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I'm trying to figure out how to completely fill a custom geometry. It seems like it should be a common question, but I haven't really been able to find any solutions.

I have the following example geometry:

    <Path Fill="White" Stretch="Fill" Stroke="Black" StrokeThickness="2">
        <Path.Data>
            <PathGeometry
                Figures="M112,296C112,296 136,296 136,320 M112,344C112,344 136,344 136,320 M112,296L112,296 96,296 96,344 112,344"/>
        </Path.Data>
    </Path>

Which produces the following result:

Undesired Fill Result

This is the result I would like to see:

Desired Fill Result

Any Ideas? I know I could make a single arc and that would resolve this particular case, but in my application the user can draw any type of geometry so the result could be composed of any number of "primitives" (PolyLineSegments, EllipseGeometries, ArcSegments, etc) and in the case that the resultant geometry contains some type of closed area, I'd like to accurately fill that area.

EDIT:

Here is an example of what a CombinedGeometry looks like if I ensure all three adjacent geometries overlap and create a unioned CombinedGeometry with the following code:

        <Path Grid.Row="2" Fill="White" Stretch="Fill" Stroke="Black" StrokeThickness="2">
        <Path.Data>
            <CombinedGeometry GeometryCombineMode="Union">
                <CombinedGeometry.Geometry1>
                    <CombinedGeometry GeometryCombineMode="Union">
                        <CombinedGeometry.Geometry1>
                            <PathGeometry
                                Figures="M111,293C111,296 136,293 136,325"/>
                        </CombinedGeometry.Geometry1>
                        <CombinedGeometry.Geometry2>
                            <PathGeometry
                                Figures="M111,346C111,344 136,344 136,320"/>
                        </CombinedGeometry.Geometry2>
                    </CombinedGeometry>
                </CombinedGeometry.Geometry1>
                <CombinedGeometry.Geometry2>
                    <PathGeometry
                        Figures="M125,296L115,296 96,296 96,344 120,344"/>
                </CombinedGeometry.Geometry2>
            </CombinedGeometry>
        </Path.Data>
    </Path>

And here is the result:

Combined Geometry

I was hoping it would union just the strokes and automagically figure out the correct filling for the new contiguous polygon... bummer.

EDIT 2:

Hmm so I think I've come up with a couple possible solutions, neither of which are as easy as I was hoping they would be. The first option would be to combine all of the geometries as above using a CombineGeometry structure, then I called "GetFlattenedPathGeometry" on the resultant "CombineGeometry" in order to get a PathGeometry. Next I iterate over each Figure in the PathGeometry and just remove those which are holes (which I think you should be able to do by getting rid of all the figures which are entirely contained by another, or holes may follow a convention of having either clockwise or counter-clockwise coordinates, not sure..), if all goes well you should be left with a single fully filled geometry.

The second option would be to again call "GetFlattenedPathGeometry" on whatever the resultant path is, so as to get a vertex based polygonal approximation of the path (without all the curve, arc, ellipse, etc notation, we want a path containing only points and lines). After that, you would just combine all the resultant figures/segments into a single figure whose segments are ordered either clockwise or counter-clockwise.

I've tested both approaches and they seem to work with at least the simple test case outlined above, though they will not work with more complex shapes (self-intersecting, concave, etc).. support which I require.. so the question remains, how do I do this??

EDIT 3:

Here is a more complicated geometry in which ordering/combining becomes more difficult:

        <Path Fill="White" Stretch="Fill" Stroke="Black" StrokeThickness="2">
        <Path.Data>
            <PathGeometry
            Figures="M104,160C104,160 72,160 72,136
                M104,128C104,128 72,128 72,152
                M152,232L152,232 152,216 120,216 120,160 128,160
                M152,232L152,232 72,232 104,216 104,160 96,160
                M104,128L104,128 168,128
                M128,160L128,160 168,160
                M165,160L168,160 200,128
                M200,160L200,160 200,128
                M200,160L200,160 168,128 152,128"/>
        </Path.Data>
    </Path>

Which produces:

enter image description here

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3 Answers

Your example geometry is a combination of three adjacent shapes which do not overlap. The stroke is drawn on the outside edges simply because the shapes are not closed and the inner stroke lines do not exist. Although it may appear that the shapes are being merged and the stroke is applied to the geometry as a whole, that is not what is happening.

Closing the hole becomes a more complex problem of programmatically detecting the hole and closing it with the appropriate shape or by creating a new combined shape which doesn't have the hole (possibly by detecting and tracing the outer points). I am not aware of any functionality in WPF which can help you with this task. There does exist a CombinedGeometry class which can produce a union of two overlapping shapes. The shapes in this example are not overlapping.

Without context, it is hard to recommend a solution. If this is a free form drawing program, perhaps the user simply has to draw another shape in the middle to close the geometry.

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Thanks for your reply. By "closing the hole" do you mean the hole in the fill, or the small gap between the adjacent geometries? If you mean the gap between geometries, I'll post an edit shortly with a crude CombinedGeometry example which seems to have the same issue when the strokes of the adjacent geometries do overlap and are combined with a union. Thanks again! –  Craig Dec 14 '11 at 14:41
    
Happy to help. I was referring to the large area you are trying to fill in, not the small gap between the adjacent geometries. As your edited experiment demonstrates, the combined union of multiple shapes does not eliminate the hole. I could not find any functionality within WPF which would identify and remove holes enclosed within touching or overlapping geometries. Your approach of combining the geometry and removing figures which are fully enclosed sounds like a great start. –  Scott Dec 15 '11 at 4:27
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Treat it as a "connect the points" problem :)

You have 5 points:

  • 96,296 - top left point (corner)
  • 112,296 - top - start of bezier curve
  • 136,320 - far right - end of first bezier curve, start of second one
  • 112,344 - bottom - end of second bezier
  • 96,344 - bottom left point (corner)

And now, we shall connect them.

<Path Fill="White" Stretch="Fill" Stroke="Black" StrokeThickness="2">
    <Path.Data>
        <PathGeometry Figures="M112,296 C112,296 136,296 136,320 C136,320 136,344 112,344 M112,344 96,344 96,296 112,296"/>
    </Path.Data>
</Path>

You can also use <GeometryGroup FillRule="Nonzero" ...> to fill your custom path from 1st post. Default is FillRule="EvenOdd", which produces filling like yours.*

See Path Markup Syntax (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms752293.aspx) for more information on path mini-language.

  • Changed <Path> to <GeometryGroup>

EDIT 1:

I reordered your path a bit:

<Path Fill="White" Stretch="Fill" Stroke="Black" StrokeThickness="2">
    <Path.Data>
        <PathGeometry Figures="M72,152 C72,152 72,128 104,128 L168,128 200,160 200,128 168,160 120,160 120,216 152,216 152,232 72,232 104,216 104,160 C104,160 72,160 72,136"/>
    </Path.Data>
</Path>

Which gives us:

New shape

Drawing path is like using some kind of "draw shape" tool in vector editing software, where you have to select next points, and when you don't have next one - shape is automatically closed (last point is connected to first one, but just for the purpose of filling shape - we can see how it's done, when we look at the 'nose' of new shape). In your example You have 9 separate shapes (each one in separate line, where M specifies start of new figure), and they are all filled in the said-above-way.

Ofcourse, you can use GeometryGroup (with FillRule) or CombinedGeometry (with CombinedGeometryMode) to connect shapes.

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Thanks for the reply. Ordering the figures in clockwise order is something I tried and found to work for simple shapes, but the same approach won't work for more complex shapes (self-intersecting, concave, etc). Also, Path doesn't have a property "FillRule" (at least not in .NET 3.5), but I have tried placing the geometries into a GeometryGroup who's FillRule was Nonzero, but I ended up with the same results. I will post a more complex geometry shortly and hopefully you can prove me wrong :). –  Craig Dec 19 '11 at 14:32
    
Nice. So how would you propose I order the geometry programmatically? My tool allows for the user to construct these shapes out of any combination of geometries, so I end up with something like I posted above, where the geometries are ordered in whatever way the user added them to the canvas. I will need to reorder these geometries programmatically so they are filled correctly. I've tried using CombinedGeometry, but that unions not only the stroke but the fill as well, so you end up with something similar to what you started with. –  Craig Dec 20 '11 at 14:07
    
When creating geometry, you can try adding next shape ("primitive") without starting new figure (Mxxx,xxx) - in case of ie. bezier curves first controlpoint should be automatically set (coords same like last point). You can try something like this (x,y are custom coords): PathGeometry geom = new PathGeometry(); PathFigure path = new PathFigure(); path.StartPoint = new Point(x,y); geom.Figures.Add(path); LineSegment line = new LineSegment(); line.Point = new Point(x,y); path.Segments.Add(line); and so on.... You should also assign geom to xamlPathObject.Data –  Paweł Halicki Dec 20 '11 at 23:12
    
Unfortunately, I'm not sure I could place this type of constraint on the users of my application. I would need a way to arrive at the target geometry given the crazy input. I wonder if I were to tessellate the input geometry and draw the resultant triangles without a stroke as the fill hmm. –  Craig Dec 21 '11 at 13:37
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I found an interesting article about creating shapes with wpf using a svg-file created with a graphic-tool like inkscape. This might give you some insight.

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