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can anyone explain whats happening here. I was under the impression that an array's size can't be changed once its been created and declared.

public class ArrayManipulation 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        int a[] = {1, 2, 3};//new int[3];
        int b[] = new int[a.length-1];

        System.out.print("a = ");
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
            System.out.print(a[i] + "  ");
        System.out.println();

        for (int i = 0; i < b.length; i++)
            b[i] = a[i];
        //This is the bit I am confused about.. I was expecting an error here
        a = b;

        System.out.print("a = ");
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
           System.out.print(a[i] + "  ");
        System.out.println();       
    }
}
share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Arrays are objects, and yes, once they are created their size doesnt change.

in the line:

a= b;

you are pointing a reference to b object. So your initial object that a was referencing is still in VM until it s garbage collected.

But your array size didnt change but you reference is pointing to a differet array/object now

share|improve this answer

Both a and b are of type int[]. So a = b simply assign the value of a to the value of b.

After this assignment, both a and b refer to the same array and the initial array referenced by a can be collected by the garbage collector as it cannot be accessed anymore.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes the size is not part of the type/class. Some languages (like Pascal, Algol68) offer this. But in java an array variable is just a pointer, and the array value contains the field length. – Joop Eggen Dec 13 '11 at 22:50

You are changing the reference that a points to when you say a = b.

Since arrays are objects, setting one equal to another changes the reference. Both arrays still exist, but both references - a and b - point to the location of b. The only way to actually delete the array a is to garbage collect it.

You aren't actually changing the array size, it just seems like it.

share|improve this answer
    //This is the bit I am confused about.. I was expecting an error here
    a = b;

Yup, you're confused abt the right thing! a and b have their own memory allocated for themselves. With a = b you are making a point to the memory allocated for b.

Perhaps adding these additional sysouts to code would help, see the output:

public class ArrayManipulation 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        int a[] = {1, 2, 3};//new int[3];
        int b[] = new int[a.length-1];


        System.out.print("a = ");
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
            System.out.print(a[i] + "  ");
        System.out.println();

        for (int i = 0; i < b.length; i++)
            b[i] = a[i];

        System.out.print("NEW -- before a=b. a = " + a);
        System.out.print("NEW -- before a=b. b = " + b);
        //This is the bit I am confused about.. I was expecting an error here
        a = b;
        System.out.print("NEW -- after a=b. a = " + a);
        System.out.print("NEW -- after a=b. b = " + b);

        System.out.print("a = ");
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
           System.out.print(a[i] + "  ");
        System.out.println();       
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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