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I am trying to create a walker that goes through directories. Here are the inputs and outputs which I have partly working. I am using a test directory but I would like this to be done on any directory which is leading to some problems.

[IN]: print testdir  #name of the directory
[OUT]: ['j','k','l']  #directories under testdir

[IN]: print testdir.j
[OUT]: ['m','n']  # Files under testdir.j

Here is the code so far:

class directory_lister:
    """Lists directories under root"""
    def __init__(self,path):
        self.path = path
        self.ex = []
        for item in os.listdir(path):
            self.ex.append(item)
    def __repr__(self):
        return repr(self.ex)

This returns the directories and files but I have to manually assign the names of the directories.

testdir = directory_lister(path/to/testdir)
j = directory_lister(path/to/j)
etc

Is there a way to automate instances such that:

for root,dirs,files in os.walk(/path/to/testdir/):
    for x in dirs:
        x = directory_lister(root) #I want j = directory_lister(path/to/j), k = directory_lister(path/to/k) and l = directory_lister(path/to/l) here.

Can there be a:

class directory_lister:
    def __init__(self,path):
        self.path = path
        self.j = directory_lister(path + os.sep + j) # how to automate this attribute of the class when assigned to an instance??

The code above is wrong as the object x only becomes an instance but j,k,l have to be defined manually. Do I have to use another class or a dictionary with getattr but I always run into the same problem. If any extra information is required please ask, I hope I made this clear.

UPDATE 2

Is there a way to add other complex functions to the DirLister by Anurag below? So when it gets to a file say testdir/j/p, it prints out the first line of file p.

[IN] print testdir.j.p
[OUT] First Line of p

I have made a class for printing out the first line of the file:

class File:
    def __init__(self, path):
        """Read the first line in desired path"""
        self.path = path
        f = open(path, 'r')
        self.first_line = f.readline()
        f.close()

    def __repr__(self):
        """Display the first line"""
        return self.first_line

Just need to know how to incorporate it in the class below. Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is the desired interface and functionality of directory_lister? –  Karl Knechtel Dec 13 '11 at 17:49
    
os.walk already lists all the directories and files, so what is the point of directory_lister? –  ekhumoro Dec 13 '11 at 18:04
    
@KarlKnechtel, the functionality is for conveniently listing the directories under a root directory. So you just specify the root directory then the rest becomes very easy to view. –  Jimmy Dec 14 '11 at 9:22
    
That isn't even close to answering the question. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 14 '11 at 15:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I assume you want sub-dir to be accessible like a attribute, you can achieve that two ways

  • Go thru list of files and create variables dynamically
  • Hook into attribute access and correctly return listers as needed

I prefer second approach as it is lazy, better and easier to implement

import os

class DirLister(object):
    def __init__(self, root):
        self.root = root
        self._list = None

    def __getattr__(self, name):
        try:
            var = super(DirLister).__getattr__(self, name)
            return var
        except AttributeError:
            return DirLister(os.path.join(self.root, name))

    def __str__(self):
        self._load()
        return str(self._list)

    def _load(self):
        """
        load once when needed
        """
        if self._list is not None:
            return
        self._list = os.listdir(self.root) # list root someway

root = DirLister("/")
print root.etc.apache2

output:

['mods-enabled', 'sites-80', 'mods-available', 'ports.conf', 'envvars', 'httpd.conf', 'sites-available', 'conf.d', 'magic', 'apache2.conf', 'sites-enabled']

You can improve this to have better error checking etc

Code explanation: this is basically a recursive listing of directory, so a DirLister objects lists files under the given root and if some variable is accessed with dotted notation it returns a DirLister assuming that that attribute is a folder under the root. So if we try to create DirLister class step by step it will be more clear

1- A simple DirLister which just lists files/folders under it

class DirLister(object):
    def __init__(self, root):
        self.root = root
        self._list = os.listdir(self.root)

2- Our simple lister just list files one level deep, if we want to get filers under subfolders we can hook into __getattr__ which is called with varname when obj.varname is used. So if our dir-lister doesn't have a attribute named varname we assume user is trying to access that directory under given root, so we create another DirLister whose root is root+subdirname

def __getattr__(self, name):
    try:
        var = super(DirLister).__getattr__(self, name)
        return var
    except AttributeError:
        return DirLister(os.path.join(self.root, name))

Note: first we check base class for that attribute because we don't want to treat all variable access as sub-dir access, if there is no such attribute hence AttributeError then we create a new DirLister for sub-folder.

3- To improve code so that we don't list all folders even if user did not ask for them, we only list when user requires, hence a load method

def _load(self):
    if self._list is not None:
        return
    self._list = os.listdir(self.root) # list root someway

so this method lists dir if not already listed, and this should be called when we finally need it e.g. while printing the list

Edit: as asked by OP here is the alternate method of recursively list whole tree though I would strongly recommend against it

import os

class RecursiveDirLister(object):
    def __init__(self, root):
        self._sublist = []
        for folder in os.listdir(root):
            self._sublist.append(folder)
            path = os.path.join(root, folder)
            if not os.path.isdir(path):
                continue
            # add it as attribute, assuming that dir-name is valid python varname
            try:
                sublister = RecursiveDirLister(path)
            except OSError:
                continue#ignore permission errors etc
            setattr(self, folder, sublister)

    def __str__(self):
        return str(self._sublist)

etc = RecursiveDirLister("/etc")
print etc.fonts

output:

['conf.avail', 'conf.d', 'fonts.conf', 'fonts.dtd']
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. The underlying assumption of using directory names as attributes falls down when you have a period in a directory name though (as I noticed when testing this out). –  Gordon Broom Dec 13 '11 at 17:51
    
Thank you! This does the job very well, I am beginner would you mind just talking me through the code to better understand it? –  Jimmy Dec 13 '11 at 17:58
    
@Jimmy I have tried to explain, see if it is helpful –  Anurag Uniyal Dec 13 '11 at 18:19
    
@GordonBroom not even dot, anything thing which is allowed in filenames but is not a valid python variable name will give error –  Anurag Uniyal Dec 13 '11 at 18:20
    
Thank you for explaining was very helpful. Is it possible to make it more complex by printing the first line of a file. So testdir/j/n would return, print testdir.j.n, 'First line of n'? Would that require the use of the first way (the non-lazy one)? Also how to make the class iterable? –  Jimmy Dec 13 '11 at 20:40

Not sure what you're asking, but would this work?

for root,dirs,files in os.walk(/path/to/testdir/):
    listers = dict((dir, directory_lister(dir)) for dir in dirs)
    #now you can use:
    listers['j']
    listers['k']
    listers['l']
share|improve this answer
    
When I run this I get: OSError: [Errno 2] No such file or directory: 'l' –  Jimmy Dec 13 '11 at 17:22
    
ah change it to directory_lister(os.path.join(root, dir)) instead of directory_lister(dir) –  Claudiu Dec 13 '11 at 17:36
    
When I run this it returns a blank listers dictionary –  Jimmy Dec 13 '11 at 17:44

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