Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have 10 threads that are supposed to be waiting for signal. Until now I've simply done 'sleep(3)', and that has been working fine, but is there are a more secure way to make sure, that all threads have been created and are indeed waiting.

I made the following construction where I in critical region, before the wait, increment a counter telling how many threads are waiting. But then I have to have an additional mutex and conditional for signalling back to the main that all threads are created, it seems overly complex.

Am I missing some basic thread design pattern?

Thanks edit: fixed types

edit: clarifying information below

A barrier won't work in this case, because I'm not interested in letting my threads wait until all threads are ready. This already happens with the 'cond_wait'.

I'm interested in letting the main function know, when all threads are ready and waiting.

//mutex and conditional to signal from main to threads to do work
mutex_t mutex_for_cond;
condt_t cond;

//mutex and conditional to signal back from thread to main that threads are ready
mutex_t mutex_for_back_cond;
condt_t back_cond;

int nThreads=0;//threadsafe by using mutex_for_cond

void *thread(){
    mutex_lock(mutex_for_cond);
    nThreads++;
    if(nThreads==10){
      mutex_lock(mutex_for_back_cond)
      cond_signal(back_cond);
      mutex_unlock(mutex_for_back_cond)
    }while(1){
      cond_wait(cond,mutext_for_cond);
      if(spurious)
        continue; 
      else
        break;
    }
    mutex_unlock(mutex_for_cond);
    //do work on non critical region data
}

int main(){
for(int i=0;i<10)
   create_threads;

while(1){
   mutex_lock(mutex_for_back_cond);
   cond_wait(back_cond,mutex_for_back_cond);
   mutex_unlock(mutex_for_back_cond);
   mutex_lock(mutex_for_cond);
   if(nThreads==10){
     break;
   }else{
     //spurious wakeup 
     mutex_unlock(mutex_for_cond);
   }
}
//now all threads are waiting
//mutex_for_cond is still locked so broadcast
cond_broadcast(cond);//was type here


}
share|improve this question
    
Your version that you present here already is buggy. (1) you are reading nThreads without holding a lock. (2) In case of "spurious wakeup" you unlock the mutex twice. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 13 '11 at 23:12
    
And your client also locks twice. Perhaps you try to get your existing code in order, before you try to introduce further complications. –  Jens Gustedt Dec 13 '11 at 23:13
    
1) Where is nThreads not being protected by the mutex_for_cond ? 2) how can the mutex_unlock be hit twice in case of spurious wakeup, there is no mutex_unlock(mutex_for_cond after the while. –  monkeyking Dec 14 '11 at 0:23
add comment

3 Answers

Am I missing some basic thread design pattern?

Yes. For every condition, there should be a variable that is protected by the accompanying mutex. Only the change of this variable is indicated by signals on the condition variable.

You check the variable in a loop, waiting on the condition:

mutex_lock(mutex_for_back_cond);
while ( ready_threads < 10 )
   cond_wait(back_cond,mutex_for_back_cond);
mutex_unlock( mutex_for_back_cond );

Additionally, what you are trying to build is a thread barrier. It is often pre-implemented in threading libraries, like pthread_barrier_wait.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Sensible threading APIs have a barrier construct which does precisely this.

For example, with boost::thread, you would create a barrier like this:

boost::barrier bar(10); // a barrier for 10 threads

and then each thread would wait on the barrier:

bar.wait();

the barrier waits until the specified number of threads are waiting for it, and then releases them all at once. In other words, once all ten threads have been created and are ready, it'll allow them all to proceed.

That's the simple, and sane, way of doing it. Threading APIs which do not have a barrier construct require you to do it the hard way, not unlike what you're doing now.

share|improve this answer
1  
the pthreads equivalent is pthread_barrier_t, by the way –  jalf Dec 13 '11 at 21:36
    
a barrier within the threads, is not what I'm looking for. I want the main function to know, when all threads are waiting. –  monkeyking Dec 13 '11 at 21:38
2  
So create the barrier for 11 threads, and have the main thread wait on it along with the 10 helper threads? –  jalf Dec 13 '11 at 22:26
    
My main starts 10 threads, and when these threads are waiting my main should be notified. How will starting 11 threads and use a barrier signal back to my main that the 10/11 are indeed waiting? Because the threads have reached the barrier, doesn't mean they have reached the cond_wait –  monkeyking Dec 14 '11 at 0:16
2  
Remove the condition variable. The barrier alone does what you need as far as I can tell. –  jalf Dec 14 '11 at 8:00
add comment

You should associate some variable that contains the 'event state' with the condition variable. The main thread sets the event state variable appropriately just before issuing the broadcast. The threads that are interested in the event check the event state variable regardless of whether they've blocked on the condition variable or not.

With this pattern, the main thread doesn't need to know about the precise state of the threads - it just sets the event when it needs to then broadcasts the condition. Any waiting threads will be unblocked, and any threads not waiting yet will never block on the condition variable because they'll note that the event has already occurred before waiting on the condition. Something like the following pseudocode:

//mutex and conditional to signal from main to threads to do work
pthread_mutex_t mutex_for_cond;
pthread_cond_t cond;
int event_occurred = 0;

void *thread() 
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex_for_cond);
    while (!event_occurred) {
            pthread_cond_wait( &cond, &mutex_for_cond);
    }
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex_for_cond);

    //do work on non critical region data
}

int main()
{
    pthread_mutex_init(&mutex_for_cond, ...);
    pthread_cond_init(&cond, ...);

    for(int i=0;i<10)
        create_threads(...);

    // do whatever needs to done to set up the work for the threads

    // now let the threads know they can do their work (whether or not
    //  they've gotten to the "wait point" yet)
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex_for_cond);
    event_occured = 1;
    pthread_cond_broadcast(&cond);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex_for_cond);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.