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Hope i'm not putting too much code in here .. I have what i consider a strange problem .. I have 2 classes ..

class Card {
    String customerNumber
    String memberId
    String cardNumber
    String issueNumber

    Boolean active = true

    // Audit info ..
    Date dateCreated
    String createdBy
    Integer uniqId
}
class CardHistory extends Card {
    static constraints = {
        note(nullable: true, size:1..500)
    }

    // History note
    String note

    // Audit info ..
    Date originalDateCreated
    String originalCreatedBy
    Integer originalUniqId

}

and another ..

class Seat {
... 
    Card activeCard 
}

I have some code which generates a history record from the current one by doing

cardHistoryInstance.properties = seat.card.properties

but it's throwing a NullPointerException ..

So I wrote this to test it ..

def seat = Seat.get(1)

try{
    def cardHistoryEntry = new CardHistory(); 
    println cardHistoryEntry.properties
    println "properties okay  .." 

    assert seat
    println "Seat okay  ..."

    assert seat.card
    println "Card okay  ..."

    println seat.card.dateCreated
    println "Date okay  ..."

    .... and each of the other properties    

    println seat.card.customerNumber 
    println "customer number okay .. "

    println "Seems okay  .."

    println seat.card.properties    <----  Blows up with NPE here ..  
    println "Don't get to here"
}
catch(e)
{
    println  "OOps .. An error occurred ${e} .."
}

So basically I can get at each property individually but accessing via properties keyword is giving me a npe .. Can anyone shed any light on this ?? Grails 1.3.6 ..

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Post the stacktrace from exception you get to see which line causes NPE. –  Tomasz Kalkosiński Dec 13 '11 at 22:27
    
Thats what has me confused .. The stack trace points to the line i've highlighted .. println seat.card.properties .. It gives me a npe BUT i can print each of the individual properties ! –  user566311 Dec 13 '11 at 23:59

1 Answer 1

No, you should refer to the property of Seat as activeCard, not card:

try{
    def cardHistoryEntry = new CardHistory(); 
    println cardHistoryEntry.properties
    println "properties okay  .." 

    assert seat
    println "Seat okay  ..."

    assert seat.activeCard
    println "Card okay  ..."

    println seat.activeCard.dateCreated
    println "Date okay  ..."

    println seat.activeCard.customerNumber 
    println "customer number okay .. "

    println "Seems okay  .."

    println seat.activeCard.properties
    println "Don't get to here"
}
catch(e)
{
    println  "OOps .. An error occurred ${e} .."
}
share|improve this answer
    
@user566311: the tricky thing here is that when I run your example, it actually PASS the above "card" reference without any error, and only pop out at the last statement. But when I just change one "card" into "activeCard", the error pop out at the right place. How weird –  Hoàng Long Dec 14 '11 at 7:25
    
Sorry , I simplified class to remove unnecessary code and replaced activeCard with card by mistake BUT problem remains as stated .. I can access each property separately BUT can't access properties value .. Are you saying that you have same result ? –  user566311 Dec 14 '11 at 9:37
    
@user566311: no, it works fine for me. I use the same code you post here, only with seat.activeCard instead of seat.card –  Hoàng Long Dec 14 '11 at 10:52
    
Back to drawing board then ! –  user566311 Dec 15 '11 at 10:23

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