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Suppose I have following inheritance tree:

SDLBullet inherits from Bullet inherits from Entity
EnemyBullet inherits form Bullet inherits from Entity

Now I need a new class, SDLEnemyBullet, which needs the draw as implemented in SDLBullet, and the collision as implemented in EnemyBullet. How would I do this? Is this to be solved using multiple inheritance? If not, feel free to edit my question and title. If so, how would I implement such thing?

Some code examples below:

class Entity {
  bool collision(Entity) = 0;
  void draw() = 0;
}

class Bullet : Entity {
  bool collision(Entity) {/*some implementation*/};
  void draw() {/*draw me*/};
}

class SDLBullet : Bullet {
  void draw() {/*draw me using SDL*/};
}

class EnemyBullet : Bullet {
  bool collision(Entity) {/*if Entity is a fellow enemy, don't collide*/};
}

class SDLEnemyBullet : ????? {
  /*I need SDLBullet::draw() here*/
  /*I need EnemyBullet::collision(Entity) here*/
  /*I certainly do not want EnemyBullet::draw nor SDLBullet::collision here*/
}

Any help is much appreciated!

(BTW: This is a school project, and an inheritance tree like this was suggested to us. No one is stopping us from doing it different and better. Thats why I asked the question.)

share|improve this question
    
What specific distinction is there for EnemyBullet over Bullet? Is there more to the implementation than just the collision detection? Because if so you could remove the class and just have a check on the Bullet to determine the source (enemy or not) and ignore certain checks, that way you're not duplicating every subclass of Bullet for enemies. –  TheCapn Dec 13 '11 at 20:50
    
If you're just looking for the syntax, it's class SDLEnemyBullet : SDLBullet, EnemyBullet { /* ... */ };, or perhaps adorned with access specifiers ("public"). Don't do this, though, as it'll create two copies of the Bullet subobject. –  Kerrek SB Dec 13 '11 at 20:52
    
I'd like bullet to collide with everything as opposed to an enemy bullet which collides with everything but Enemies. I was planning on making a PlayerBullet as well. I don't know if I'll still need the normal Bullet but I was planning on keeping it for flexibility, I might just need it some day. (Also, for now everything is a normal SDLBullet, so if a Player catches up with his bullet, he dies, if an enemy collides with another enemy bullet , it dies. It's the latter that bothers me most.) –  Mats Dec 13 '11 at 20:55
    
Adding virtual won't create 2 copies of the base class : class SDLEnemyBullet : public virtual SDLBullet, public virtual EnemyBullet –  Dinaiz Dec 13 '11 at 20:56
    
Step 1: remove every instance of inheritance from your code. Step 2: use other means to reuse functionality between classes. Step 3: re-introduce inheritance in the very few cases where you actually need polymorphic behavior. Step 4: .... Step 5: PROFIT!!! –  jalf Dec 13 '11 at 20:58
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The textbook solution involves multiple and virtual inheritance.

class SDLBullet : public virtual Bullet {
  void draw() {/*draw me using SDL*/};
};

class EnemyBullet : public virtual Bullet {
  bool collision(Entity) {/*if Entity is a fellow enemy, don't collide*/};
};

class SDLEnemyBullet : public SDLBullet, public EnemyBullet {
  // just one Bullet subobject here
};
share|improve this answer
    
If I implement it this way, SDLBullet and EnemyBullet won't be usable as standalone classes anymore, won't they become abstract? SDLBullet needs a collision method of it's own, since it too is an Entity that might appear in game. (EDIT: I see now, SDLBullet still has the implementation of Entity. Can I still declare Entity* e = new SDLBullet;?) –  Mats Dec 13 '11 at 20:57
    
I only added virtual (and public). This does not change concrete class into abstract or vice versa, so if you could declare a SDLBullet before, you will still be able to do so. I also suggest reading on virtual inheritance; a Wikipedia article would be a good start. –  n.m. Dec 13 '11 at 21:32
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Normally, collision stuff is done using multiple dispatch, or in C++, who hasn't this feature, using the visitor pattern.

BUT

why don't you have a hierarchy like this instead ?

class Entity;

class Bullet : public Entity
{
public:
 virtual draw();
}

class FriendlyBullet : public Bullet
{
public: 
bool collide(EnnemyBullet*);
bool collide(FriendlyBullet*);
}
class EnnemyBullet : public Bullet
{
public:
 bool collide(EnnemyBullet*);
bool collide(FriendlyBullet*);
}

This would work too, and wouldn't require multidispatch or multiple inheritance

share|improve this answer
    
Visitor pattern, I'll look that up! (Although that's not a real answer to my question, it could have been another method.) –  Mats Dec 13 '11 at 20:50
    
Sorry, I posted too quickly. Added some stuff which better answers your question ...I think ;) –  Dinaiz Dec 13 '11 at 20:55
    
I really need the polymorphism, which I don't have with your code.. –  Mats Dec 13 '11 at 21:00
    
Visitor pattern actually looks very promising and sums up about all the answers given here. –  Mats Dec 13 '11 at 21:47
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You need to specify a comma separated list of the super classes:

class SDLEnemyBullet : public SDLBullet, public EnemyBullet {
  /*I need SDLBullet::draw() here*/
  /*I need EnemyBullet::collision(Entity) here*/
  /*I certainly do not want EnemyBullet::draw nor SDLBullet::collision here*/
}

It looks like you're making a game (engine). To avoid the need for complex inheritance structures like this favor composition over inheritance for entities i.e. Have an entity object that contains separate 'component' objects for rendering etc. That way you can mix and match the components however you like without having an explosion of classes with all the different combinations of super classes.

Here's a good article on the subject: http://cowboyprogramming.com/2007/01/05/evolve-your-heirachy/

share|improve this answer
    
The linking different components would be done using multiple inheritance? –  Mats Dec 13 '11 at 21:01
    
Nope, it removes the need for multiple inheritance. In your situation I would not recommend using multiple inheritance. –  Gary Buyn Dec 13 '11 at 21:05
    
I'll look further into composition as well, thanks for the tip. –  Mats Dec 13 '11 at 21:06
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Prefer composition over inheritance

You don't need inheritance to combine stuff that's not related like that. Make up basic objects (entities?) for game logic, physics, sound, input, graphics (which may use inheritance) and combine those a GameObject which just has an array of said objects.

Some nifty cross-linking is useful since they will all share a Frame or Transform, but that can be done during creation by iterating over all other objects and using dynamic_cast... (it's useful if you do not need to depend on initialization order).

But there's really no need to build this with inheritance. It doesn't fit your usecase properly. (Although virtual inheritance is useful, it's not a good thing to use inheritance to force different things to become the same, i.e. making everything be a something, instead of being made up of different parts (render, damage, sound, etc...).

Read this and this for more info, or just click the title to google for it. :)

share|improve this answer
    
I'll look further into this, but the inheritance way is the way it was suggested to us (this is a school project). No one is stopping us from doing it in another way, perhaps better way. That's why I asked the question. –  Mats Dec 13 '11 at 21:08
    
@Mats: Ok. For school, it's fine to try out doing it that way. But all serious/modern game engines that I've seen and worked with do try to avoid inheritance, as it makes it posssible to combine different aspects of things quite easy. I recommend you try to hack together a small composition based framework, just to learn how that works. –  Macke Dec 13 '11 at 21:12
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