
    real, dimension(0:1) :: t, n, ac
    real :: dd
    t = b - a                          ! Vector ab
    dd = sqrt(t(0)**2+t(1)**2)         ! Length of ab
    t = t/dd                           ! unit vector of ab
    n = (/-t(1), t(0)/)                ! normal unit vector to ab
    ac = c - a                         ! vector ac
    pdis = abs(ac(0)*n(0)+ac(1)*n(1))  ! Projection of ac to n (the minimum distance)
end function pdis


program test
    print *, pdis((/1.0,1.0/), (/2.0,2.0/), (/2.0,0.0/))   ! Example (answer is 1.414)
end program test
share|improve this answer
9  
isn't this computing the distance of a point to a line instead of the segment? –  balint.miklos Jun 18 '09 at 8:32
6  
This is indeed the distance to the line the segment is on, not to the segment. –  Grumdrig Oct 22 '09 at 17:05
12  
This doesn't seem to work. If you've got a segment of (0,0) and (5,0), and try against point (7,0), it will return 0, which isn't true. The distance should be 2. –  quano Feb 9 '10 at 22:32
7  
He's failed to consider the case where the projection of the point onto the segment is outside the interval from A to B. That might be what the questioner wanted, but not what he asked. –  phkahler Feb 10 '10 at 16:32
5  
This is not what was originally asked. –  Sambatyon Feb 24 '10 at 13:54

For the lazy, here's my Objective-C port of @Grumdrig's solution above:

CGFloat sqr(CGFloat x) { return x*x; }
CGFloat dist2(CGPoint v, CGPoint w) { return sqr(v.x - w.x) + sqr(v.y - w.y); }
CGFloat distanceToSegmentSquared(CGPoint p, CGPoint v, CGPoint w)
{
    CGFloat l2 = dist2(v, w);
    if (l2 == 0.0f) return dist2(p, v);

    CGFloat t = ((p.x - v.x) * (w.x - v.x) + (p.y - v.y) * (w.y - v.y)) / l2;
    if (t < 0.0f) return dist2(p, v);
    if (t > 1.0f) return dist2(p, w);
    return dist2(p, CGPointMake(v.x + t * (w.x - v.x), v.y + t * (w.y - v.y)));
}
CGFloat distanceToSegment(CGPoint point, CGPoint segmentPointV, CGPoint segmentPointW)
{
    return sqrtf(distanceToSegmentSquared(point, segmentPointV, segmentPointW));
}
share|improve this answer

For anyone interested, here's a trivial conversion of Joshua's Javascript code to Objective-C:

- (double)distanceToPoint:(CGPoint)p fromLineSegmentBetween:(CGPoint)l1 and:(CGPoint)l2
{
    double A = p.x - l1.x;
    double B = p.y - l1.y;
    double C = l2.x - l1.x;
    double D = l2.y - l1.y;

    double dot = A * C + B * D;
    double len_sq = C * C + D * D;
    double param = dot / len_sq;

    double xx, yy;

    if (param < 0 || (l1.x == l2.x && l1.y == l2.y)) {
        xx = l1.x;
        yy = l1.y;
    }
    else if (param > 1) {
        xx = l2.x;
        yy = l2.y;
    }
    else {
        xx = l1.x + param * C;
        yy = l1.y + param * D;
    }

    double dx = p.x - xx;
    double dy = p.y - yy;

    return sqrtf(dx * dx + dy * dy);
}

I needed this solution to work with MKMapPoint so I will share it in case someone else needs it. Just some minor change and this will return the distance in meters :

- (double)distanceToPoint:(MKMapPoint)p fromLineSegmentBetween:(MKMapPoint)l1 and:(MKMapPoint)l2
{
    double A = p.x - l1.x;
    double B = p.y - l1.y;
    double C = l2.x - l1.x;
    double D = l2.y - l1.y;

    double dot = A * C + B * D;
    double len_sq = C * C + D * D;
    double param = dot / len_sq;

    double xx, yy;

    if (param < 0 || (l1.x == l2.x && l1.y == l2.y)) {
        xx = l1.x;
        yy = l1.y;
    }
    else if (param > 1) {
        xx = l2.x;
        yy = l2.y;
    }
    else {
        xx = l1.x + param * C;
        yy = l1.y + param * D;
    }

    return MKMetersBetweenMapPoints(p, MKMapPointMake(xx, yy));
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a more complete spelling out of Grumdrig's solution. This version also returns the closest point itself.

#include "stdio.h"
#include "math.h"

class Vec2
{
public:
    float _x;
    float _y;

    Vec2()
    {
        _x = 0;
        _y = 0;
    }

    Vec2( const float x, const float y )
    {
        _x = x;
        _y = y;
    }

    Vec2 operator+( const Vec2 &v ) const
    {
        return Vec2( this->_x + v._x, this->_y + v._y );
    }

    Vec2 operator-( const Vec2 &v ) const
    {
        return Vec2( this->_x - v._x, this->_y - v._y );
    }

    Vec2 operator*( const float f ) const
    {
        return Vec2( this->_x * f, this->_y * f );
    }

    float DistanceToSquared( const Vec2 p ) const
    {
        const float dX = p._x - this->_x;
        const float dY = p._y - this->_y;

        return dX * dX + dY * dY;
    }

    float DistanceTo( const Vec2 p ) const
    {
        return sqrt( this->DistanceToSquared( p ) );
    }

    float DotProduct( const Vec2 p ) const
    {
        return this->_x * p._x + this->_y * p._y;
    }
};

// return minimum distance between line segment vw and point p, and the closest point on the line segment, q
float DistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint( const Vec2 v, const Vec2 w, const Vec2 p, Vec2 * const q )
{
    const float distSq = v.DistanceToSquared( w ); // i.e. |w-v|^2 ... avoid a sqrt
    if ( distSq == 0.0 )
    {
        // v == w case
        (*q) = v;

        return v.DistanceTo( p );
    }

    // consider the line extending the segment, parameterized as v + t (w - v)
    // we find projection of point p onto the line
    // it falls where t = [(p-v) . (w-v)] / |w-v|^2

    const float t = ( p - v ).DotProduct( w - v ) / distSq;
    if ( t < 0.0 )
    {
        // beyond the v end of the segment
        (*q) = v;

        return v.DistanceTo( p );
    }
    else if ( t > 1.0 )
    {
        // beyond the w end of the segment
        (*q) = w;

        return w.DistanceTo( p );
    }

    // projection falls on the segment
    const Vec2 projection = v + ( ( w - v ) * t );

    (*q) = projection;

    return p.DistanceTo( projection );
}

float DistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint( float segmentX1, float segmentY1, float segmentX2, float segmentY2, float pX, float pY, float *qX, float *qY )
{
    Vec2 q;

    float distance = DistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint( Vec2( segmentX1, segmentY1 ), Vec2( segmentX2, segmentY2 ), Vec2( pX, pY ), &q );

    (*qX) = q._x;
    (*qY) = q._y;

    return distance;
}

void TestDistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint( float segmentX1, float segmentY1, float segmentX2, float segmentY2, float pX, float pY )
{
    float qX;
    float qY;
    float d = DistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint( segmentX1, segmentY1, segmentX2, segmentY2, pX, pY, &qX, &qY );
    printf( "line segment = ( ( %f, %f ), ( %f, %f ) ), p = ( %f, %f ), distance = %f, q = ( %f, %f )\n",
            segmentX1, segmentY1, segmentX2, segmentY2, pX, pY, d, qX, qY );
}

void TestDistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint()
{
    TestDistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint( 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0 );
    TestDistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint( 0, 0, 20, 10, 5, 4 );
    TestDistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint( 0, 0, 20, 10, 30, 15 );
    TestDistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint( 0, 0, 20, 10, -30, 15 );
    TestDistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint( 0, 0, 10, 0, 5, 1 );
    TestDistanceFromLineSegmentToPoint( 0, 0, 0, 10, 1, 5 );
}
share|improve this answer

I'm assuming you want to find the shortest distance between the point and a line segment; to do this, you need to find the line (lineA) which is perpendicular to your line segment (lineB) which goes through your point, determine the intersection between that line (lineA) and your line which goes through your line segment (lineB); if that point is between the two points of your line segment, then the distance is the distance between your point and the point you just found which is the intersection of lineA and lineB; if the point is not between the two points of your line segment, you need to get the distance between your point and the closer of two ends of the line segment; this can be done easily by taking the square distance (to avoid a square root) between the point and the two points of the line segment; whichever is closer, take the square root of that one.

share|improve this answer

Consider this modification to Grumdrig's answer above. Many times you'll find that floating point imprecision can cause problems. I'm using doubles in the version below, but you can easily change to floats. The important part is that it uses an epsilon to handle the "slop". In addition, you'll many times want to know WHERE the intersection happened, or if it happened at all. If the returned t is < 0.0 or > 1.0, no collision occurred. However, even if no collision occurred, many times you'll want to know where the closest point on the segment to P is, and thus I use qx and qy to return this location.

double PointSegmentDistanceSquared( double px, double py,
                                    double p1x, double p1y,
                                    double p2x, double p2y,
                                    double& t,
                                    double& qx, double& qy)
{
    static const double kMinSegmentLenSquared = 0.00000001;  // adjust to suit.  If you use float, you'll probably want something like 0.000001f
    static const double kEpsilon = 1.0E-14;  // adjust to suit.  If you use floats, you'll probably want something like 1E-7f
    double dx = p2x - p1x;
    double dy = p2y - p1y;
    double dp1x = px - p1x;
    double dp1y = py - p1y;
    const double segLenSquared = (dx * dx) + (dy * dy);
    if (segLenSquared >= -kMinSegmentLenSquared && segLenSquared <= kMinSegmentLenSquared)
    {
        // segment is a point.
        qx = p1x;
        qy = p1y;
        t = 0.0;
        return ((dp1x * dp1x) + (dp1y * dp1y));
    }
    else
    {
        // Project a line from p to the segment [p1,p2].  By considering the line
        // extending the segment, parameterized as p1 + (t * (p2 - p1)),
        // we find projection of point p onto the line. 
        // It falls where t = [(p - p1) . (p2 - p1)] / |p2 - p1|^2
        t = ((dp1x * dx) + (dp1y * dy)) / segLenSquared;
        if (t < kEpsilon)
        {
            // intersects at or to the "left" of first segment vertex (p1x, p1y).  If t is approximately 0.0, then
            // intersection is at p1.  If t is less than that, then there is no intersection (i.e. p is not within
            // the 'bounds' of the segment)
            if (t > -kEpsilon)
            {
                // intersects at 1st segment vertex
                t = 0.0;
            }
            // set our 'intersection' point to p1.
            qx = p1x;
            qy = p1y;
            // Note: If you wanted the ACTUAL intersection point of where the projected lines would intersect if
            // we were doing PointLineDistanceSquared, then qx would be (p1x + (t * dx)) and qy would be (p1y + (t * dy)).
        }
        else if (t > (1.0 - kEpsilon))
        {
            // intersects at or to the "right" of second segment vertex (p2x, p2y).  If t is approximately 1.0, then
            // intersection is at p2.  If t is greater than that, then there is no intersection (i.e. p is not within
            // the 'bounds' of the segment)
            if (t < (1.0 + kEpsilon))
            {
                // intersects at 2nd segment vertex
                t = 1.0;
            }
            // set our 'intersection' point to p2.
            qx = p2x;
            qy = p2y;
            // Note: If you wanted the ACTUAL intersection point of where the projected lines would intersect if
            // we were doing PointLineDistanceSquared, then qx would be (p1x + (t * dx)) and qy would be (p1y + (t * dy)).
        }
        else
        {
            // The projection of the point to the point on the segment that is perpendicular succeeded and the point
            // is 'within' the bounds of the segment.  Set the intersection point as that projected point.
            qx = p1x + (t * dx);
            qy = p1y + (t * dy);
        }
        // return the squared distance from p to the intersection point.  Note that we return the squared distance
        // as an optimization because many times you just need to compare relative distances and the squared values
        // works fine for that.  If you want the ACTUAL distance, just take the square root of this value.
        double dpqx = px - qx;
        double dpqy = py - qy;
        return ((dpqx * dpqx) + (dpqy * dpqy));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Matlab code, with built-in "self test" if they call the function with no arguments:

function r = distPointToLineSegment( xy0, xy1, xyP )
% r = distPointToLineSegment( xy0, xy1, xyP )

if( nargin < 3 )
  selfTest();
  r=0;
else
vx = xy0(1)-xyP(1);
vy = xy0(2)-xyP(2);
ux = xy1(1)-xy0(1);
uy = xy1(2)-xy0(2);
lenSqr= (ux*ux+uy*uy);
detP= -vx*ux + -vy*uy;

if( detP < 0 )
  r = norm(xy0-xyP,2);
elseif( detP > lenSqr )
  r = norm(xy1-xyP,2);
else
  r = abs(ux*vy-uy*vx)/sqrt(lenSqr);
end
end


 function selfTest()
   %#ok<*NASGU>
 disp(['invalid args, distPointToLineSegment running (recursive)  self-test...']);

ptA = [1;1]; ptB = [-1;-1];
ptC = [1/2;1/2];  % on the line
ptD = [-2;-1.5];  % too far from line segment
ptE = [1/2;0];    % should be same as perpendicular distance to line

distCtoAB = distPointToLineSegment(ptA,ptB,ptC)
distDtoAB = distPointToLineSegment(ptA,ptB,ptD)
distEtoAB = distPointToLineSegment(ptA,ptB,ptE)
figure(1); clf; 
plot([ptA(1) ptB(1)],[ptA(2) ptB(2)],'r-x'); hold on;
plot(ptC(1),ptC(2),'b+'); plot(ptD(1),ptD(2),'g+'); plot(ptE(1),ptE(2),'k+'); hold off;
axis([-3 3 -3 3]);
end

end
share|improve this answer

And now my solution as well...... (Javascript)

It is very fast because I try to avoid any Math.pow functions.

As you can see, at the end of the function I have the distance of the line.

code is from the lib http://www.draw2d.org/graphiti/jsdoc/#!/example

/**
 * Static util function to determine is a point(px,py) on the line(x1,y1,x2,y2)
 * A simple hit test.
 * 
 * @return {boolean}
 * @static
 * @private
 * @param {Number} coronaWidth the accepted corona for the hit test
 * @param {Number} X1 x coordinate of the start point of the line
 * @param {Number} Y1 y coordinate of the start point of the line
 * @param {Number} X2 x coordinate of the end point of the line
 * @param {Number} Y2 y coordinate of the end point of the line
 * @param {Number} px x coordinate of the point to test
 * @param {Number} py y coordinate of the point to test
 **/
graphiti.shape.basic.Line.hit= function( coronaWidth, X1, Y1,  X2,  Y2, px, py)
{
  // Adjust vectors relative to X1,Y1
  // X2,Y2 becomes relative vector from X1,Y1 to end of segment
  X2 -= X1;
  Y2 -= Y1;
  // px,py becomes relative vector from X1,Y1 to test point
  px -= X1;
  py -= Y1;
  var dotprod = px * X2 + py * Y2;
  var projlenSq;
  if (dotprod <= 0.0) {
      // px,py is on the side of X1,Y1 away from X2,Y2
      // distance to segment is length of px,py vector
      // "length of its (clipped) projection" is now 0.0
      projlenSq = 0.0;
  } else {
      // switch to backwards vectors relative to X2,Y2
      // X2,Y2 are already the negative of X1,Y1=>X2,Y2
      // to get px,py to be the negative of px,py=>X2,Y2
      // the dot product of two negated vectors is the same
      // as the dot product of the two normal vectors
      px = X2 - px;
      py = Y2 - py;
      dotprod = px * X2 + py * Y2;
      if (dotprod <= 0.0) {
          // px,py is on the side of X2,Y2 away from X1,Y1
          // distance to segment is length of (backwards) px,py vector
          // "length of its (clipped) projection" is now 0.0
          projlenSq = 0.0;
      } else {
          // px,py is between X1,Y1 and X2,Y2
          // dotprod is the length of the px,py vector
          // projected on the X2,Y2=>X1,Y1 vector times the
          // length of the X2,Y2=>X1,Y1 vector
          projlenSq = dotprod * dotprod / (X2 * X2 + Y2 * Y2);
      }
  }
    // Distance to line is now the length of the relative point
    // vector minus the length of its projection onto the line
    // (which is zero if the projection falls outside the range
    //  of the line segment).
    var lenSq = px * px + py * py - projlenSq;
    if (lenSq < 0) {
        lenSq = 0;
    }
    return Math.sqrt(lenSq)<coronaWidth;
};
share|improve this answer

coded in t-sql

the point is (@px, @py) and the line segment runs from (@ax, @ay) to (@bx, @by)

create function fn_sqr (@NumberToSquare decimal(18,10)) 
returns decimal(18,10)
as 
begin
    declare @Result decimal(18,10)
    set @Result = @NumberToSquare * @NumberToSquare
    return @Result
end
go

create function fn_Distance(@ax decimal (18,10) , @ay decimal (18,10), @bx decimal(18,10),  @by decimal(18,10)) 
returns decimal(18,10)
as
begin
    declare @Result decimal(18,10)
    set @Result = (select dbo.fn_sqr(@ax - @bx) + dbo.fn_sqr(@ay - @by) )
    return @Result
end
go

create function fn_DistanceToSegmentSquared(@px decimal(18,10), @py decimal(18,10), @ax decimal(18,10), @ay decimal(18,10), @bx decimal(18,10), @by decimal(18,10)) 
returns decimal(18,10)
as 
begin
    declare @l2 decimal(18,10)
    set @l2 = (select dbo.fn_Distance(@ax, @ay, @bx, @by))
    if @l2 = 0
        return dbo.fn_Distance(@px, @py, @ax, @ay)
    declare @t decimal(18,10)
    set @t = ((@px - @ax) * (@bx - @ax) + (@py - @ay) * (@by - @ay)) / @l2
    if (@t < 0) 
        return dbo.fn_Distance(@px, @py, @ax, @ay);
    if (@t > 1) 
        return dbo.fn_Distance(@px, @py, @bx, @by);
    return dbo.fn_Distance(@px, @py,  @ax + @t * (@bx - @ax),  @ay + @t * (@by - @ay))
end
go

create function fn_DistanceToSegment(@px decimal(18,10), @py decimal(18,10), @ax decimal(18,10), @ay decimal(18,10), @bx decimal(18,10), @by decimal(18,10)) 
returns decimal(18,10)
as 
begin
    return sqrt(dbo.fn_DistanceToSegmentSquared(@px, @py , @ax , @ay , @bx , @by ))
end
go

--example execution for distance from a point at (6,1) to line segment that runs from (4,2) to (2,1)
select dbo.fn_DistanceToSegment(6, 1, 4, 2, 2, 1) 
--result = 2.2360679775

--example execution for distance from a point at (-3,-2) to line segment that runs from (0,-2) to (-2,1)
select dbo.fn_DistanceToSegment(-3, -2, 0, -2, -2, 1) 
--result = 2.4961508830

--example execution for distance from a point at (0,-2) to line segment that runs from (0,-2) to (-2,1)
select dbo.fn_DistanceToSegment(0,-2, 0, -2, -2, 1) 
--result = 0.0000000000
share|improve this answer

Looks like just about everyone else on StackOverflow has contributed an answer (23 answers so far), so here's my contribution for C#. This is mostly based on the answer by M. Katz, which in turn is based on the answer by Grumdrig.

   public struct MyVector
   {
      private readonly double _x, _y;


      // Constructor
      public MyVector(double x, double y)
      {
         _x = x;
         _y = y;
      }


      // Distance from this point to another point, squared
      private double DistanceSquared(MyVector otherPoint)
      {
         double dx = otherPoint._x - this._x;
         double dy = otherPoint._y - this._y;
         return dx * dx + dy * dy;
      }


      // Find the distance from this point to a line segment (which is not the same as from this 
      //  point to anywhere on an infinite line). Also returns the closest point.
      public double DistanceToLineSegment(MyVector lineSegmentPoint1, MyVector lineSegmentPoint2,
                                          out MyVector closestPoint)
      {
         return Math.Sqrt(DistanceToLineSegmentSquared(lineSegmentPoint1, lineSegmentPoint2, 
                          out closestPoint));
      }


      // Same as above, but avoid using Sqrt(), saves a new nanoseconds in cases where you only want 
      //  to compare several distances to find the smallest or largest, but don't need the distance
      public double DistanceToLineSegmentSquared(MyVector lineSegmentPoint1, 
                                              MyVector lineSegmentPoint2, out MyVector closestPoint)
      {
         // Compute length of line segment (squared) and handle special case of coincident points
         double segmentLengthSquared = lineSegmentPoint1.DistanceSquared(lineSegmentPoint2);
         if (segmentLengthSquared < 1E-7f)  // Arbitrary "close enough for government work" value
         {
            closestPoint = lineSegmentPoint1;
            return this.DistanceSquared(closestPoint);
         }

         // Use the magic formula to compute the "projection" of this point on the infinite line
         MyVector lineSegment = lineSegmentPoint2 - lineSegmentPoint1;
         double t = (this - lineSegmentPoint1).DotProduct(lineSegment) / segmentLengthSquared;

         // Handle the two cases where the projection is not on the line segment, and the case where 
         //  the projection is on the segment
         if (t <= 0)
            closestPoint = lineSegmentPoint1;
         else if (t >= 1)
            closestPoint = lineSegmentPoint2;
         else 
            closestPoint = lineSegmentPoint1 + (lineSegment * t);
         return this.DistanceSquared(closestPoint);
      }


      public double DotProduct(MyVector otherVector)
      {
         return this._x * otherVector._x + this._y * otherVector._y;
      }

      public static MyVector operator +(MyVector leftVector, MyVector rightVector)
      {
         return new MyVector(leftVector._x + rightVector._x, leftVector._y + rightVector._y);
      }

      public static MyVector operator -(MyVector leftVector, MyVector rightVector)
      {
         return new MyVector(leftVector._x - rightVector._x, leftVector._y - rightVector._y);
      }

      public static MyVector operator *(MyVector aVector, double aScalar)
      {
         return new MyVector(aVector._x * aScalar, aVector._y * aScalar);
      }

      // Added using ReSharper due to CodeAnalysis nagging

      public bool Equals(MyVector other)
      {
         return _x.Equals(other._x) && _y.Equals(other._y);
      }

      public override bool Equals(object obj)
      {
         if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) return false;
         return obj is MyVector && Equals((MyVector) obj);
      }

      public override int GetHashCode()
      {
         unchecked
         {
            return (_x.GetHashCode()*397) ^ _y.GetHashCode();
         }
      }

      public static bool operator ==(MyVector left, MyVector right)
      {
         return left.Equals(right);
      }

      public static bool operator !=(MyVector left, MyVector right)
      {
         return !left.Equals(right);
      }
   }

And here's a little test program.

   public static class JustTesting
   {
      public static void Main()
      {
         Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
         stopwatch.Start();

         for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
         {
            TestIt(1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0.70710678118654757);
            TestIt(5, 4, 0, 0, 20, 10, 1.3416407864998738);
            TestIt(30, 15, 0, 0, 20, 10, 11.180339887498949);
            TestIt(-30, 15, 0, 0, 20, 10, 33.541019662496844);
            TestIt(5, 1, 0, 0, 10, 0, 1.0);
            TestIt(1, 5, 0, 0, 0, 10, 1.0);
         }

         stopwatch.Stop();
         TimeSpan timeSpan = stopwatch.Elapsed;
      }


      private static void TestIt(float aPointX, float aPointY, 
                                 float lineSegmentPoint1X, float lineSegmentPoint1Y, 
                                 float lineSegmentPoint2X, float lineSegmentPoint2Y, 
                                 double expectedAnswer)
      {
         // Katz
         double d1 = DistanceFromPointToLineSegment(new MyVector(aPointX, aPointY), 
                                              new MyVector(lineSegmentPoint1X, lineSegmentPoint1Y), 
                                              new MyVector(lineSegmentPoint2X, lineSegmentPoint2Y));
         Debug.Assert(d1 == expectedAnswer);

         /*
         // Katz using squared distance
         double d2 = DistanceFromPointToLineSegmentSquared(new MyVector(aPointX, aPointY), 
                                              new MyVector(lineSegmentPoint1X, lineSegmentPoint1Y), 
                                              new MyVector(lineSegmentPoint2X, lineSegmentPoint2Y));
         Debug.Assert(Math.Abs(d2 - expectedAnswer * expectedAnswer) < 1E-7f);
          */

         /*
         // Matti (optimized)
         double d3 = FloatVector.DistanceToLineSegment(new PointF(aPointX, aPointY), 
                                                new PointF(lineSegmentPoint1X, lineSegmentPoint1Y), 
                                                new PointF(lineSegmentPoint2X, lineSegmentPoint2Y));
         Debug.Assert(Math.Abs(d3 - expectedAnswer) < 1E-7f);
          */
      }

      private static double DistanceFromPointToLineSegment(MyVector aPoint, 
                                             MyVector lineSegmentPoint1, MyVector lineSegmentPoint2)
      {
         MyVector closestPoint;  // Not used
         return aPoint.DistanceToLineSegment(lineSegmentPoint1, lineSegmentPoint2, 
                                             out closestPoint);
      }

      private static double DistanceFromPointToLineSegmentSquared(MyVector aPoint, 
                                             MyVector lineSegmentPoint1, MyVector lineSegmentPoint2)
      {
         MyVector closestPoint;  // Not used
         return aPoint.DistanceToLineSegmentSquared(lineSegmentPoint1, lineSegmentPoint2, 
                                                    out closestPoint);
      }
   }

As you can see, I tried to measure the difference between using the version that avoids the Sqrt() method and the normal version. My tests indicate you can maybe save about 2.5%, but I'm not even sure of that - the variations within the various test runs were of the same order of magnitude. I also tried measuring the version posted by Matti (plus an obvious optimization), and that version seems to be about 4% slower than the version based on Katz/Grumdrig code.

Edit: Incidentally, I've also tried measuring a method that finds the distance to an infinite line (not a line segment) using a cross product (and a Sqrt()), and it's about 32% faster.

share|improve this answer

One line solution using arctangents:

The idea is to move A to (0, 0) and rotate triangle clockwise to make C lay on X axis, when this happen, By will be the distance.

  1. a angle = Atan(Cy - Ay, Cx - Ax);
  2. b angle = Atan(By - Ay, Bx - Ax);
  3. AB length = Sqrt( (Bx - Ax)^2 + (By - Ay)^2 )
  4. By = Sin ( bAngle - aAngle) * ABLength

C#

public double Distance(Point a, Point b, Point c)
{
    // normalize points
    Point cn = new Point(c.X - a.X, c.Y - a.Y);
    Point bn = new Point(b.X - a.X, b.Y - a.Y);

    double angle = Math.Atan2(bn.Y, bn.X) - Math.Atan2(cn.Y, cn.X);
    double abLength = Math.Sqrt(bn.X*bn.X + bn.Y*bn.Y);

    return Math.Sin(angle)*abLength;
}

One line C# (to be converted to SQL)

double distance = Math.Sin(Math.Atan2(b.Y - a.Y, b.X - a.X) - Math.Atan2(c.Y - a.Y, c.X - a.X)) * Math.Sqrt((b.X - a.X) * (b.X - a.X) + (b.Y - a.Y) * (b.Y - a.Y))
share|improve this answer

Here is a page that goes over a construction for the distance between two lines. Along the way he works out the distance between a point and a line.

share|improve this answer

Here's the code I ended up writing. This code assumes that a point is defined in the form of {x:5, y:7}. Note that this is not the absolute most efficient way, but it's the simplest and easiest-to-understand code that I could come up with.

// a, b, and c in the code below are all points

function distance(a, b)
{
    var dx = a.x - b.x;
    var dy = a.y - b.y;
    return Math.sqrt(dx*dx + dy*dy);
}

function Segment(a, b)
{
    var ab = {
        x: b.x - a.x,
        y: b.y - a.y
    };
    var length = distance(a, b);

    function cross(c) {
        return ab.x * (c.y-a.y) - ab.y * (c.x-a.x);
    };

    this.distanceFrom = function(c) {
        return Math.min(distance(a,c),
                        distance(b,c),
                        Math.abs(cross(c) / length));
    };
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This code has a bug. A point near the line on which the segment lies, but far off one end of the segment, would be incorrectly judged to be near the segment. –  Grumdrig Oct 22 '09 at 17:02

see the Matlab GEOMETRY toolbox in the following website: http://people.sc.fsu.edu/~jburkardt/m_src/geometry/geometry.html

ctrl+f and type "segment" to find line segment related functions. the functions "segment_point_dist_2d.m" and "segment_point_dist_3d.m" are what you need.

The GEOMETRY codes are available in a C version and a C++ version and a FORTRAN77 version and a FORTRAN90 version and a MATLAB version.

share|improve this answer

Here is same thing as the C++ answer but ported to pascal. The order of the point parameter has changed to suit my code but is the same thing.

function Dot(const p1, p2: PointF): double;
begin
  Result := p1.x * p2.x + p1.y * p2.y;
end;
function SubPoint(const p1, p2: PointF): PointF;
begin
  result.x := p1.x - p2.x;
  result.y := p1.y - p2.y;
end;

function ShortestDistance2(const p,v,w : PointF) : double;
var
  l2,t : double;
  projection,tt: PointF;
begin
  // Return minimum distance between line segment vw and point p
  //l2 := length_squared(v, w);  // i.e. |w-v|^2 -  avoid a sqrt
  l2 := Distance(v,w);
  l2 := MPower(l2,2);
  if (l2 = 0.0) then begin
    result:= Distance(p, v);   // v == w case
    exit;
  end;
  // Consider the line extending the segment, parameterized as v + t (w - v).
  // We find projection of point p onto the line.
  // It falls where t = [(p-v) . (w-v)] / |w-v|^2
  t := Dot(SubPoint(p,v),SubPoint(w,v)) / l2;
  if (t < 0.0) then begin
    result := Distance(p, v);       // Beyond the 'v' end of the segment
    exit;
  end
  else if (t > 1.0) then begin
    result := Distance(p, w);  // Beyond the 'w' end of the segment
    exit;
  end;
  //projection := v + t * (w - v);  // Projection falls on the segment
  tt.x := v.x + t * (w.x - v.x);
  tt.y := v.y + t * (w.y - v.y);
  result := Distance(p, tt);
end;
share|improve this answer

AutoHotkeys version based on Joshua's Javascript:

plDist(x, y, x1, y1, x2, y2) {
    A:= x - x1
    B:= y - y1
    C:= x2 - x1
    D:= y2 - y1

    dot:= A*C + B*D
    sqLen:= C*C + D*D
    param:= dot / sqLen

    if (param < 0 || ((x1 = x2) && (y1 = y2))) {
        xx:= x1
        yy:= y1
    } else if (param > 1) {
        xx:= x2
        yy:= y2
    } else {
        xx:= x1 + param*C
        yy:= y1 + param*D
    }

    dx:= x - xx
    dy:= y - yy

    return sqrt(dx*dx + dy*dy)
}
share|improve this answer

Here is devnullicus's C++ version converted to C#. For my implementation I needed to know the point of intersection and found his solution to work well.

public static bool PointSegmentDistanceSquared(PointF point, PointF lineStart, PointF lineEnd, out double distance, out PointF intersectPoint)
{
    const double kMinSegmentLenSquared = 0.00000001; // adjust to suit.  If you use float, you'll probably want something like 0.000001f
    const double kEpsilon = 1.0E-14; // adjust to suit.  If you use floats, you'll probably want something like 1E-7f
    double dX = lineEnd.X - lineStart.X;
    double dY = lineEnd.Y - lineStart.Y;
    double dp1X = point.X - lineStart.X;
    double dp1Y = point.Y - lineStart.Y;
    double segLenSquared = (dX * dX) + (dY * dY);
    double t = 0.0;

    if (segLenSquared >= -kMinSegmentLenSquared && segLenSquared <= kMinSegmentLenSquared)
    {
        // segment is a point.
        intersectPoint = lineStart;
        t = 0.0;
        distance = ((dp1X * dp1X) + (dp1Y * dp1Y));
    }
    else
    {
        // Project a line from p to the segment [p1,p2].  By considering the line
        // extending the segment, parameterized as p1 + (t * (p2 - p1)),
        // we find projection of point p onto the line. 
        // It falls where t = [(p - p1) . (p2 - p1)] / |p2 - p1|^2
        t = ((dp1X * dX) + (dp1Y * dY)) / segLenSquared;
        if (t < kEpsilon)
        {
            // intersects at or to the "left" of first segment vertex (lineStart.X, lineStart.Y).  If t is approximately 0.0, then
            // intersection is at p1.  If t is less than that, then there is no intersection (i.e. p is not within
            // the 'bounds' of the segment)
            if (t > -kEpsilon)
            {
                // intersects at 1st segment vertex
                t = 0.0;
            }
            // set our 'intersection' point to p1.
            intersectPoint = lineStart;
            // Note: If you wanted the ACTUAL intersection point of where the projected lines would intersect if
            // we were doing PointLineDistanceSquared, then intersectPoint.X would be (lineStart.X + (t * dx)) and intersectPoint.Y would be (lineStart.Y + (t * dy)).
        }
        else if (t > (1.0 - kEpsilon))
        {
            // intersects at or to the "right" of second segment vertex (lineEnd.X, lineEnd.Y).  If t is approximately 1.0, then
            // intersection is at p2.  If t is greater than that, then there is no intersection (i.e. p is not within
            // the 'bounds' of the segment)
            if (t < (1.0 + kEpsilon))
            {
                // intersects at 2nd segment vertex
                t = 1.0;
            }
            // set our 'intersection' point to p2.
            intersectPoint = lineEnd;
            // Note: If you wanted the ACTUAL intersection point of where the projected lines would intersect if
            // we were doing PointLineDistanceSquared, then intersectPoint.X would be (lineStart.X + (t * dx)) and intersectPoint.Y would be (lineStart.Y + (t * dy)).
        }
        else
        {
            // The projection of the point to the point on the segment that is perpendicular succeeded and the point
            // is 'within' the bounds of the segment.  Set the intersection point as that projected point.
            intersectPoint = new PointF((float)(lineStart.X + (t * dX)), (float)(lineStart.Y + (t * dY)));
        }
        // return the squared distance from p to the intersection point.  Note that we return the squared distance
        // as an optimization because many times you just need to compare relative distances and the squared values
        // works fine for that.  If you want the ACTUAL distance, just take the square root of this value.
        double dpqX = point.X - intersectPoint.X;
        double dpqY = point.Y - intersectPoint.Y;

        distance = ((dpqX * dpqX) + (dpqY * dpqY));
    }

    return true;
}
share|improve this answer

A little cleaner solution in JavaScript based on this formula: enter image description here

distToSegment: function (point, linePointA, linePointB){

    var x0 = point.X;
    var y0 = point.Y;

    var x1 = linePointA.X;
    var y1 = linePointA.Y;

    var x2 = linePointB.X;
    var y2 = linePointB.Y;

    var Dx = (x2 - x1);
    var Dy = (y2 - y1);

    var numerator = Math.abs(Dy*x0 - Dx*y0 - x1*y2 + x2*y1);
    var denominator = Math.sqrt(Dx*Dx + Dy*Dy);
    if (denominator == 0) {
        return this.dist2(point, linePointA);
    }

    return numerator/denominator;

}
share|improve this answer
2  
Kudos for actually writing a formula down. However, this is the formula to calculate the distance to a line, not to a line segment. Picking (x0,y0)=(-10,0), (x1,y1)=(0,0), and (x2,y2)=(10,0) gives a distance of 0, while it should have been 10. –  Anne van Rossum Oct 7 at 7:56

Grumdrig's C++/JavaScript implementation was very useful to me, so I have provided a Python direct port that I am using. The complete code is here: https://gist.github.com/irees/be5e56e7c9b16d78a351

class Point(object):
  def __init__(self, x, y):
    self.x = float(x)
    self.y = float(y)

def square(x):
  return x * x

def distance_squared(v, w):
  return square(v.x - w.x) + square(v.y - w.y)

def distance_point_segment_squared(p, v, w):
  # Segment length squared, |w-v|^2
  d2 = distance_squared(v, w) 
  if d2 == 0: 
    # v == w, return distance to v
    return distance_squared(p, v)
  # Consider the line extending the segment, parameterized as v + t (w - v).
  # We find projection of point p onto the line.
  # It falls where t = [(p-v) . (w-v)] / |w-v|^2
  t = ((p.x - v.x) * (w.x - v.x) + (p.y - v.y) * (w.y - v.y)) / d2;
  if t < 0:
    # Beyond v end of the segment
    return distance_squared(p, v)
  elif t > 1.0:
    # Beyond w end of the segment
    return distance_squared(p, w)
  else:
    # Projection falls on the segment.
    proj = Point(v.x + t * (w.x - v.x), v.y + t * (w.y - v.y))
    # print proj.x, proj.y
    return distance_squared(p, proj)
share|improve this answer

The above function is not working on vertical lines. Here is a function that is working fine! Line with points p1, p2. and CheckPoint is p;

public float DistanceOfPointToLine2(PointF p1, PointF p2, PointF p)
{
  //          (y1-y2)x + (x2-x1)y + (x1y2-x2y1)
  //d(P,L) = --------------------------------
  //         sqrt( (x2-x1)pow2 + (y2-y1)pow2 )

  double ch = (p1.Y - p2.Y) * p.X + (p2.X - p1.X) * p.Y + (p1.X * p2.Y - p2.X * p1.Y);
  double del = Math.Sqrt(Math.Pow(p2.X - p1.X, 2) + Math.Pow(p2.Y - p1.Y, 2));
  double d = ch / del;
  return (float)d;
}
share|improve this answer
%Matlab solution by Tim from Cody
function ans=distP2S(x0,y0,x1,y1,x2,y2)
% Point is x0,y0
z=complex(x0-x1,y0-y1);
complex(x2-x1,y2-y1);
abs(z-ans*min(1,max(0,real(z/ans))));
share|improve this answer

Matlab direct Grumdrig implementation

function ans=distP2S(px,py,vx,vy,wx,wy)
% [px py vx vy wx wy]
  t=( (px-vx)*(wx-vx)+(py-vy)*(wy-vy) )/idist(vx,wx,vy,wy)^2;
  [idist(px,vx,py,vy) idist(px,vx+t*(wx-vx),py,vy+t*(wy-vy)) idist(px,wx,py,wy) ];
  ans(1+(t>0)+(t>1)); % <0 0<=t<=1 t>1     
 end

function d=idist(a,b,c,d)
 d=abs(a-b+1i*(c-d));
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.