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Essentially what I want is a table, with one row, 5 cells... The first / left cell should be left justfied, the last / right cell should be right justified, and the middle 3 cells need to be centered with equal amounts of spacing between each cell. The table itself is "100% width, so that is where the spacing between cells would come from.

How would I write this (using html / css)? "table" tags or "divs" etc are both valid, I don't really mind which approach is taken as long as the end result looks correct.

Edit: The problem is the spacing; the table itself isn't an issue, but simply setting the alignment on the cells will not work correctly; the free space between the cells is not 100% divided equally between the cells.

I also don't want to specify cell width as the content is dynamic and there is no way to know before hand how much width is needed.

share|improve this question
1  
Instead of asking how to write it, hack out an attempt, post it, and ask what you did wrong or what the problem is – adam Dec 13 '11 at 17:51
    
As Adam says, its helpful to narrow down where you need the help. You can probably create an HTML table. Quite possibly you can align text. Is the spacign the problem (I can imagine just left, right and center align might leave more space on the edges than in the center)? Narrow it down a bit for us... – Chris Dec 13 '11 at 17:54
    
Did you see my answer below setting the width using percentages? This distributes the width evenly between the 5 cells... is this not what you require? – FluffyKitten Dec 13 '11 at 18:06
up vote 2 down vote accepted

HTML only version

<table>
<tr>
   <td width="20%"></td>
   <td width="20%" align="center"></td>
   <td width="20%" align="center"></td>
   <td width="20%" align="center"></td>
   <td width="20%" align="right"></td>
</tr>
</table>

CSS Version

<table>
<tr>
   <td style="width:20%;"></td>
   <td style="width:20%; text-align:center"></td>
   <td style="width:20%; text-align:center"></td>
   <td style="width:20%; text-align:center"></td>
   <td style="width:20%; text-align:right"></td>
</tr>
</table>
share|improve this answer
    
These solution is technically correct, but it is always recommended to keep your styles separate from your HTML, preferably in a stylesheet but alternatively in the <head> – FluffyKitten Dec 13 '11 at 18:03
    
I thought I had tried this, but must have had something wrong in my CSS... it is working now, thanks! – user85116 Dec 13 '11 at 18:09
    
But PLEASE reconsider inline styling! Its very bad practice! My answer below shows how to achieve the same thing using separate styles. Also, you will need to use table-layout:fixed; to ensure certain browsers won't resize your cells anyway if there is more content in some cells. – FluffyKitten Dec 13 '11 at 18:13
    
@FluffyKitten stop flooding every comments, Stack Overflow is not about gaining reputation but helping other people. Your solution is really good, I agree. – Jivago Dec 13 '11 at 18:17
    
But I am only trying to help @Jivago! The OP has already accepted your solution so I'm not looking for reputation (as comments don't count), but they really shouldn't use inline styling as it is very bad practice. I don't know which comments the OP or others will read, so I'm commenting on any of the posts where it is relevant becuase it is a very important point that will help them in future. – FluffyKitten Dec 13 '11 at 18:19

If you are using a table, assign unique ids to each cell and then use css to justify as required, e.g.

HTML:

<td id="firstcell">...</td>
<td id="secondcell">...</td>
<td id="thirdcell">...</td>
<td id="fourthcell">...</td>
<td id="fifthcell">...</td>

CSS:

table {table-layout:fixed;}  /* ensure the widths are absolutely fixed at the specified width*/
td{ width: 20%;}  /* allocate space evenly between all 5 cells */
td#firstcell {text-align:left;}
td#secondcell, td#thirdcell, td#fourthcell {text-align:center;}
td#fifthcell {text-align:right;}
share|improve this answer
td
{
    text-align:center;

}
td:first-child
{
    text-align:left;   
}

td:last-child
{
    text-align:right;
}
share|improve this answer
<style type="text/css">
.five_columns {
    width: 100%;
}
.five_columns > div {
    width: 20%;
    float: left;
    text-align: center;
    overflow: auto;
}
.five_columns > div:first-child {
    text-align: left;
}
.five_columns > div:last-child {
    text-align: right;
}
</style>
<div class="five_columns">
    <div>...</div>
    <div>...</div>
    <div>...</div>
    <div>...</div>
    <div>...</div>
</div>

overflow: auto is set because if you strictly want the width to be the same there really isn't much you can do (as far as I know) other than force scrollbars on anything that's too long.

share|improve this answer
    
I just tested it out as I'm not familiar with table-layout, but the result was if a long enough unbroken string was put in one cell it overflowed behind the next column, almost like overflow: hidden. That's just weird IMHO. – potNPan Dec 13 '11 at 18:26
    
aaaaaand @FluffyKitten goes and delete his comment so now it looks like I'm talking to myself... – potNPan Dec 13 '11 at 18:33
    
sorry! I thought your comment was for the OP. I deleted my comment because I'd commented on your post by mistake, I thought I was following up on my comment to someone else and I just replied to the post under mine without checking... but they'd deleted their post in the meantime and replied to you instead (they suggested not defining the width at all would ensure an equal distribution!!) Didn't mean to make you look lonely there :-) – FluffyKitten Dec 13 '11 at 23:09

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