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This is my code:

unit Unit1;

interface

uses
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms,
  Dialogs, StdCtrls, ComCtrls;

...

implementation

{$R *.dfm}

uses Unit2;

...    

procedure TForm1.Button4Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Frame2.Show;
end;

I got this compiler error:

Undeclared identifier: 'Frame2'

Then I tried to declare it:

Frame2: TFrame2;

Edit:

Further explenation form comment.

Ok I will be precise. I use anwser ardnew Frame2: TFrame; and I get ** access violation** and with out it I get Undeclared identifier: 'Frame2' now I'm more precise?

share|improve this question
    
Is this delphi or Pascal? –  octopusgrabbus Dec 14 '11 at 0:03
    
@octopusgrabbus Delphi Pascal –  Dudi Dec 14 '11 at 0:05
    
In your OnClick, do you mean Form2? –  Marcus Adams Dec 14 '11 at 0:25
    
What do you mean with "not working"? Did you get the same compiler error? Or did the frame not show? Or did you get another error? Please describe exactly what happened. –  NGLN Dec 14 '11 at 16:53
    
-1 for "not working." Be precise. –  Rob Kennedy Dec 14 '11 at 22:51
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You did not show the contents of Unit2, so we can only speculate. It sounds like there is no Frame2 global variable declared in Unit2.pas. That would account for the undeclared identifier error. Declare the variable yourself, and instantiate an instance of the TFrame2 class before you can then Show() it, eg:

unit Unit1; 

interface 

uses 
  Windows, Messages, SysUtils, Variants, Classes, Graphics, Controls, Forms, 
  Dialogs, StdCtrls, ComCtrls; 

... 

implementation 

{$R *.dfm} 

uses
  Unit2; 

var
  Frame2: TFrame2 = nil;

...     

procedure TForm1.Button4Click(Sender: TObject); 
begin 
  if not Assigned(Frame2) then
  begin
    Frame2 := TFrame2.Create(Self);
    Frame2.Parent := Self;
  end;
  Frame2.Show; 
end; 
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Yet another option would be to add the frame to the form in the designer and let the framework manage its lifetime –  David Heffernan Dec 14 '11 at 7:39
    
Answer may be correct, but I see it very necessary to include an example of also freeing Frame2 when done with it. Anyone who doesn't understand creation most likely won't understand freeing either - they go hand in hand. –  Jerry Dodge Dec 14 '11 at 17:16
    
In the example, I use Self as the frame's Owner, so there is no need to free it manually. It will be freed when the TForm is freed. –  Remy Lebeau Dec 14 '11 at 21:10
    
I have problem because I still getting Error "udeclared identifier: ' TFrame2' " –  Dudi Dec 17 '11 at 21:27
    
Then Unit2.pas does not declare any TFrame2 class. What does Unit2 actually declare? What unit did you actually implement a TFrame2 class in? Either Unit2 is not the correct unit you should be using, or TFrame2 is not the correct class name. You have a mismatch in your setup either way. –  Remy Lebeau Dec 18 '11 at 1:55
add comment

You need to create the frame somehow, you can't access it without.

This example presumes you are creating 2 different "TFrame2" instances at once just temporarily, then closing (and freeing) them when done (in a try..finally block). There are many other ways of creating and freeing, but the general concept is if you create it, you have to free it...

procedure TForm1.Button4Click(Sender: TObject);
var
  F1, F2: TFrame2;
begin
  //You have to first create the instances of "TFrame2"...
  F1:= TFrame2.Create(Self);
  F2:= TFrame2.Create(Self);
  try
    F1.Left:= 0;
    F2.Left:= Self.Width - F2.Width;
    F1.Parent := Self;
    F2.Parent := Self;
    F1.Show;
    F2.Show;
    Application.ProcessMessages;
    ShowMessage('There should be 2 instances of "TFrame2" showing on your main form');
  finally
    //And you have to free them when you're done...
    F1.Free;
    F2.Free;
  end;
end; 

Or if this "TFrame2" is elsewhere...

procedure TForm1.Create(Sender: TObject);
begin
  //Create it first
  Frame2:= TFrame2.Create(Self);
  Frame2.Parent := Self;
  Frame2.Left:= 0;
  Frame2.Show;
end;

procedure TForm1.Destroy(Sender: TObject);
begin
  if assigned(Frame2) then begin
    Frame2.Free;
    Frame2:= nil;
  end;
end;

Be careful though, because you might already be creating this "TFrame2"... Go to Project > Options > Forms and look to see if "Frame2" is auto-create or not.

share|improve this answer
    
-1. TFrame is designed to be embedded in a container window, not shown standalone, and you call Show (which is non-modal) but then Free the "shown" wrongly used TFrame (meaning any click on a control on it is accessing something that doesn't exist any longer and will cause an AV). The use of Application.ProcessMessages alone should warrant a second downvote if it was allowed. –  Ken White Dec 14 '11 at 2:52
    
Never used frames... –  Jerry Dodge Dec 14 '11 at 4:45
1  
Then perhaps you shouldn't answer questions about them? :) Also, with the exception of the part about needing a container, the rest of my comment would apply to TForm as well; you can't Create, Show and then free them while they're still showing (AVs), and Application.ProcessMessages should get a downvote almost automatically (unless you can thoroughly explain why you're using it and the reason is very convincing). –  Ken White Dec 14 '11 at 12:30
2  
@Ken, ProcessMessages actually seems appropriate for this example. It calls Show on two controls that might otherwise have been invisible, but to make sure they're fully painted, we process whatever pending messages there are before displaying a message claiming that the frames are visible. After that message, the demo is over, so it's correct to free the controls. They're in local variables, so there will be no further references to them once they're freed. It's also safe to free a visible form. You've criticized this as production code instead of looking at it as a demo of showing controls. –  Rob Kennedy Dec 14 '11 at 12:55
    
The concept of the answer was right, but was originally assuming "TFrame2" was a Form, not a Frame. Modified answer, and added another sample. –  Jerry Dodge Dec 14 '11 at 14:25
show 3 more comments

I guess it should be declared as

Frame2: TFrame;
share|improve this answer
    
but honestly, who can tell –  ardnew Dec 14 '11 at 0:05
    
I got exeption access violation. –  Dudi Dec 14 '11 at 0:06
    
since nobody can see where you are instantiating a TFrame object, and you clearly don't find that sort of thing important enough to post in the original question, I'll assume you aren't doing it –  ardnew Dec 14 '11 at 0:09
    
I don't understand I'm not doing what? –  Dudi Dec 14 '11 at 0:16
2  
Instantiating Frame2 before you Show() it. –  Remy Lebeau Dec 14 '11 at 0:53
show 1 more comment

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