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I'm fairly new to C++, and I'm not sure about this one. Have a look at the following example which sums up my current problem.

class Foo
{
    //stuff
};

class Bar
{
    Foo foo;
};

So Bar constains a full Foo object, not just a reference or pointer. Is this object initialized by its default constructor ? Do I need to explicitly call its constructor, and if so, how and where ?

Thanks.

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2  
You're missing ; after each class, btw. :) –  GManNickG May 11 '09 at 20:06
7  
And better remove the "I'm familiar with C++", too :) –  xtofl May 11 '09 at 20:10
3  
I am familiar with C++ and I still have some doubts to this extent each so often. Moreover, most answers plainly state that the Foo default constructor will be called and the fact is that it depends on the definition of Foo itself. Is it a user provided or implicit default constructor? Does it have any private member attributes? Initialization in C++ is not simple. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 12 '09 at 5:53
1  
Quite funny that @xtofl requests the poster to remove the 'I'm familiar with C++'... Maybe most people is not that 'familiar' with C++ when almost all the answers are wrong. In fact initialization is hard, some of the people that answered have proven their C++ knowledge @JaredPar, @dirkgently, @David Thornley and yet failed. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 12 '09 at 22:17

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It will be initialized by its default constructor. If you want to use a different constructor, you might have something like this:

class Foo
{
    public: 
    Foo(int val) { }
    //stuff
};

class Bar
{
    public:
    Bar() : foo(2) { }

    Foo foo;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Syntax error: you need a colon (:) after the public keyword. –  dirkgently May 11 '09 at 20:12
2  
And a semi colon (;) after the closing } of each class. I blame Java. –  richq May 11 '09 at 20:17
5  
:-) uservoice request: code completion and error highlighting on the markdown box thingy. –  richq May 11 '09 at 20:43
2  
The first sentence is wrong. Initialization of Foo is not guaranteed. It depends on how Foo is defined for the given Bar. Read my answer at the end of the page: stackoverflow.com/questions/849812/… –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 12 '09 at 22:05
1  
The point here is that the answer only applies with a subset of the possibilities. The fact that Bar does not have a user provided constructor could suggest that Foo does not either, and in that case the answer is wrong. Answering the question without knowing the fact is like trying to answer 'do I have to drive on the left or on the right side of a two way street?'. It depends on unknown factors: 'are you driving in the US or in UK?' providing an uninformed answer 'on the right', without warnings can end up in accidents. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 13 '09 at 5:58

Construction is a fairly hard topic in C++. The simple answer is it depends. Whether Foo is initialized or not depends on the definition of Foo itself. About the second question: how to make Bar initialize Foo: initialization lists are the answer.

While general consensus is that Foo will be default initialized by the implicit default constructor (compiler generated), that does not need to hold true.

If Foo does not have a user defined default constructor then Foo will be uninitialized. To be more precise: each member of Bar or Foo lacking a user defined default constructor will be uninitialized by the compiler generated default constructor of Bar:

class Foo {
   int x;
public:
   void dump() { std::cout << x << std::endl; }
   void set() { x = 5; }
};
class Bar {
   Foo x;
public:
   void dump() { x.dump(); }
   void set() { x.set(); } 
};
class Bar2
{
   Foo x;
public:
   Bar2() : Foo() {}
   void dump() { x.dump(); }
   void set() { x.set(); }
};
template <typename T>
void test_internal() {
   T x;
   x.dump();
   x.set();
   x.dump();
}
template <typename T>
void test() {
   test_internal<T>();
   test_internal<T>();
}
int main()
{
   test<Foo>(); // prints ??, 5, 5, 5, where ?? is a random number, possibly 0
   test<Bar>(); // prints ??, 5, 5, 5
   test<Bar2>(); // prints 0, 5, 0, 5
}

Now, if Foo had a user defined constructor then it would be initialized always, regardless of whether Bar has or not a user initialized constructor. If Bar has a user defined constructor that explicitly calls the (possibly implicitly defined) constructor of Foo, then Foo will in fact be initialized. If the initialization list of Bar does not call the Foo constructor then it will be equivalent to the case where Bar had no user defined constructor.

The test code may need some explaining. We are interested on whether the compiler does initialize the variable without the user code actually calling the constructor. We want to test whether the object is initialized or not. Now if we just create an object in a function it might happen to hit a memory position that was untouched and already contains zeroes. We want to differentiate luck from success, so we define a variable in a function and call the function twice. In the first run, it will print the memory contents and force a change. In the second call to the function, as the stack trace is the same, the variable will be held in exactly the same memory position. If it was initialized, it would be set to 0, else it would keep the same value the old variable in exactly the same position had.

In each of the test runs, the first value printed is the initialized value (if it was actually initialized) or the value in that memory position, that in some cases happen to be 0. The second value is just a test token representing the value at the memory position after manually changing it. The third value comes from the second run of the function. If the variable is being initialized it will fall back to 0. If the object is not initialized, its memory will keep the old contents.

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Do you know why when you run test<Foo>() the output is ??, 5, 5, 5 instead of ??,5,??,5 doesn't the Foo object (x) go out of scope when test_internal returns? Similarly for test<Bar>() ? –  user1084113 Sep 11 '12 at 2:26
    
@user1084113: Because it is undefined behavior, you could get either, but the test abuses knowledge of how compilers/architectures commonly use the stack. Basically, when a function is entered it grabs a piece of the stack for its internal variables that then releases when the function ends (depending on the calling convention it might be the caller or the function that updates the stack pointer). The second call to the function uses the same block of memory for local variables, laid in the same order. The x is uninitialized, having the value assigned in the last run of the function. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 11 '12 at 3:38

There are four functions the C++ compiler will generate for each class, if it can, and if you don't provide them: a default constructor, a copy constructor, an assignment operator, and a destructor. In the C++ Standard (chapter 12, "Special Functions"), these are referred to as "implicitly declared" and "implicitly defined". They will have public access.

Don't confuse "implicitly-defined" with "default" in a constructor. The default constructor is the one that can be called without any arguments, if there is one. If you provide no constructor, a default one will be implicitly defined. It will use the default constructors for each base class and data member.

So, what is happening is that class Foo has an implicitly defined default constructor, and Bar (which doesn't seem to have a user-defined constructor) uses its implicitly defined default constructor which calls Foo's default constructor.

If you did want to write a constructor for Bar, you could mention foo in its initializer list, but since you're using the default constructor you don't actually have to specify it.

Remember that, if you do write a constructor for Foo, the compiler will not automatically generate a default constructor, and so you will have to specify one if you need one. Therefore, if you were to put something like Foo(int n); into the definition of Foo, and didn't explicitly write a default constructor (either Foo(); or Foo(int n = 0);), you couldn't have a Bar in its present form, since it couldn't use Foo's default constructor. In this case, you'd have to have a constructor like Bar(int n = 0): foo(n) {} having the Bar constructor initialize the Foo. (Note that Bar(int n = 0) {foo = n;} or the like wouldn't work, since the Bar constructor would first try to initialize foo, and that would fail.)

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The implicitly defined constructor in Bar will NOT call an implicitly defined constructor in Foo. If Foo has a user defined constructor then Bar implicitly defined constructor will (this time yes) call the user defined constructor in Foo. This is the most complete answer up to here nonetheless: +1 –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 12 '09 at 22:12
    
Sure about that? According to 12.6.2(4), a nonstatic data member is initialized with its default constructor if not mentioned in the initializer list, and in 8.5(5) the default constructor is called unless it's a POD (Plain Old Data, not conveniently defined in the Standard) type, in which case it's initialized to zero. So, I guess the question is whether Foo is a POD type, which we don't get to see. If it's POD type, it's all zero-initialized; if it has one of the things that mark it as non-POD, it's default-initialized and therefore calls the implicitly defined default constructor. –  David Thornley May 13 '09 at 15:05

If you do not explicitly call a constructor of foo inside of Bar's constructor then the default one will be used. You can control this by explicitly calling the constructor

Bar::Bar() : foo(42) {}

This is of course assuming you add a Foo::Foo(int) to the code :)

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1  
I see that most of you came up with "42" in your examples. Where does that come from? –  ichiban May 11 '09 at 20:13
7  
That is a reference to the H2G2 -- the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything. Read: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…. Even better read Douglas Adams. –  dirkgently May 11 '09 at 20:16
    
@ichiban, @dirkgently is correct. –  JaredPar May 11 '09 at 20:40
    
Incorrect: The default constructor of Foo will be called if it is user defined. If the user did not provide it, the compiler generated implicit default constructor will not be called. You can force the compiler to call it in the initialization list –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 12 '09 at 22:06

So Bar constains a full Foo object, not just a reference or pointer. Is this object initialized by its default constructor?

If Foo has a default ctor, an object of type Foo will be using the default ctor when you create an object of type Bar. Otherwise, you need to call the Foo ctor yourself or your Bar's ctor will make your compiler complain loduly.

E.g:

class Foo {
public:
 Foo(double x) {}
};

class Bar  {
 Foo x;
};

int main() {
 Bar b;
}

The above will have the compiler complain something like:

"In constructor 'Bar::Bar()': Line 5: error: no matching function for call to 'Foo::Foo()'

Do I need to explicitly call its constructor, and if so, how and where ?

Modify the above example as follows:

class Foo {
 public:
  Foo(double x) {} // non-trivial ctor
};

class Bar  {     
 Foo x;
public:
  Bar() : x(42.0) {} // non-default ctor, so public access specifier required
};

int main() {
 Bar b;
}
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If Foo does not have any constructor defined (besides possibly the copy constructor) then the compiler will not complain at all but will not call the implicitly defined Foo constructor either. The object will be uninitialized. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 12 '09 at 22:08
    
That is what I meant by default ctor. –  dirkgently May 12 '09 at 22:46

Full object. No, it's default constructed in Bar's default constructor.

Now, if Foo had a constructor that only took, say, an int. You'd need a constructor in Bar to call Foo's constructor, and say what that is:

class Foo {
public:
    Foo(int x) { .... }
};

class Bar {
public:
    Bar() : foo(42) {}

    Foo foo;
};

But if Foo had a default constructor Foo(), the compiler generates Bar's constructor automatically, and that would call Foo's default (i.e. Foo())

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I see that most of you came up with "42" in your examples. Where does that come from? –  ichiban May 11 '09 at 20:11
    
Wont work, all ctors are private by default. –  dirkgently May 11 '09 at 20:12
    
Oops. Fixed. I tend to leave that out when thinking/talking about other concepts. –  Macke May 11 '09 at 20:32
    
@ichiban: Read 'The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy' by Douglas Adams. It's a classic very funny novel that most techy types attach to. (The latter instances in the 5-book series aren't as good as the first ones though..) –  Macke May 11 '09 at 20:34
1  
@dirkgently: Compiler-generated ("implicity-declared") functions (default constructor, copy constructor, assignment operator, destructor) are "inline public" by default. Explicitly declared members of a class are private unless otherwise specified. –  David Thornley May 11 '09 at 20:53

Unless you specify otherwise, foo is initialized using its default constructor. If you want to use some other constructor, you need to do so in the initializer list for Bar:

Bar::Bar( int baz ) : foo( baz )
{
    // Rest of the code for Bar::Bar( int ) goes here...
}
share|improve this answer
    
If Foo has a user defined default constructor then it will be called. For a implicitly defined default constructor in Foo, no call will be made in the implicitly defined constructor of Bar. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 12 '09 at 22:13

You do not need to call the default contructor explicitly in C++, it will be called for you. If you wanted to call a different contructor, you could do this:

Foo foo(somearg)
share|improve this answer
    
If Foo has a user defined default constructor then it will be called. For a implicitly defined default constructor in Foo, no call will be made in the implicitly defined constructor of Bar –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 12 '09 at 22:13

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