Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

what i need to do is something like this:

procedure A(type_of_form);
var form: TForm;
begin
  form := type_of_form.Create(application);
  form.showmodal;
  freeandnil(form);
end;

I did this for every dynamically created form:

form1 := TForm1.Create(application);
form1.showmodal;
freeandnil(form1);

What i will do inside procedure A is more complex, but the problem resides in how to make the creation of the form somewhat general. Perhaps something with @ operator... i really do not know.

Thanks for any suggestion!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted
procedure Test(AMyFormClass: TFormClass);
var
 form: TForm;
begin
  form := AMyFormClass.Create(Application); // you can use nil if you Free it in here
  try
    form.ShowModal;
  finally
    form.Release; // generally better than Free for a Form
  end;
end;

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Test(TForm2);
end;
share|improve this answer
    
form.Free is just fine there. It's worth pointing out that this only works if the form's constructor is an override of the TForm constructor. –  David Heffernan Dec 13 '11 at 20:54
    
@David, are you saying that this won't work if the constructor is named Create, with matching parameters, if it hides the descendant constructor? –  Marcus Adams Dec 13 '11 at 21:05
2  
@Marcus That's correct. You need to use virtual constructors to get instantiation via class reference to work. Otherwise you end up with a TMyForm every time, irrespective of what is in the class reference. –  David Heffernan Dec 13 '11 at 21:09
    
The problem with the code (perhaps in my question) is that is not general. Only forms of TMyForm can be passed as parameters. The idea is to call the function with a "lot" of forms that needs to be created, used and disposed in the same way. Every form, dispite they inherit everything from TForm, has its own class. –  Speaker Dec 13 '11 at 21:47
1  
@user the code in this answer does what you need and is general. If it doesn't solve your problem then you've not yet asked the right question. You can do Test(TMySuperDuperClass) or Test(MyOtherFantasticForm) so long as they all share a common ancestor. –  David Heffernan Dec 13 '11 at 21:49

What you are asking for is basically what TApplication.CreateForm() does, eg:

Application.CreateForm(TForm1, form1); 
form1.ShowModal; 
FreeAndNil(form1); 

You can mimic that without calling TAppliction.CreateForm() like this:

procedure A(AClassType: TFormClass); 
var
  form: TForm; 
begin 
  form := AClassType.Create(Application); 
  try
    form.ShowModal; 
  finally
    FreeAndNil(form);
  end; 
end; 

...

begin
  A(TForm1); 
end;
share|improve this answer
    
Yes... the code is similar to the other (and similar to CreateForm method)... jeje... i never realice that! –  Speaker Dec 13 '11 at 23:15
    
Just another question... which is the best way for freeing forms? Form.release? or FreeAndNil(Form) I ever use FreeAndNil... but... –  Speaker Dec 13 '11 at 23:17
2  
TForm.Release() is meant to be used only when the form needs to free itself from inside of one of its event handlers. The free is delayed until control returns to the main message loop to ensure that the TForm is not being used by anything. If you know that the TForm is not being used anymore (which is the case in this situation), then you can call Free() immediately. FreeAndNil() is overkill for such simple usage of a local variable like this example. There is no need to nil a pointer that is not going to be used anymore. –  Remy Lebeau Dec 13 '11 at 23:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.