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So i save the time-stamp as a Date object and a timezone as a TimeZone object.

Now i want to make a function that takes a Date object and a TimeZone object as argument and returns a Date object adjusted using the time-stamp.

For example :

Input :

Date    TimeZone 

12:00   Moscow Standard Time (UTC+3)

Output :

Date 

3:00    

Edit: Removed Note about Calendar

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Calendar's the way to do this. What does your use case have to do with the internal objects you use to solve the problem? –  The Thom Dec 13 '11 at 21:07
    
What i meant is i dont want to save calendar object in db, ill edit that to clarify. can you provide example of how to convert it using calendar? –  Jimmy Dec 13 '11 at 21:10
    
ahh joda time makes life so much easier. –  Andy Pryor Dec 13 '11 at 21:13
    
i know ! im gonna switch the whole code 'one day' to joda. for now im stuck with date in java –  Jimmy Dec 13 '11 at 21:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A java.util.Date is an absolute point in time. 0900 hours UTC and 1200 hours UTC+3 are the exact same java.util.Date object. There is no 'adjustment' to be made to it in order to represent one or the other.

To get the human readable representation accounting for a particular timezone, you can set a timezone on a DateFormat object.

DateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm");
format.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC+3"));
String time = format.format(yourDate);

Solution for the question posed in comment:

Calendar cal1 = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC+3"));
cal1.setTime(yourDate);
Calendar cal2 = Calendar.getInstance(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));
cal2.clear();
cal2.set(Calendar.YEAR, cal1.get(Calendar.YEAR));
cal2.set(Calendar.MONTH, cal1.get(Calendar.MONTH));
cal2.set(Calendar.DATE, cal1.get(Calendar.DATE));
cal2.set(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY, cal1.get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY));
//simile for whatever level of field precision is needed
Date shiftedDate = cal2.getTime();
share|improve this answer
    
i want to shift the absolute point in time based on the time zone (UTC+3), so lets say i have 0900 hours UTC i want to make it 1200 hours "UTC" and get that timestamp not a string –  Jimmy Dec 13 '11 at 21:20
    
Hmm, if you have access to the code that's generating the input, I would personally very much favor fixing the input parser. Either way, here's how you do what you've asked. :) –  Affe Dec 13 '11 at 21:36
    
Thanks but i found an easier way, take a look at my answer. –  Jimmy Dec 13 '11 at 21:51
    
That way fails around leap seconds and daylight savings switches, is why I did not use it ;) –  Affe Dec 13 '11 at 21:54

Here you go:

/**
 * Convert a calendar from its current time zone to UTC (Greenwich Mean Time)
 * @param local the time
 * @return a calendar with the UTC time
 */
public static Calendar convertTimeToUtc(Calendar local){
    int offset = local.getTimeZone().getOffset(local.getTimeInMillis());
    GregorianCalendar utc = new GregorianCalendar(TZ_UTC);
    utc.setTimeInMillis(local.getTimeInMillis());
    utc.add(Calendar.MILLISECOND, -offset);

    return utc;
}

/**
 * Convert a UTC date into the specified time zone
 * @param tzName the name of the time zone for the output calendar
 * @param utc the UTC time being converted
 * @return a calendar in the specified time zone with the appropriate date
 */
public static Calendar convertTimeToLocal(String tzName, Calendar utc) {
    TimeZone zone = TimeZone.getTimeZone(tzName);
    int offset = zone.getOffset(utc.getTimeInMillis());
    GregorianCalendar local = new GregorianCalendar(zone);
    local.setTimeInMillis(utc.getTimeInMillis());
    local.add(Calendar.MILLISECOND, offset);

    return local;
}

/**
 * Convert a UTC date into the specified time zone
 * @param zone the time zone of the output calendar
 * @param utc the UTC time being converted
 * @return a calendar in the specified time zone with the appropriate date
 */
public static Calendar convertTimeToLocal(TimeZone zone, Calendar utc) {
    int offset = zone.getOffset(utc.getTimeInMillis());
    GregorianCalendar local = new GregorianCalendar(zone);
    local.setTimeInMillis(utc.getTimeInMillis());
    local.add(Calendar.MILLISECOND, offset);

    return local;
}
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If you aren't using Calendar, what are you using? Another library perhaps?

If not, you have that +3 there at the end of your timezone...you could use that to bump the hour (+/-)X; in this case, +3. Just remember that, in this case (for instance) 11+3=2. This math could be accomplished by adding hour + offset, taking that value % 12, and setting that answer as the hour (setting an answer of 0 to 12 if so desired). Does that make sense?

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Great, the question was edited out from under me. Disregard this answer. –  Cody S Dec 13 '11 at 21:11
    
What i meant is i dont want to save calendar object in db. i removed that note. i could use Calendar to convert it. can you provide an example. –  Jimmy Dec 13 '11 at 21:13

I found an easy way to accomplish that using the rowOffset of the desired time zone :

Date date = new Date();
int rawOffset = TimeZone.getTimeZone("EST").getRawOffset(); 
Date adjustedDate = new Date(date.getTime() + rawOffset)

Edit: as Affe point out this will ignore leap seconds and daylight saving.

share|improve this answer
1  
This way is not strictly correct across leap seconds and may or may not do what you want across daylight saving switches depending on how your requirements are worded. If that's relevant depends on what you're using it for and how. –  Affe Dec 13 '11 at 21:56
    
Good point. my answer will not consider leap seconds or daylight saving. –  Jimmy Dec 13 '11 at 22:15

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