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I'm attempting to write a method that will read a properties file using Class.getResource(), make changes to its values, and save the file.

public void saveDBConnectionValues(String user, String password, String host, int port) throws IOException, URISyntaxException
{
    Properties dbProperties = new Properties();

    File f = new File(this.getClass().getResource("db.properties").toURI());

    BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream(f))));     

    dbProperties.load(reader);

    reader.close();

    dbProperties.setProperty("user", user);
    dbProperties.setProperty("pw", password);
    dbProperties.setProperty("host", host);
    dbProperties.setProperty("port", Integer.toString(port));

    BufferedWriter writer = new BufferedWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(new FileOutputStream(f)))

    dbProperties.store(writer, null);

    writer.close();

}

My db.properties file is read correctly, but the store method doesn't seem to be working here. Can someone explain why this doesn't work, and what I need to do to get it working?

Thanks

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Have you tried explicitely closing the reading chain (BufferedReader and al.) before attempting to write in the same file ? –  Olivier Croisier Dec 13 '11 at 18:21
    
Yes, I did. Didn't make a difference. –  bibs Dec 13 '11 at 18:23
    
If this code lives in a webapp, maybe you simply don't have the permissions to write in this particular directory (especially if it's in the webapp structure itself). Can you try with some hard-coded path outside the webapp ? –  Olivier Croisier Dec 13 '11 at 18:26
    
In reference to the code above, a call to f.canWrite() produces true –  bibs Dec 13 '11 at 18:32
    
That's a point. How are you testing your code? In the IDE, by exporting to a JAR, or by putting it online in the form of an applet, etc? –  Andy Dec 13 '11 at 18:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A resource and a file are two different things. A resource is loaded from the class loader, and is found in the classpath. It could be loaded from the file system, or from a jar, or from a socket (or from any other location, depending on the class loader). Writing to a resource doesn't make sense.

If you want to read and write from/to a file, don't use a resource. Use file streams or reader/writer.

share|improve this answer
    
I use getResource() to get the URL so that I can create a File for reading/writing. Is this not good enough? Why? –  bibs Dec 13 '11 at 18:30
    
Because as soon as you package the classes in a jar, the code will break. If you want to use the file system, use the File IO classes. –  JB Nizet Dec 13 '11 at 18:32

I tried your snippet locally and it works. Only consideration is since the resource loaded is the .class file you should look there for the properties file and not where the .java file is located.

To find out the path you could do this

final FileOutputStream outStream = new FileOutputStream(f);
System.out.println(f.getAbsolutePath()); // <-- add this line
share|improve this answer

Are you trying this code when it has been exported to a Jar? Because if you are, a JAR is a form of an archive and therefore the contents can not be amended easily. Basically, you will be able to read files in the JAR, but not write.

Therefore, even if the code is not in the form of a JAR currently, you shouldn't really be trying to do what you are doing. Unfortunately, it is impossible anyway - as I found out after countless attempts myself!

However, it would be nice to hear what exactly the error is. For example, have you caught any exceptions?

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